Course details

Study options

Full-time: 3 years, Part-time: Up to 6 years

UK/EU fee

£9,250 per year (2020/21)

International fee

£14,045 per year (2020/21)

UCAS points

128 (September 2021 entry)

UCAS code

C800

Course level

Undergraduate

Qualification

BSc (Hons)

Start date

September

Location

Kedleston Road, Derby Campus

If you do not achieve the typical entry points required, you may want to consider studying this course with foundation year.

View with foundation year optionView with foundation year option

Course description

Our Psychology courses are designed to meet the growing need for effective, skilled and forward-thinking psychologists. This course has research at its heart, empowering you to create new knowledge in the field of Psychology.

The British Psychological Society logo.

1stin the UK for student satisfaction**Guardian University Guide 2021
1stin the UK for satisfaction with teaching**Guardian University Guide 2021
97%overall student satisfaction - BSc (Hons) Psychology**National Student Survey 2020

Psychology at Derby

As the scientific study of human thought and behaviour, psychology is a fascinating subject and opens up diverse career avenues. With professional recognition from the British Psychological Society, our course is intellectually challenging, giving you a platform to explore the latest debates about the social, developmental, cognitive and biological dimensions of behaviour.

You’ll join a strong community of staff and students who are passionate about psychology, gaining the theoretical knowledge and applied research skills that employers across many different sectors are seeking.

This is a research-led degree, which means you'll be taught by expert staff who are conducting influential studies into the specific areas of psychology you study - examples of their current research topics include mental health and wellbeing, compassion and mindfulness, autism, maths anxiety, nature connectedness, paranormal beliefs, and the psychological aspects of pain, anxiety and addiction. You'll also benefit from guest lectures by world-class researchers. As part of the course, you’ll conduct your own research and have the opportunity to contribute to the cutting-edge psychological research projects underway at the University. You'll also have access to specialist software to learn how to design, conduct, analyse and report both qualitative and quantitative research in psychology.

As part of your studies, you’ll look at the applications of psychology in a wide range of areas – from understanding the nature and causes of mental illness to investigating decision making in real life situations. The course offers optional modules, allowing you to tailor your degree to a career path or area of interest, such as:

Our courses provide the opportunity to study with a placement year to help you translate theory into practice, and enhance your employability. BSc (Hons) Psychology student, Sara Slamkova talks about her experience on the course below.

Sara Slamkova – Psychology student vlog

View Sara Slamkova's video transcript

Expert teaching

As a student at the University of Derby you'll be working with lecturers and tutors who have a wealth of knowledge and experience, and are carrying out research designed to offer fresh perspectives on issues that are significant at every stage of life, from birth to old age. Their wide-ranging work includes research into:

You’ll benefit from this research as your lecturers bring the latest thinking to your studies, and in some cases you will have opportunities to get involved in research projects yourself. 

Romaana Kapadi at Derby

Romaana's rare research feat

Our undergraduate Psychology student Romaana Kapadi used her passion for her subject and her research skills to achieve the rare feat of seeing her work published in an academic journal.

Read about Romaana's successRead about Romaana's success

Accredited course

The British Psychological Society have eight overarching standards which we have met and achieved, so you can be sure that the quality of our teaching, and the content of our course is of the highest standard. The BPS commended our psychology team for their strong commitment to student development, support and inclusion. 

As our degree is accredited by the BPS, if you achieve at least a second class honours qualification and obtain at least 40% in your Independent Study in Psychology, you will be eligible for the Graduate Basis for Chartered Membership (GBC) of the Society. You can then progress to accredited postgraduate qualifications and training to gain chartered membership.

The accreditation offers additional benefits to you as a student - student membership is open to everyone studying on a BPS accredited course. Membership includes access to networking opportunities, the BPS student online community, discounts on books, events and e-learning, academic journals, and the chance to transfer to graduate membership free of charge after completing your degree. 

Specialist facilities

You’ll benefit from our excellent facilities, which are used for both teaching and research. 

They include high specification computing labs with specialist software for experimental design. You'll be introduced to this software right from the start of your degree and will also receive training in qualitative research design. This will help you to develop your skills in interviewing and running focus groups, which are crucial for carrying out qualitative research effectively.

To undertake your investigations, you'll also have access to dedicated project rooms and a range of psychological recording equipment such as the latest eye tracker equipment for analysing eye movement. 

