Course details

Study options

Full-time: 3 years

UK/EU fee

£9,250 per year (2020/21)

International fee

£14,045 per year (2020/21)

UCAS points

120 (September 2021 entry)

UCAS code

M1M2

Course level

Undergraduate

Start date

September

Location

One Friar Gate Square, Derby Campus

Course description

100%overall student satisfaction - LLB with Criminology**National Student Survey 2020

By studying our LLB (Hons) with Criminology you’ll gain a comprehensive all-round undergraduate legal education, alongside a thorough grounding in criminology and the challenges facing criminal justice professionals today.

You'll cover every aspect of legal services and engage with all the core professional skills, bringing what you read in the textbooks to life through genuine practical experience. At the same time, you’ll debate major ideas about retribution, rehabilitation and punishment, exploring why people commit crime, why laws are created and broken, the effectiveness of sentencing and punishment, and the impact of crime on victims, communities and wider society. 

Flexibility and choice are a cornerstone of this course: our broad selection of optional modules means that you can specialise in areas as diverse as company law, commercial and consumer law, family law, international human rights, child protection, murder, psychopathy, cybercrime and miscarriages of justice.  

Professional Recognition 

The Derby LLB (Hons) with Criminology meets stringent criteria set by the Bar Standards Board and Solicitors Regulation Authority and covers all the foundations of legal knowledge. As a ‘qualifying law degree’, it offers exemptions from the academic stage of study if you want to progress to become a barrister or solicitor. 

Hands-on learning

Derby Law School has an ethos of ‘learning by doing’ to build your employability skills and ensure you’re work-ready on graduation. We offer different variations of real-world learning to take legal education out of the abstract and into reality – from mooting competitions and mock trials to drafting contracts and bail applications.

Work placements enable you to learn more about the legal sector. Through the Law School’s excellent relationship with the local legal profession, some of our students in previous years have had the opportunity to undertake work placements.  The Law School actively supports students in identifying work placements where possible. A vibrant programme of ‘paid for’ study visits will give you insights into the profession, including fieldtrips to local courts. Previous students on our LLB (Hons) with Criminology have toured London, including the Supreme Court and the Houses of Parliament and have also visited The Hague, the legal capital of the world, where you can see the international courts in action. There is also an opportunity to visit Dublin to explore a different legal system.

Links with the profession

Contributions from the wider legal community, including regular careers talks and workshops, are central to this course. Through our professional mentoring scheme, practitioners from the legal field will share their perspectives with you. All students on the course are eligible to apply for this scheme. Previous mentors have included serving judges, solicitors and barristers. In some cases this has led to placements, part-time paralegal work and even permanent jobs for our students.

A highlight of our academic calendar is a prestigious black-tie law dinner where you can network with members of the local judiciary and legal profession. In addition, the Derby Junior Lawyers group invites our students to networking events and social opportunities. You can also join our active student Law Society.

Student Legal Advice Centre and Pro Bono work

Our Student Legal Advice Centre enables you to build your skills in clinical legal practice by offering free advice and assistance to members of the public. It reaches out to individuals who might otherwise be unable to access such services due to financial constraints.

Through the Centre, you’ll undertake a high-quality programme of training, engage in simulated scenarios and then work under the close supervision of a qualified solicitor to help members of the community with issues including family law and criminal injuries compensation authority claims. You’ll meet with clients, take instructions, carry out research and advise accordingly. In some circumstances, you could even represent the client at a form of tribunal.

In addition, the Law Student Representation project – a joint initiative between Derby Law School and Derbyshire County Council – provides much-needed social security representation to people countywide. During six-month placements, our students work alongside experienced representatives supporting benefit appeals.

Expert teaching

Our teaching team includes barristers, solicitors, criminal psychologists, sociologists and experienced police officers. Several are still actively engaged with practice, which helps you keep up to date with contemporary issues in justice. Our teaching is also enriched by research covering some of the most pressing issues confronting society today, from slavery to digital privacy.

The LLB (Hons) with Criminology is supported by visiting professors and guest lecturers who are leading authorities in their fields, including a deputy district judge and a coroner. Our celebrated Public Lecture Series also brings influential figures to the University to shed new light on the legal system.

Extra qualifications

If you have a particular interest in youth justice, the LLB (Hons) with Criminology gives you the chance to achieve an additional professional qualification – the Youth Justice in Effective Practice Certificate (YJEPC) – alongside your degree studies.

The YJEPC is the most widely held qualification in youth justice: since it was launched in 2012, it has been adopted by over half of the Youth Offending Teams countrywide to improve the skills of their staff. Bringing together current theory, practice and evidence, it will not only boost your employability but also help you to make more effective judgements in your future career.

The opportunity to gain the YJEPC is available if you take two specific modules – Working with Young Offenders and Youth Justice.

Facilities

Law students are based on the Derby Campus at One Friar Gate Square. It includes a mock court room, replica custody suite and social learning hubs where you can develop your skills and familiarise yourself with the type of environments you’ll encounter in real-life legal situations.

