Derby Civic University Agreement

The University of Derby has pledged to develop a Civic University Agreement that will reaffirm the University’s ongoing commitment to playing its part in the city and county’s prosperity and wellbeing.

Civic University Agreement

“Our view is that a university can only be regarded as a civic university if purpose – and strategy to support that purpose – includes making a positive civic impact. Universities which do not do this, but which do undertake valuable civic activity, can only be regarded as a civically engaged university. All universities can make more of a civic impact. But in our view being a civic university involves a level of effort and direction that has profound implications for how an institution operates,” Civic University Commission.

Derby’s Civic Ambition

The University of Derby has pledged to develop a Civic University Agreement, a document that will be co-created with local partners, and will reaffirm the University’s ongoing commitment to playing its part in the city and county’s prosperity and wellbeing.

The first phase of the University of Derby becoming a ‘Civic University’ is understanding and establishing the needs and priorities of communities, businesses and organisations across Derby and Derbyshire.

To do this we are undertaking a broad consultation exercise, aimed at engaging with as many people as possible from across the city and county, which we will then use to help shape our approach going forward.

We would welcome your input, thoughts and ideas on this, and how we may be able to deliver long-term positive impact for Derby and Derbyshire.

Have your say

To have your say please complete the University of Derby Civic Survey or sign up to the Derby Civic Forum taking place on Thursday 27 June (9am-12.30pm)

Staff members for the Community Day greeting visitors at the University of Derby at Kedleston Road
Two young men having a maths exercise explained to them by a teacher in a classroom

The Civic University Commission

Universities are facing a host of challenges. Politicians and commentators from all sides are asking fundamental questions about their purpose, whether they provide ‘value for money’, and whether they serve students and taxpayers. The Commission is an attempt to shift the debate on higher education, but it has a more fundamental and practical purpose. Universities will exist for centuries (indeed many already have) – far beyond any piece of government legislation or headline in the papers.

The Commission wanted to look at how, concretely, universities can serve their place as well as play a global role, and to understand how civic universities operate today, how they operated in the past, and how they should operate in the future.

Following a thorough 12-month consultation, where the commission looked at evidence from a wide range of sources including public opinion; expert witnesses and written evidence, a report was published.

Key headlines of its findings include:

Read the Civic University Commission Final Report.