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What you will study

Year 1Year 1Year 2Year 2Optional Placement YearOptional Placement YearYear 3Year 3

Code: 4PS501

Does Psychology Matter?

This module will introduce students to Psychology as a critical discipline. As such, the module aims to use a number of key topic areas through which to explore how psychologists discuss and debate such issues.

The module will impress upon students the need to use evidence to support arguments, to recognise and consider alternative viewpoints and to construct their arguments with care and precision. Furthermore it will help to promote such key transferable skills as critical thinking, argument construction, and communication which will be of benefit to the student in both their academic studies and future employment. Teaching on the module will be by a mixture of interactive lectures and informal, small group debate and discussion.

More information
20 Credits
core
Coursework

Code: 4PS502

Psychology in the Modern World

The module will examine how psychology can explain our experience of and engagement with the modern world. The breadth of psychology as a discipline and its potential for explaining human experience will be illustrated by using a number of contemporary issues to highlight the contribution of psychological theory and knowledge.

The module will promote a range of key transferable skills such as observation and analysis, independent investigation and appreciation of different perspectives which will be of benefit to the student in both their academic studies and future employment. Delivery will be by a mixture of interactive lectures and informal, small group debate and discussion.

More information
20 Credits
core
Practical
Coursework

Code: 4PS503

Psychological Research in Practice

This module aims to familiarise students with a range of practical techniques and methodological approaches in psychology. Students will engage with a series of lectures, seminars and practical workshops based on research that has been undertaken within a variety of areas within psychology. Through these sessions students will develop an appreciation of the varied approaches to psychological research psychologists have used and the methodological challenges individual approaches pose. Students will also develop their report writing skills.
20 Credits
core
Coursework

Code: 4PS519

Skills and Careers in Psychology I

This free standing module is a zero-credit module that is core for all single honours psychology students and prescribed for major and joint pathway joint honours psychology students (optional for minor pathway JHS psychology students) and will be assessed using a pass/fail element.

The module and assessment fulfils the Personal Development Planning (PDP) requirements of the programme for Level 4. It will provide students with academic, careers and employability support throughout the first year of their degree. The learning materials will cover skills within the graduate framework (e.g. Higher Education Academy; Graduate Employment 2010 and Future Fit, CBI 2009).

A number of workshops will be offered to address fundamental skills required within the degree, such as basic essay writing techniques and assessment skills. Careers workshops will showcase the support services available, and encourage students to think about improving their employability. Not only will these enhance students’ academic development but they will also present skills that are transferable to a number of different contexts. Alongside the expertise of the psychology team, the university’s Careers and Employability Service will also be an important resource for key information and highlighting relevant opportunities.

More information
0 Credits
core
Coursework

Code: 4PS520

Introduction to Research Methods in Psychology

The purpose of this module is to provide students with an introduction to the key principles underlying research methods in psychology. Students will be taught the need for systematic research methods and will explore the relationship between theory and data in both quantitative and qualitative research.

Students will learn key principles in research design and will engage in the practical aspects of generating quantitative and qualitative research data. Students will learn how to analyse quantitative and qualitative data and how to report the findings of simple psychological studies in a standardised format.

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20 Credits
core
Coursework

Code: 4PS521

Introduction to Biological and Developmental Psychology

This module has two components, Developmental Psychology and Biological Psychology. The Developmental Psychology component introduces students to concepts, theories and methods relevant to the study of child development. Students will first be introduced to the area of developmental psychology, its historical development, the methods used by researchers working in this field and key debates such as what drives development? The research and theories proposed by key figures working in the areas of social and cognitive development will then be discussed.

Within the Biological Psychology component students will explore how the brain works, including an introduction to the brain, neural structures and neurons. We will investigate whether parts of our brains serve specialised functions and if there are individual differences in brain structure, in particular associated with handedness. We will also investigate how our understanding of brain function informs our understanding of selected areas of cognition and behaviour.