You’ll also be provided with all the leading essential texts from top publishers and unique content from Oxford University Press and Pearson.

Study overseas

Along with our international fieldtrips, we offer you the opportunity to spend time studying abroad as part of the LLB (Hons) with Criminology. We have an extensive network of global associates, including strong partnerships with universities in Pisa, Naples, Paris, The Hague and Brno in the Czech Republic. These not only ensure our curriculum is truly international but also paves the way for exchange opportunities.

Time spent abroad is an excellent way to improve your academic experience and enhance your job prospects while enjoying a different culture.

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What you will study

Year 1Year 1Year 2Year 2Year 3Year 3

Code: 4LA507

An Introduction to the Tort of Negligence

This module explores the concept of obligations imposed by law. To that end, it introduces the student to notions of tortious liability and uses an in-depth examination of the tort of negligence. Where appropriate, it links with the notion of contractual obligations in order to demonstrate the interaction between certain contractual obligations and those of a tortious nature. It is assessed by a combination of coursework and performance in tutorials.
20 Credits
core
Coursework

Code: 4LA507

Tortious Liability and Negligence

This module explores the concept of obligations imposed by law. To that end, it introduces the student to notions of tortious liability and uses an in-depth examination of the tort of negligence. Where appropriate, it links with the notion of contractual obligations in order to demonstrate the interaction between certain contractual obligations and those of a tortious nature. It is assessed by a combination of coursework and performance in tutorials.
20 Credits
core
Coursework

Code: 4LA500

Administrative Law and Human Rights

Administrative Law and Human Rights focuses on the process and rationale for judicial review of bodies exercising public functions. It takes the students through each stage of the process, using practical examples and case law to illuminate the key methods and principles for the control of public power by the courts.

It is essentially a practice-focused module that will equip the students through teaching and assessed practice to undertake a time-constrained simulation of the first stage of judicial review as their summative assessment. In the teaching and learning students engage with as part of the module, particular emphasis is placed on the UK human rights framework and the ongoing dialogue between the executive and the courts in relation to rights in public law. Employability will be enhanced for students seeking to work in legal professional practice connected to administrative and human rights law, as well as for students seeking to work in the public sector more broadly.

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20 Credits
core
Practical

Code: 4LA501

Constitutional Law and Civil Liberties

This module explores the legal and constitutional foundations of public power in England. More than any other area of law it has to draw on the rich historical, political and social traditions that veil the distinct absence of full mechanisms of legal accountability of central government and law-making institutions.

The traditional underlying principles of the British constitution will be explored and examined in their historical context and their relevance in light of modern constitutional arrangements explored. The effect of external influences such as membership of the European Union, the European Convention on Human Rights and international law obligations will also be addressed. Finally, the efficiency of the constitution in protecting civil liberties will be explored. In addition, students, through regular assessed tutorial essays, will be taught the vital skill of academic legal writing.

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20 Credits
core
Exam

Code: 4LA502

Contract Law Theory and Practice

This module examines the formation of voluntary legal relationships. It considers how contracts are entered into, agreed, evidenced, vitiated (impaired) and discharged. It considers the theoretical and normative nature of contractual obligations in the context of the common law and statute. Terms, conditions and warranties are considered, as is their relationship with public policy, such as consumer protection legislation.

This module will be taught through a combination of media: lectures, tutorials, reflective questions and group work. Lectures will be used to introduce each subject and explore difficult topics in depth. 

Tutorials provide an opportunity for students to analyse practical questions related to the subject material, thus providing a real link between the academic subject material and legal practice. Reflective questions on Blackboard will reinforce the independent self-study that is undertaken. Students will be expected to work in groups for Contract Law in Practice, in the style of a law firm providing advice to a client.

An opportunity for all students to complete a formative mock-examination will be provided in the first semester of the module.

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20 Credits
core
Exam
Coursework

Code: 4LA504

Legal Skills and Practice

The study of Law at LLB Honours level needs to be placed into its theoretical, societal, historical and administrative context. The issues of professional practice – in particular those relating to professional ethics – require focused examination.

This module provides the opportunity for student to do this. An undergraduate student of Law also needs to acquire appropriate skills. As well as skills which relate to the study and method of Law, students require reinforcement and development of their communication, research, information technology and basic legal research skills together with development of general critical abilities. 

This module seeks to provide a structured route, allowing students to achieve these objectives and demonstrate their skills development in a tangible way and at a level that may not always be required through the skills development that takes places within substantive modules. It acts as a foundation for further study and assists employability by giving the student transferable skills to use while undertaking the award and also in further vocational stages and research stages of education.

An international context is delivered by consideration of comparative legal systems and the European influence on the UK jurisdiction. The study of ethics is introduced and a specific workshop is delivered in which key areas are highlighted.