More information
20 Credits
core
Exam
Coursework

Code: 4PS522

Introduction to Social and Cognitive Psychology

This module has two components: Cognitive, Psychology and Social Psychology. The Cognitive Psychology component of this module introduces students to cognitive psychology as a science. The aim is to provide students with a sound understanding of research into human cognition including areas such as perception, attention, language, memory and thinking, coupled with an awareness of applications of cognitive research to real-world scenarios. Within the Social Psychology component students will explore a range of basic social psychological theories that have been developed to explain our engagement with others such as how attitudes develop; how aggressive or altruistic behaviour can be explained; and how our identities influence the ways we view, and are viewed by, others.
20 Credits
core
Coursework

Code: 5PS509

Quantitative Methods and Individual Differences

This module advances the concepts of quantitative research methods that were introduced to students at Level 4 using the study of individual differences. Students will be introduced to traditional areas and prominent thinkers in the areas of personality and intelligence theory, before moving onto more specific areas of psychology where the differences between individuals has been researched.

Alongside this, students will learn how to design and conduct appropriate experimental and quasi-experimental investigations of a range of individual differences variables. They will also be introduced to elementary scale development for the testing of individual differences within psychology.

More information
20 Credits
core
Coursework

Code: 5PS532

Skills and Careers in Psychology II

This free standing module is a zero-credit module that is core for all single honours psychology students, prescribed for major pathway joint honours psychology students, and optional for joint and minor JHS psychology students and will be assessed using a pass/fail element.

The module and assessment fulfils the Personal Development Planning (PDP) requirements of the programme for Level 5. It will provide students with academic, careers and employability support throughout the second year of their degree. The learning materials will cover skills within the graduate framework (e.g. Higher Education Academy; Graduate Employment 2010 and Future Fit, CBI 2009).

This module moves on from its level 4 predecessor, by building more advanced academic skills, such as critical thinking and advanced research methods. The careers workshops focus more specifically on career paths available and practical support. The module as a whole will focus on developing the student as a professional.

More information
0 Credits
core

Code: 5PS534

Biological and Developmental Psychology

This module has two components, Biological Psychology and Developmental Psychology. The Biological component of this module aims to provide students with a critical understanding of the relationship between brain functioning and behaviour.

Students will examine the biological bases of a range of behaviours and will consider how research in biological psychology can contribute to the understanding of psychological function. This component of the module is delivered through a mix of lectures, seminars, workshops/online materials and activities, and discussion.

The Developmental component of this module aims to further develop students’ understanding of psychological concepts, theories and methods relevant to the study of lifespan developmental psychology. During this section of the module students will explore a range of research relating to cognitive and social development throughout the lifespan and develop the skills needed to evaluate existing research. This component of the module may be delivered through a mix of lectures, seminars, workshops/online materials and activities, and discussion.

Both components will be assessed by a single exam.

More information
20 Credits
core
Exam

Code: 5PS535

Social and Cognitive Psychology

This module will address key debates in cognitive and social psychology. The module will consider how we perceive and process information, how our cognitions help us make sense of our surroundings, how we interact with others and how those interactions are understood and managed.

Teaching on the module will move from a consideration of psychology at an individual level with the focus on cognitive processes to social psychology in which the role of social contexts and processes is considered. In the social psychology sessions we will introduce a range of theories relating to social processes and explore social life as it is enacted in contemporary, everyday contexts. Within both cognitive and social psychology we will explore a range of theoretical and methodological perspectives and will demonstrate some of the contrasts and connections between these two approaches to psychology.

More information
20 Credits
core
Practical
Coursework

Code: 5PS536

Qualitative Methods: The Individual in Society

This module introduces a range of qualitative methods used within contemporary psychology and explores the different insights these approaches bring to the area of individual differences. The module will be divided into sections which each introduce a different qualitative method. In addition, the underlying assumptions which inform psychological research into individual differences such as gender, identity, health and so on are examined.

The range of philosophical orientations and methodological approaches covered in the module enables students to consider the ways in which the individual and their engagement with the social world can be explored from a qualitative perspective. This module also provides students with an opportunity to engage with an employment (or voluntary) experience.

More information
20 Credits
core
Coursework

Code: 5PS500

Psychopathology: Diagnosis, Treatment and Issues

The module aims to develop in students a critical understanding of the main forms of mental illness from a psychological perspective. The module provides students with an understanding of the key features of a variety of disorders and examines the contribution psychological approaches make to the theories, research, diagnosis and treatment of abnormal behaviour.
20 Credits
optional
Practical
Coursework

Code: 5PS501

Anomalistic Psychology and Parapsychology

This module we will explore a number of phenomena that are not part of mainstream psychology teaching but which are of interest to psychologists. The main focus of such phenomena is that they do not fit in with everyday definitions and explanations of ‘normality’ but by the same token are not typically characteristic of a mental disorder on the part of the person experiencing the phenomenon.

The module will look at trying to define these anomalous phenomena that should rightly be included under this umbrella term. It will explore how an understanding of these phenomena requires an understanding of some central philosophical debates about mind and nature and investigate the history of research into this area, particularly focussing upon parapsychological research. Another key consideration is the efforts that have been made to invent an investigative methodology that guards against fraudulent accounts. Other sessions provide a critical analysis of the some of the main areas of anomalistic psychology and parapsychological research, including, extrasensory perception (ESP), precognition, psychokinesis (PK), altered experiences and apparitional experiences.

More information
20 Credits
optional

Code: 5PS505

Cyberpsychology

Cyberpsychology can be defined as the study of behaviour in the context of the relationship between humans and technology. This module focuses on the impact of the Internet on the psychology of individuals and groups. The topics of video gaming, social networking, the use of technology for learning and teaching will also be covered in this module. This module will examine online internet behaviour, identity on the internet, social networking site use and the psychology of the internet in general.
20 Credits
optional
Coursework

Code: 5PS511

The Psychology of Health

The module builds on and develops knowledge gained through the study of core psychology at level 4 and its application to the study of health and illness. Health psychology is one of the fastest growing disciplines in psychology. This module will explore the key theoretical concepts that underpin the discipline and introduce students to the main models and theories that health psychologists use to explain the experience of health and illness.
20 Credits
optional
Coursework

Code: 5PS524

Psychology, Nature and Wellbeing

Reconnecting people with nature has been the focus of several recent high profile national and global campaigns owing to the state of nature, the links to pro-environmental behavior and the benefits to human health and well-being. Given the acknowledged benefits and campaign interest, there is a need to understand the human relationship to the natural world from a psychological perspective in order to engage people with nature.

Through activities in the classroom and local green spaces, students on this module will consider what it means to be human and our place in the natural world. Initially students will discover and discuss the nature of self, theories of human–nature relationships and the benefits of nature, for both people and the planet. The focus will then progress to applications of this knowledge, psychological research and interventions that might engage people with nature in a variety of ways. Students will also consider elements of environmental psychology and the impact on of different environments on psychological wellbeing.

More information
20 Credits
optional
Practical
Coursework

Code: 5SO503

Sport and Exercise Psychology

This module provides an overview of various sport and exercise psychology topics at an intermediate undergraduate level. The significant role of individual characteristics and social processes when designing interventions to enhance sport performance and exercise participation is explained. The module focuses on how psychology can be used by sport and exercise psychologists to enhance performance and physical activity.
20 Credits
optional
Practical
Coursework

Code: 5SO528

Applied Professional Practice

This module provides a framework for the development of “lifelong learning” skills appropriate to all areas of professional practice; including objective setting, planning, negotiating, implementing, demonstrating and reflecting. The emphasis in this module is on the analysis and evaluation of the work completed within the organisation. This module also gives students an opportunity to relate their academic knowledge to the work environment.
40 Credits
core
Coursework

Code: 5SO529

Contemporary Issues in Professional Practice

Students need to be aware of the commercial realities and external factors that influence the success of an organisation. This module provides opportunities for students to acquire an understanding of contemporary issues that may impact on industrial and professional practices relevant to a career within their chosen discipline.

During this period of work experience, students can gain a deeper appreciation of the responsibilities arising from both corporate and individual responses to such issues, thus enabling them to relate to the wider world when exploring a personal direction for potential career development.

More information
20 Credits
core
Coursework

Code: 6PS541

Independent Study in Psychology

This module represents the culmination of students’ training in psychological research methods, and allows students to put into practice research skills acquired at Levels 4 and 5. Under academic supervision, students identify a research issue in an area of psychology of their choosing, formulate meaningful research questions and/or hypotheses, select appropriate methods, collect and analyse empirical data, and write up the study in a scientific report. In addition, students prepare for graduate employment and/or postgraduate training by reflecting on and articulating the personal and transferable skills they have developed across their studies.
40 Credits
core
Coursework

Code: 6PS500

Addictive Behaviours

The module critically examines contemporary psychological approaches to the understanding of substance use and addiction. Students will consider the relative contributions of psychological theories from the fields of biological, behavioural, social and cognitive psychology to understanding, treatment and prevention of addictions, including those not involving consumption of substances.
20 Credits
optional
Coursework

Code: 6PS502

Atypical Language Development

The module builds on and develops knowledge gained through the study of developmental and cognitive psychology at levels 4 and 5. Children typically acquire their mother tongue fairly quickly and without any great apparent effort. We will critically discuss notions of “typical” language development and focus on research into children who acquire language in atypical ways or in atypical contexts.