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20 Credits
core
Practical
Coursework

Code: 4LA506

The Tort of Negligence in Context

This module explores further the concept of obligations imposed by Law. It builds upon the module Tortious Liability and Negligence (a prerequisite for this module) by extending students’ studies to encompass the major areas of tort other than negligence. It is assessed by way of a written examination.
20 Credits
core
Exam

Code: 5LA503

Land Law

Through lectures and tutorials, the student develops a concept of ownership/title and how these relate to both land and personality. The historical background of conveyancing, leading to the present system of unregistered/registered title to land and the concept of trusts of land, along with the roles of trustees and beneficiaries. Estates and land tenure is discussed, and what is included in the sale of land as fixtures and chattels. Interests, such as legal, equitable, third party and overriding are discussed, along with covenants and easements. The student will have a general understanding of co-ownership, licences, leases and mortgages by the end of the module.
20 Credits
core
Exam

Code: 5LA510

Criminal Law Principles and Application

Criminal law is a fascinating and ever-changing area of law. This module aims to provide students with an understanding of the essential elements of criminal liability which include the guilty act, the required mental state and the proof of causation, along with a consideration of any relevant defences, and the relationship between these.

The module aims to explore these concepts in relation to the application of these to a variety of both fatal offences and non-fatal offences. The module also considers mechanisms of liability which deal with discrete areas of criminal liability and the application of these concepts in practice.

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20 Credits
core
Exam
Coursework

Code: 5LA511

Criminal Practice and Property Offences

Criminal Practice and Property Offences enables students to gain an understanding of how criminal liability arises in relation to a range of specific offences relating to property and to understand how the criminal law operates to protect property rights and impose liability. The module will also consider the liability of parties for their actions prior to the completion of a criminal act in relation to a range of offences. It equips students for further study and gives an understanding of general procedural requirements.

The assessment strategy is in place in order to enable students to gain academic understanding of the substantive law and how such law ‘works in practice’. The module has links with professional accreditation bodies such as ILEX (Institute of Legal Executives). It provides a foundation to further vocational study with ILEX, LPC (Legal Practice Course) or BPTC (Bar Professional Training Course). Students will gain employability skills and benefit from knowledge of the general workings of the criminal litigation process, coupled with property offences, in contemporary legal society. There is an international dimension in that the module considers the possibility of foreign nationals absconding in the Bail process.

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20 Credits
core
Practical
Coursework

Code: 5LA530

European Union Law and its International Context

The nature of European Union law means that no study of the English legal system is complete without an understanding of the impact of this wide-ranging area of law. Its impact can be most clearly felt in public law and this module will build on the understanding of the structure and decision-making process of the European Union gained in that module.

However, European Union law cannot be seen as a stand-alone set of rules. Students will analyse the extent to which the law of the European Union creates rules to further the aims of the key treaties and the impact that this has had on the legal systems of the member states in diverse areas of law such as commercial law and employment law.

The module considers the impact in more depth, using principles of trade law to enable students to examine the effect and applicability of European law in a variety of real-World contexts. This will inevitably involve an understanding of the political and social context in which European Union law sits. Students will be required to both analyse, compare and apply principles of European Union law to ensure an understanding of the broad impact of this area of law. This holistic approach reflects the pervasive nature of European Union law in real-World settings.

Students will be taught through a mix of lectures and workshops which will guide and give context to the independent reading, research and preparation.

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20 Credits
core
Coursework

Code: 5LA531

Legal and Business Competence

The purpose of this modules is to develop skills which are required to resolve complex issues and problems that materialise during the course of legal practice and representation.

The modules address the broader aspects of legal practice and places the student in the role not only of a legal advisor but also as the person who will have to structure transactions, resolve issues, and overcome blockers. Students will also have to engage in collaborative team working as the process of engaging with these skills. Throughout the module reflective practice is consistently used as a process for learning and development.

Students will work holistically with their substantive modules and the module will facilitate the intersection between the application of substantive law and skills.

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20 Credits
core
Coursework

Code: 5LA533

Equity and Succession

Ensuring that property is distributed according to the wishes of its owner is of fundamental importance within the English legal system and beyond. It is vital that society recognises and respects an individual’s right to property and thus an individual’s right to dispose of property as they see fit.

This module aims to provide you with the knowledge necessary to understand not only what the different methods of property transfer are, but which is the best, most effective method of property transfer to meet your client’s needs. You will study the legal requirements and ramifications of each method of transfer, before assessing which method should be adopted in a given set of circumstances.

If a trust is selected, what obligations is the trustee under? If the desire is to transfer property through a Will, how does one ensure that the will in question is legally binding

This module takes substantive legal knowledge and places it in a real world context of will drafting and estate distribution. Building on both the skill and knowledge gained in contract law at level 4, and developing alongside that gained in Land law, this module will require you to consider how the law does, and crucially should, apply to real world scenarios.