Students will be encouraged to develop a critical understanding of multiple theoretical and methodological perspectives and of practical approaches to atypical language development. Implications for other areas of child development will be explored and consequences for prevention and intervention will be discussed.

More information
20 Credits
optional
Coursework

Code: 6PS503

Autism, Asperger’s and ADHD

This module introduces three major interrelated childhood developmental disorders. Students will be encouraged to consider the often fine-lines between Autistic Disorders, Asperger’s Disorder and the subtypes of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder. The module draws heavily on a wealth of fascinating research and theory but also considers the individual experience and characteristics of people with these diagnoses.

Topics might covered include, social and communication impairment, theory of mind, weak central coherence theory and executive dysfunction, savant ability, behavioural and pharmacological treatment, classification, diagnosis and developmental outcomes. The module is presented in a series of lectures and seminars where students can develop an understanding of these conditions. Students will also have the opportunity to meet and learn from practitioners working in the field of Autism, Asperger’s and ADHD.

More information
20 Credits
optional
Exam

Code: 6PS504

Clinical Applications of Psychology

The module builds on and develops knowledge gained through the study of core psychology at levels 4 and 5 and its application in an applied context. This module is designed to develop students’ understanding of the application of psychological theory and research in practise. The module will focus on the three professional areas of psychology (clinical, health and counselling) that are concerned with the psychological health and well-being of individuals.

Students will be introduced to the generic skills required of psychologists working in these areas before exploring the application of psychological theory and research to understanding the psychological components of a range of clinically relevant topics. The use of psychologically-based assessments, interventions and therapies appropriate to specific populations and clinical issues will also be examined.

More information
20 Credits
optional
Coursework

Code: 6PS505

Psychology in Education

The module is about how psychology applies to education. This means the application of psychological theory, research and methods to educational processes and settings. The module therefore has a strongly applied emphasis. It will look at a range of educational settings, from primary to higher education.

It is designed with students in mind who may progress to postgraduate training to qualify as teachers or educational psychologists, or who may work in educational settings (eg as teaching assistants). It is also designed to be attractive to joint honours students combining psychology and education, as well as those with a strong interest in education and applied psychology.

More information
20 Credits
optional
Coursework

Code: 6PS506

Emotion in Context

Have you ever wondered to what extent emotion influences your daily functioning; from what you perceive, to the way you feel and/or perform, to the day-to-day decisions you make? In this module we will investigate ‘emotion in context’ and how our emotions influence behaviour.

Once introduced to the field of emotion research in general, the module will encompass topics such as affect & attention, affect & reasoning, affect & performance, and the social construction of emotion including effects on identity and relationship development. Moreover, we will consider the biological basis of emotion and what brain imaging research has revealed concerning the neural correlates of emotion processing in the healthy human brain as well as those with a history of psychopathy/affective disorders.

More information
20 Credits
optional
Coursework

Code: 6PS508

Forensic Applications of Psychology

The module will give students a thorough introduction to the application of psychology to our understanding of criminal behaviour and the criminal justice system. The module will be divided into two sections.

The first will examine psychologically oriented explanations of criminal behaviour. The second will focus on police investigation and judicial processes. Students will leave the module with a rounded understanding of how psychology has been applied, and can further be applied, to the criminal justice system and explanations of crime and offender behaviour.

More information
20 Credits
optional
Exam

Code: 6PS509

Human Behaviour and Evolution

Evolutionary psychology is a new and rapidly developing area which attempts to situate explanations for human behaviour within a Darwinian framework. This module will critically examine the utility of evolutionary principles as a causal explanation for behaviours including an understanding of its theoretical and methodological underpinnings.

The module will explore how evolutionary theory can be used to understand human psychology across a wide range of behaviours such as co-operation, aggression, group living and religious belief. The module takes a very student led approach; with the basic principles of evolutionary psychology being introduced as lectures in the first weeks of teaching, following which all learning takes the form of formal debates.

More information
20 Credits
optional
Practical
Coursework

Code: 6PS510

Neuropsychology

Neuropsychology deals with the problems that arise from brain injury that affects cognitive functioning. This module looks at the biological and cognitive consequences of a number of conditions and analyses the knowledge we have at present and what that knowledge tells us about the normally functioning brain.

This module will explore a number of conceptual issues within the context of neuropsychological disorders. Issues covered will include, population sizes, methodologies, recovery of function, remediation versus research, normal versus abnormal deficits, and lesion sites. These issues will be illustrated through the exploration of visual agnosia, amnesia, blindsight, and ageing. The module will combine the acquisition of knowledge with the skill of delivering that knowledge appropriately to a named target audience.

More information
20 Credits
optional
Coursework

Code: 6PS513

The Dark Side of Psychology

This module explores the dark and hidden history of psychology which is often neglected in conventional textbooks. An investigation of the history of psychology examines the claim that psychology is a science by exploring the epistemological and methodological development of the discipline.

Psychology’s claim to be an objective science is critically examined with an exploration of topics such as scientific racism and sexism. Key figures in psychology and related areas such as the eugenics movement will be discussed. Furthermore, this module explores the ways in which psychology has been used to legitimise the oppression of certain groups within society.

More information
20 Credits
optional
Coursework

Code: 6PS514

The Psychology of Pain

The experience of pain cannot be captured in physiological terms alone and in recent years psychology has made an enormous contribution to the understanding of pain, the impact it has on people’s lives and how it might successfully be managed.

This module will explore and integrate current theory and research in key areas of pain and pain management from a psychological perspective. This module will explore the neurobiological and psychosocial underpinnings of pain perception and expression including cognition, emotion and culture. The relationship between pain and injury, illness, disease and other human experiences (e.g. labour pain) will be discussed. Pain assessment and evaluation will be explored and psychological approaches to the treatment and management of pain will be described.

More information
20 Credits
optional
Coursework

Code: 6PS515

The Psychology of Rationality

The purpose of this module is to provide students with an understanding of psychological perspectives on rational thinking reasoning and decision making. We will consider theoretical approaches and experimental studies that have contributed to the understanding of human rationality. Essentially, we will examine psychological accounts of how it is possible that we as a species have put men on the moon, invented logic, science and law, yet demonstrate illogical, irrational and risky thinking in the psychology laboratory and in the real world.
20 Credits
optional
Coursework

Code: 6PS537

Work Readiness

This module aims to enhance your employability by offering you the opportunity to volunteer to organise an event (from a list of options) within the University as part of a team of Work Readiness students. Alongside this direct work experience, you will undertake skills training in order to enhance your CV and readiness for the workplace. Students with an exceptional record of attendance and punctuality, who pass the module, will also be awarded a Certificate of Work Readiness.
20 Credits
optional
Coursework

Code: 6PS542

Family Health Across the Lifespan

This module aims to develop students’ critical understanding of psychological concepts, theories, and methods relevant to the study of Family Health Psychology. The module will provide students with an understanding of the range of research conducted in this area, and with the skills necessary to evaluate existing research regarding the prevention and/or management of health related issues; applied to real-world settings across the lifespan, and within the context of the family.
20 Credits
optional
Coursework

Please note that our modules are subject to change - we review the content of our courses regularly, making changes where necessary to improve your experience and graduate prospects.

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Live Subject Chats

Join us on Saturday 28 November for a day of Live Subject Chats. You’ll be able to ask our teaching team questions about the courses we offer, speak to Admissions advisors about applying and chat to current students about their experience.

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How you will learn

Teaching and learning

Building on our enthusiasm for psychology, we are committed to making your degree as interesting and enjoyable as possible. We offer interactive teaching sessions including lectures, small group seminars, practical workshops and innovative use of the web to ensure you learn in the most effective way. Quality inspectors have commended us for being “at the forefront of technology-enhanced learning” and you will make full use of online resources such as our virtual learning environment.

We dedicate time and effort to ensure you have the right level of support to succeed at every stage of the course, especially through our programme of academic facilitation sessions. We pride ourselves on being responsive, approachable and available to meet your learning needs through a variety of support systems at departmental and University levels.