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20 Credits
core
Practical

Code: 6LA552

Commercial Awareness and Business Acumen

Students will engage with all the required skills to create and deliver a successful business, as well engage in skills that ensure a business remains productive and profitable despite changes in the market, and in the case of law firms, to changes to the provision of legal services.
20 Credits
core
Coursework

Code: 6CJ501

Cybercrime

This module examines cybercrime as one of the fastest-growing criminal activities and explores the transformation of criminal activity in the information age. The module will examine issues such as: the automation of offender victim engagement; policing online deviance; practical, ethical and legal issues for the detection, investigation and prosecution of cybercrime; the global nature of many cybercrimes; the relevance and applicability of existing criminological theory to a range of cybercrimes; predicting future challenges of cybercrimes for individuals, the criminal justice system and society as a whole.
20 Credits
optional
Coursework

Code: 6CJ510

Youth Justice

This module brings together the current state of theory, practice and evidence to give you the knowledge, confidence and knowledge base and transferable skills around working with young people at risk of offending. It will also give you the framework to assess new ideas and evidence arising in the future. The module is taught in three blocks; block one introduces you to the youth justice system operating in England and Wales providing you with a historical perspective on how the system has evolved over time and how it compares with systems in other countries. You are encouraged to reflect on political and social attitudes to young people and their impact on responses to youth crime. The second element focuses on theories of youth offending and provides you with an opportunity to consider the question, ‘why do young people commit crimes?’.

You will develop your understanding of the theoretical perspectives introduced at Level 4 that have emerged in an attempt to explain youth crime and will have the opportunity to apply these theories to the case studies of five young people that will be introduced to you during this module. The final block looks at current practice in youth justice and how the ‘what works’ movement has developed, you will also consider some of the frameworks that have been developed for judging the quality and reliability of research and the challenges this raises.

You can undertake this module alongside the sister module - Working with Young Offenders in the Spring Semester - to build towards the Youth Justice in Effective Practice Certificate, an industry recognised practitioner-based certificate, awarded by UNITAS and endorsed by Skills for Justice. Since it was introduced in 2012 the YJEPC has been used by over half of Youth Offending Teams to enhance their members’ skills and knowledge. It is also used by the secure estate, individuals seeking to advance a career in youth justice and volunteers looking to widen their knowledge.

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20 Credits
optional
Coursework

Code: 6CJ539

Sexual Violence, Exploitation and Abuse

This module explores the sexual violence, exploitation and abuse of women, children and men. In particular, it focuses upon the impact on victims and the responses of voluntary and state services. It starts by unpacking what is meant by ‘sexual violence’, analysing social attitudes, myths, moral panics and the impact on contemporary society. Here, the focus is on sexual politics, the control of sexual behaviours and philosophical approaches to sex and sexuality. Secondly, the module considers violence against women, men and children with an emphasis on policy and practice, considering the role of practitioners in supporting victims of sexual crimes. There will be an exploration of the responses of the criminal justice system, including changing policy and practice and competing theories on supporting victims of sexual violence. As a result, this module provides both a broad theoretical framework and applied knowledge for those students seeking to work with victims of sexual violence.
20 Credits
optional
Coursework

Code: 6CJ542

Working with Young Offenders

This module provides you with the practical skills as well as the theoretical underpinning to work with young people at risk of offending. It will give you the knowledge that you need to make informed decisions about the interventions which offer the best prospect of success in a particular case. It will also guide you to ways of implementing interventions that will engage and involve young people and hence has an applied element. The module is taught in two blocks, with an optional third if you wish to undertake the Certificate. In the first block you will consider the structural cycle of interventions and the key components of assessment, planning and review. You are encouraged to explore different approaches to assessment and consider the importance of linking assessments to intervention planning.

You will also evaluate safeguarding issues and the diversity of young people in determining the most appropriate interventions. Having looked at the cycle of intervention, block two explores the significance of building and sustaining relationships with young people at all stages of the cycle in order to promote positive outcomes. You will have the opportunity to develop your understanding of communication strategies by young offenders as well as enhance your own applied skills with a practical focus.

You can undertake this module alongside the sister module - Youth Justice - in the Autumn Semester to build towards the Youth Justice in Effective Practice Certificate, an industry recognised practitioner based certificate, awarded by UNITAS and endorsed by Skills for Justice. Since it was introduced in 2012 the YJEPC has been used by over half of the Youth Offending Teams to enhance their members’ skills and knowledge. It is also used by the secure estate, individuals seeking to advance a career in youth justice and volunteers looking to widen their knowledge.

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20 Credits
optional
Coursework

Code: 6CJ542

Working with Young Offenders

This module provides you with the practical skills as well as the theoretical underpinning, to work with young people at risk of offending. It will give you the knowledge that you need to make informed decisions about the interventions which offer the best prospect of success in a particular case. It will also guide ways of implementing interventions that will engage and involve young people. You will consider the structural cycle of interventions and the key components of assessment, planning and review.

You will also evaluate safeguarding issues and the diversity of young people in determining the most appropriate interventions. The significance of building and sustaining relationships with young people at all stages of the cycle in order to promote positive outcomes will be explored and you will have the opportunity to develop your understanding of communication strategies by young offenders. Finally, the role that desistance can play in ensuring continued change will be considered through transition planning. This module can be taken alongside the sister module – Youth Justice in the Autumn Semester to build towards the Youth Justice in Effective Practice Certificate, an industry recognised practitioner based certificate, awarded by UNITAS and endorsed by Skills for Justice.

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20 Credits
optional
Coursework

Code: 6CJ546

Murder: Dynamics, Pathologies and Investigation

Accounts of murder are commonplace in today’s world. Whilst they fixate both public and media attention, beyond the simplicity of newspaper headlines the offence of murder often involves complex underlying dynamics, psychological pathologies, detailed investigative procedures, and a legal framework for sentencing and punishment. In this module, students travel the chronology of murder, from the development of a killer’s psychology through to the commission of the offence(s), their investigation, and then sentencing. Students will see, from crime scene to trial, the complex tasks of both understanding, and investigating, murderers and their crimes.
20 Credits
optional
Coursework

Code: 6LA505

Commercial and Consumer Law

The module examines the law relating to the sale and supply of goods and services, agency, product safety, insurance and consumer credit. In this capacity it builds on general principles of contract law by focusing specifically on contracts of sale and supply of goods and services as well as addressing the rights and protection afforded to consumers.

It equips students for further study and gives a broad understanding of both substantive and procedural requirements. The assessment strategy is in place in order to enable students to gain academic understanding and how such law works in practice in the commercial sectors. It provides a foundation to further vocational study with ILEX (Institute of Legal Executives), LPC (Legal Practice Course) or BPTC (Bar Professional Training Course) or postgraduate courses. 

Students will gain employability skills and benefit from knowledge of the workings of the commercial and consumer processes in contemporary legal society. There is an international dimension in that the module considers international consumer protection issues and their applicability in the UK jurisdiction.

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20 Credits
optional
Exam
Practical
Coursework

Code: 6LA508

Company Law

This module explores the nature of the company as a business medium. Students will examine how the law regulates the company, evaluating the significance of internal procedures, documentary records and financial aspects.

Further, the roles of directors, shareholders, the company secretary and auditors are explored. Analysis of reconstructions, mergers and acquisitions is undertaken as well as the implications and options available on insolvency. Module content includes topics applicable for the relevant ILEX (Institute of Legal Executives) module and serves to prepare students wishing to undertake the ILEX assessments for this area of study. Students are assessed by coursework and written examination.

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20 Credits
optional
Exam
Coursework

Code: 6LA512

Employment Law

This module explores the key principles and policies which underpin employment law with a particular emphasis on the regulation of the employment relationship in the workplace. Assessment is by way of an essay and an individual written assignment based around a role-play workshop.
20 Credits
optional
Coursework

Code: 6LA516

Family Law and Practice

This module will enable students to appreciate the main areas of law and practice which need to be addressed on the breakdown of relationships. Students will examine the divorce process with particular reference to ancillary relief and children issues. They will also consider the impact of law on unmarried couples and same-sex partners. The module will give students a practical grounding in the practice and procedure of the divorce process, including drafting a petition, the strategic considerations involved in advising and decision making, and advocacy.
20 Credits
optional
Exam
Practical

Code: 6LA521

Evidence

Evidence is a significant area of law which is directly relevant to all court actions and the information introduced during such proceedings. Emphasis is placed on evidence in criminal court proceedings with some comparative consideration of the civil court process and rules of evidence.

The module explores the body of legal rules regulating the roles and input of the judge, jury and witnesses, and the court process. Rules relating to the level of proof and burden of proof required in court actions and the role and rights of the police in obtaining evidence are studied. Specific types of evidence are studied along with issues of their admissibility and their value and weight. It is assessed by coursework and by written examination.

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20 Credits
optional
Exam
Coursework

Code: 6LA522

Intellectual Property Law

This module explores the law and procedure relating to the protection of intellectual property and the exploitation of the results of intellectual, scientific, technical, artistic, literary, musical and entrepreneurial endeavour. Its main focus is the law of the UK in its European setting, but appropriate reference is made to the international perspective. The module is assessed by a portfolio of work.
20 Credits
optional
Coursework

Code: 6LA523

Sustainable Development and International Business Law

This module draws together two pertinent strands operative in international relations between states. These are the process of sustainable development and the regulation of international business transactions.

The module will explore and analyse the theory and practice of sustainable development as well as analyse international business transaction as it relates to the sale of goods and the provision of services. In this capacity, the module will link these two strands and will engage students with live and contemporary development problems facing governments and then allow the students to implement functional and realistic business solutions to these problems.