Assessment

We use a variety of assessment methods, including essays, exams, posters, presentations, and reports. Our assessments enable you to develop a wide range of transferable skills. You’ll mainly be assessed through assignments, although you may have to take some class tests. For your assignments, you'll need to complete essays on specific topics, but you'll also carry out and write up practical reports in qualitative and quantitative methods and give oral and poster presentations. In exams, you would usually be asked to complete essay questions. However, sometimes exams will include multiple choice and/or short answer questions.

Personal academic tutoring

Your personal academic tutor will work with you to help you get the most out of your time at university. Having someone to talk to about your academic progress, your university experience and your professional aspirations is hugely valuable. We want you to feel challenged in your studies, stretched but confident to achieve your academic and professional goals.

Find out more about personal academic tutoring

Who will teach you

Dr Ian Baker
Programme leader

Dr Baker is the Programme Leader for our BSc (Hons) Psychology degree. He is also the Module Leader for Quantitative Methods & Individual Differences and Anomalistic Psychology & Parapsychology. 

View full staff profileView full staff profile

Entry requirements

September 2021 typical entry requirements

RequirementWhat we're looking for
UCAS points128
Specific requirements at A-level

No specific subject requirements

Specific requirements at GCSEGCSE Maths and English Grade 4/Grade C (or above) or equivalent qualification
IELTS6.0 (with 5.5 in each skills area)
Interview / AuditionN/A
PortfolioN/A

Alternative entry qualifications

We usually consider an A-level in General Studies as a supplementary qualification. A good application/performance will be taken into account if you do not meet the criteria/offer conditions.

Our entry requirements for this course should be read together with the University's general entry requirements, which details subjects we accept, alternative qualifications and what we're looking for at Derby.

Fees and funding

2020/21 Fees

 Full-timePart-time
UK/EU

£9,250 per year

£1,155 per 20 credit module

International

£14,045 per year

N/A

Further information about our fees and support you may be entitled to.

Additional costs and optional extras

How to apply

UK/EU students

Full-time students applying to start in September should apply for this course through UCAS.

Part-time students should apply directly to the University.

Apply through UCASApply directly to the University

Guidance for EU students post-Brexit

Careers

“The pleasure in teaching psychology students is that they tend to be highly motivated and open to exploring ideas. A vital part of our role is to help them chart their future career direction as studying psychology opens so many doors to so many different sectors and professions – anywhere that an understanding of people is valued.” Dr Ian Baker - Programme Leader, BSc (Hons) Psychology

Psychological knowledge is invaluable in many walks of life, so your career options will be broad. Our graduates have gone on to successful roles in sectors such as:

Through our Professional Development Package, you'll gain valuable transferable skills, including:

This course also prepares you for further training in psychology and provides an essential platform if you would like to become a professional psychologist. You could go on to masters level study with the University of Derby, including our MSc Behaviour ChangeMSc Applied Developmental PsychologyMRes Psychology or MSc Health Psychology. As an accredited course, the MSc Health Psychology will take you further down the route towards becoming a chartered member of the BPS.

Some of our graduates have advanced to qualify in areas such as clinical and educational psychology or have embarked on PhD study.

Careers and Employment Service

To boost your employment skills, you can access the University's Careers and Employment Service. The team can connect you with employers to help find opportunities for work placements, part-time jobs, and volunteering. Our careers consultants are also on hand to guide you through the career options for your degree, CV writing, or starting your own business - and we commit to helping you for three years after you graduate to find a job. 

Contact us

If you need any more information from us, eg on courses, accommodation, applying, car parking, fees or funding, please contact us and we will do everything we can to help you.

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Additional information about your studies

Teaching hours

Like most universities, we operate extended teaching hours at the University of Derby, so contact time with your lecturers and tutors could be anytime between 9am and 9pm. Your timetable will usually be available on the website 24 hours after enrolment on to your course.

Additional costs and optional extras

We’re committed to providing you with an outstanding learning experience. Our expert teaching, excellent facilities and great employability prepare you for your future career. As part of our commitment to you we aim to keep any additional study costs to a minimum. However, there are occasions where students may incur some additional costs.

The information below is correct for entry in the academic year September 2020 - August 2021 only. Entry for future academic years may be subject to change.

Included in your fees

Optional costs not included in your fees

Please note: Our courses are refreshed and updated on a regular basis. If you are thinking about transferring onto this course (into the second year for example), you should contact the programme leader for the relevant course information as modules may vary from those shown on this page.

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