The module places the student at the heart of sustainable international business and fosters problem-solving, creativity, enterprise, critical analysis and innovation for the purpose of direct impact. To bolster this, the module will engage and interact with the Government Department for International Development and, the British Council through guest speakers and projects offered by these institutions. The assessment is by coursework and will require students to analyse a series of case studies and implement a sustainable business transaction.

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20 Credits
optional
Practical
Coursework

Code: 6LA525

Medical Law and Ethics

Medical Law and Ethics is a fascinating and rapidly developing field of study and application. It is required to address patients’ rights to appropriately decisive involvement in their healthcare provision and clinical management.

It also raises increasingly challenging issues in relation to the regulation of rapidly emerging potentials in the field of assisted reproduction technologies, organ transplantation and in the light of changing societal attitudes to the care of the terminally ill. Quite literally, it concerns life and death matters and consequently interfaces significantly with ethical and philosophical perspectives which will form an integral part of this course.

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20 Credits
optional
Practical
Coursework

Code: 6LA526

Child Protection

This module will enable students to appreciate the law’s role in caring for and protecting children in need and the role of the various agencies involved in carrying out their legislative obligations.
20 Credits
optional
Exam
Coursework

Code: 6LA527

Coroners Court

This module gives students the opportunity to explore the role of the Coroners Court in identifying the medical cause of death: where this is not immediately known; when a person has died suddenly; or where the cause of death was not natural and may have occurred in circumstances where medical treatment was inadequate and/or negligent.

The role of the coroner in ascertaining the cause of death is considered as well as the role of the expert medical witness. The module explores the process and requirement for reporting a death to the coroner, as well the conduct of the inquest with consideration as to when a jury will be involved in this process. The module also considers the power of the coroner to report findings where the death was preventable. Additionally access to legal aid to assist at coroners court is considered along a consideration of possible action following the inquest.

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20 Credits
optional
Coursework

Code: 6LA530

Mental Health Law

This module will explore the statutory and common law provisions of mental health law. The definition of a “mental disorder” will be examined in detail. The idea of competence in medicine and where the line should fall between capacity and incapacity will also be discussed. It will be questioned whether certain patients can make medical decisions for themselves.

A patient can be sectioned under the Mental Health Act 1983 if they are suspected to be suffering from a mental disorder. These provisions will be explored and their fairness will be called into question. The definition of treatment is also rather controversial, and students will get an opportunity to learn how medical treatment has developed over the generations. 

Anorexic patients are deemed to have a mental disorder under the Mental Health Act 1983, and many human rights complaints have arisen as a result of force-feeding these vulnerable patients. The notion of “food” being a “treatment” for a mental disorder will be examined in this module.

The role of the Mental Health Review Tribunal will be outlined, and their role in community care will be researched. Patients can, of course, admit themselves to hospital and care for themselves. The provisions to allow this will be highlighted towards the end of the module.

Finally, the healthcare of prisoners will be explored in this module. It is thought by some commentators that prisoners are suffering from significant mental health disorders and are not being treated appropriately in their prison environment.

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20 Credits
optional
Coursework

Code: 6LA534

The Older Client

With an increasingly ageing population, lawyers need to be aware of the range of demands from the older client. The range of issues allow students to specialise in this area and increase their employability.
20 Credits
optional
Exam
Coursework

Code: 6LA546

Licensing Law

Licensing Law is a niche area of law and is an example of an administrative legal process. As well as administrative law, the module will cover related elements of criminal law and human rights law. Study of licensing law will provide students with a practical understanding of a legal process from start to finish, from application to determination, covering the relevant law, procedure, evidence, guidance, policy, case law and human rights.

The module will include the licensing of alcohol and entertainment, sexual entertainment venues and gambling.

Assessment will primarily be by way of examination to test knowledge and understanding but there will also be a practical element of coursework aimed at testing knowledge and application of the subject material. An administrative licensing process inevitably warrants applications to be made to licensing authorities and to the court and students will gain an understanding of Licensing Law in part through completing the necessary applications.

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20 Credits
optional
Exam
Practical

Code: 6LA548

Domestic Abuse

Students will explore the definitions of domestic violence (DV) used by the various agencies involved in this area before analysing the nature and prevalence of DV and identifying the victims and perpetrators. The legal and medical responses to victims and perpetrators will also be examined and will be further evaluated by taking a psychological approach to the dynamics of abuse.
20 Credits
optional
Coursework

Code: 6LA549

Miscarriages of Justice

This module enables you to work in an applied manner with reference to cases of miscarriages of justice (MOJ). You will be working in groups throughout your final year on past and present cases with a view to identifying the causes of MOJ.

The first part of the module takes a more traditional and theoretical approach to the subject area which is, subsequently applied during the second half of the year using live cases. The rationale for this module is to identify common themes and causes of MOJ and to make recommendations for best practice and thus prevent and minimise the number of cases going to appeal.

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40 Credits
optional
Coursework

Code: 6LA551

Clinical Legal Skills

The emphasis of this module is on providing students with clinical legal education, which aligns with the applied and skills orientated approach of the programme. Students are provided with the opportunity to gain experience of legal practice in a live client setting, with the students applying and developing further the knowledge and skills learned throughout their journey on the programme, giving holistic value to the module as part of the programme. Through the link to other modules students will gain a more functional and meaningful understanding of the application of the law through the legal system.

Engagement with this module will develop both professional legal skills and transferrable skills. Furthermore, it will assist with employability.

This module provides the students with the opportunity to participate in the Centre’s provision of free legal and advice assistance to the community of Derby on a range of areas of law, which in itself will expose the students to social justice.

More information
40 Credits
optional
Coursework

Code: 6LA554

Human Rights in a Global World

In our globalised world, concern about the protection of human rights has continued to receive increasing attention. This module addresses the development of human rights protection through the consideration of a variety of international instruments and assessing their impact and efficacy in eradicating abuses. It examines the role of culturally entrenched practices in shaping the conversation on human rights protection and the challenges that result from this.

Specific areas of human rights concern such as the right to life, freedom of speech and other concerns such as transnational corporations and accountability for human rights violations would be considered. Through a series of case studies and role-play on hypothetical fact situations, this module will bring to light the current debates that surround the core principles of human rights and provide an opportunity for students to evaluate the efficacy of the current regime for the protection of human rights in the context of a global world.

More information
20 Credits
optional
Practical
Coursework

Code: 6LA555

International Law and World Affairs

This module provides an introduction to international law and its application to world affairs. The first aspect of this module explores the nature of international law and the attributes that make it distinct from national law. It also explores and challenges foundational issues such as the role of custom as a source of international law, the nature of international legal personality and the role of non-state actors in international law.

The second part of the module is a more applied aspect which looks at the role of international law and the limitations it faces in dealing with specific issues that arise in world affairs. Contemporary issues considered are likely to include terrorism, the use of force, protection of refugees, global poverty and environmental concerns. The limitations of international law in dealing with these issue will be critically analysed. Overall, this module provides a basis for students to carry out an informed assessment of the contribution and limits of international law as a force in world affairs.

More information
20 Credits
optional
Practical
Coursework

Code: 6LA998

Independent Study

This module seeks to provide students with a structured route to develop appropriate legal-specific research skills. It aims to equip students with both the practical and analytical abilities to complete a research project and also the skills to present an academic paper. Students are given the freedom to identify their preferred research topic areas.

The module equips students, where necessary, to address ethical and professional research issues, but also scaffolds the development of pure normative research approaches. Students will develop advanced research skills through independent learning, online and collaborative sessions with limited guidance from academic staff.

More information
20 Credits
optional
Coursework

Please note that our modules are subject to change - we review the content of our courses regularly, making changes where necessary to improve your experience and graduate prospects.

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Live Subject Chats

Join us on Saturday 28 November for a day of Live Subject Chats. You’ll be able to ask our teaching team questions about the courses we offer, speak to Admissions advisors about applying and chat to current students about their experience.

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How you will learn

The LLB with Criminology offers a variety of methods of learning and teaching. Engaging in real or simulated legal practice, you will practise a range of key skills at every stage of the course, including:

Our focus on problem-based learning will also ensure you achieve a wide-ranging understanding of criminal and community justice systems.  In addition, there is the chance to undertake problem-based research or to specialise through original academic enquiry. We have a Student Research Forum and there are opportunities for you to submit articles to the Derby Law School Journal and student blog.

Through our peer assisted mentoring scheme, students from later years of the course also give helpful guidance and support to first year students.

Showcasing your skills

We give you ample scope to take part in internal and external skills competitions which will raise your profile within the legal profession. ‘Mooting’ – where you present a legal issue against an opposing counsel in a mock court case – forms part of certain LLB modules and you can develop your expertise further through regional and national competitions representing Derby Law School. We have an excellent record of success in these challenges.

In your third year, our annual Legal Skills Triathlon, run in partnership with Derby & District Law Society, will test your advocacy, interview and negotiation skills. You will compete in teams with newly qualified lawyers and will be judged by a professional panel. Some of our students have secured jobs as a direct result of this experience.  

In a new venture, we help run a schools’ debating competition in partnership with Derby & District Law Society and Enterprise for Education where you can mentor local secondary school pupils providing them with key debating skills.

How you are assessed

Assessments enable you to develop and demonstrate your legal knowledge and skills effectively. They may include:

Who you’ll meet

Our teaching team is made up of experts with broad-ranging experience and diverse research interests. It includes:

Joel Klaff 

Lisa Cherkassky

Christie Eaton 

George Ellison 

Rachael Ita 

Sue Jennings 

Tim Marangon 

Larry Mead 

Michala Meiselles

Kaye Howells

Liz Doherty

Rebekah Marangon

Jo Drummond-Child

Personal academic tutoring

Your personal academic tutor will work with you to help you get the most out of your time at university. Having someone to talk to about your academic progress, your university experience and your professional aspirations is hugely valuable. We want you to feel challenged in your studies, stretched but confident to achieve your academic and professional goals.

Find out more about personal academic tutoring

Who will teach you

Joel in a classroom.

Joel Klaff
Programme leader

Joel is currently the Programme Leader for the Undergraduate LL.B Law Programmes. His areas of interest include Commercial Law, International Trade and International Economic Law. He has a further interest in ensuring that the Law School engages with the local community and thereby contributes and subscribes to values of Social Justice for the benefit of the local community.

View full staff profileView full staff profile

Entry requirements

September 2021 typical entry requirements

RequirementWhat we're looking for
UCAS points120
Specific requirements at A-level

No specific subject requirements

Specific requirements at GCSEGCSE Maths and English Grade 4/Grade C (or above) or equivalent qualification
IELTS6.0 (with 5.5 in each skills area)
Interview / AuditionN/A
PortfolioN/A

 Alternative entry qualifications:

We usually consider an A-level in General Studies as a supplementary qualification. A good application/performance will be taken into account if you do not meet the criteria/offer conditions.

Our entry requirements for this course should be read together with the University's general entry requirements, which details subjects we accept, alternative qualifications and what we're looking for at Derby.

Fees and funding

2020/21 Fees

 Full-timePart-time
UK/EU

£9,250 per year

N/A

International

£14,045 per year

N/A

Further information about our fees and support you may be entitled to.

Additional costs and optional extras

How to apply

UK/EU students

Full-time students applying to start in September should apply for this course through UCAS.

Apply through UCASApply directly to the University

Guidance for EU students post-Brexit

Careers

By the time you graduate, you will have a clear idea of the value of your LLB (Hons) with Criminology degree and the many different career directions it opens up – and you will be equipped to excel in whatever path you choose. Our graduates could go on to take up roles in private practice, the Crown Prosecution Service, the courts, law centres, the police, probation and prison services, local and national government, and youth offending teams.

Completion of the LLB represents the end of the academic stage of your training. To become a solicitor or barrister, you must then continue to complete the vocational stage of your training.

If you wish to become a solicitor, you will need to complete our LLM Legal Practice Course (LPC). Our graduates are highly sought after by solicitors’ firms because of their practical skills underpinned by academic rigour.

If you wish to become a barrister, you must take a one-year full-time or two-year part-time Bar Professional Training Course (BPTC). Our students are particularly successful at winning substantial scholarships for the BPTC, which is testimony to the calibre of teaching we offer.

Even if you do not want to become a legal practitioner, you will find that the LLB with Criminology is a valuable qualification and will act as a stepping stone to careers in broader areas. Legal skills will ensure you can make a strategic contribution in many professions including banking, commerce, industry, HR, politics, government, publishing and education. They will also prove helpful if you want to launch your own business.

Our Careers and Employment Service will provide you with support from day one of your course to ensure you leave Derby as a ‘work-ready’ graduate – industry aware, motivated and enterprising. Throughout your studies, you’ll also benefit from our Personal Development Planning (PDP) scheme which enables you to reflect on your learning and develop your career ambitions. 

The support continues once you’ve completed your course too: you are entitled to further help and guidance from the Careers and Employment Service for up to three years after leaving the University.

Further study

If you would like to take your studies to postgraduate level, the Derby LLM is a masters degree offering maximum flexibility, choice and opportunity. If you wish to become to a solicitor, you will need to complete our LLM LPC.

If you would prefer to pursue your Criminology studies at masters level, we also run acclaimed MSc qualifications in subjects such as Criminal Justice and Criminology,  Forensic and Criminal Psychology, and Criminal Investigation. These will expand your knowledge into more specialist areas and help accelerate your progress to senior and leadership roles.

As a graduate of the University of Derby, you may benefit from an alumni discount on your postgraduate course fees if you continue to study with us. Further information can be found here

 

Contact us

If you need any more information from us, eg on courses, accommodation, applying, car parking, fees or funding, please contact us and we will do everything we can to help you.

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Additional information about your studies

Teaching hours

Like most universities, we operate extended teaching hours at the University of Derby, so contact time with your lecturers and tutors could be anytime between 9am and 9pm. Your timetable will usually be available on the website 24 hours after enrolment on to your course.

Additional costs and optional extras

We’re committed to providing you with an outstanding learning experience. Our expert teaching, excellent facilities and great employability prepare you for your future career. As part of our commitment to you we aim to keep any additional study costs to a minimum. However, there are occasions where students may incur some additional costs.

The information below is correct for entry in the academic year September 2020 - August 2021 only. Entry for future academic years may be subject to change.

Included in your fees

Mandatory costs not included in your fees

Optional costs not included in your fees

Please note: Our courses are refreshed and updated on a regular basis. If you are thinking about transferring onto this course (into the second year for example), you should contact the programme leader for the relevant course information as modules may vary from those shown on this page.

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