Apply now for September

Course details

Study options

Full-time: 4 years

UK/EU fee

£9,250 per year* (2020/21)

International fee

£14,045 per year (2020/21)

UCAS points

72 (September 2020 entry)

UCAS code

F412

Course level

Undergraduate

Qualification

BSc (Hons)

Start date

September

Location

Kedleston Road, Derby Campus

Course description

Extend your career scope and enhance your employability on a four-year course which brings together the skills of the forensic scientist and the insights of the criminologist.

The Chartered Society of Forensic Science Accreditation Logo

Charting a new direction in your career? Keen to immerse yourself in stimulating new subjects? If so, this four-year programme – which includes a foundation year – offers a new pathway for you.

Professional Recognition

The high quality of this BSc (Hons) degree is reflected in its accreditations from professional bodies. We have full accreditation from The Chartered Society of Forensic Sciences, which means you can be confident our teaching meets exacting standards. Our Forensic Science courses were praised by the CSFS for their link to industry standards and relevant curriculum, our student-centred approach, employment experience available, our excellent facilities and accessibility for our students to engage with real-life cases.

A strong combination of skills

Studying Criminology alongside Forensic Science will give you a comprehensive knowledge of how cases unfold – from collecting and examining evidence to presenting findings in court.

We take you through the full spectrum of forensic techniques as you investigate mock crime scenes and have the opportunity to develop your skills in fingerprint, drugs, DNA, bodily fluids and blood pattern analysis as well as entomology, anthropology and taphonomy.

At the same time, we broaden your understanding of the criminal justice system and the legal aspects of forensic science. Your studies will span issues such as expert testimony and evidence, miscarriages of justice, the court process and the roles of the judge, jury and witnesses. You’ll also gain practice in delivering findings in court and being cross-examined by barristers.

Foundation Year - helping you to achieve more

Including a foundation year as part of your four-year study programme will give you a head start in your academic and professional life. The foundation year offers the chance to strengthen your skills, knowledge and confidence – with extensive support from our expert staff – before you advance to stage one of your honours degree. It could also be beneficial if you are planning a career change and want to get to grips with aspects of subjects which are new to you.

Our degrees with a foundation year are continuous, meaning that you won’t need to apply again once you have successfully completed the first year.

3rdin the UK for student satisfaction with teaching**Guardian University Guide 2020
Forensic science students studying fingerprints

Forensic Training Facility

This custom built facility offers seven replica domestic and commercial crime scenes, a blood spatter room and fully panoramic CCTV and audio for live feedback.

Take a virtual tourTake a virtual tour

Hands-on experience in our superb facilities

As part of your studies, you will investigate a variety of crime scenarios while developing the laboratory skills which are critical to the work of the forensic scientist.

A highlight of the course is the chance to put your practical know-how to the test in our custom-designed  and with our two crime scene cars, kindly donated by Toyota Manufacturing UK.

The house can be adapted to show the aftermath of crimes in different domestic and commercial settings, including a bedroom, lounge, garage, office, and commercial premises such as a pharmacy or pub. Also featuring a blood pattern analysis room, it is fitted with digital surveillance including panoramic CCTV and equipment for two-way audio recording and feedback so that tutors can monitor your progress in real time from a control room.

Our specialist forensic, biological and chemical laboratories also provide the ideal setting to expand your practical scientific skills and get to grips with leading-edge instrumentation. You will also have access to our well-equipped imaging suite and insectary.

Thriving employer links

We work hard to make your learning experience as authentic as possible, so we call on our numerous contacts within the forensic science and criminal justice sectors to contribute to the course. From workplace visits and placement opportunities to masterclasses and real-life case studies, they help place your learning in a professional context. There is even the opportunity to observe a post mortem.

Our partnerships include longstanding alliances with Derbyshire Constabulary, Derbyshire Fire and Rescue Service and the East Midlands Scientific Operations Unit (EMSOU). You could apply to undertake a placement with EMSOU in their forensic imaging unit, footwear unit, forensic analytical service or scenes of crime team.

Pursue your own areas of interest

While you’ll cover all the core areas of forensic science and criminology, you can also ‘personalise’ your degree to tailor your studies to your career plans. We offer fascinating optional modules for you to choose from, so you can focus your studies on areas as diverse as forensic anthropology, victimology, toxicology and the human genome.

We support you to share your research through high-profile conferences or forensic journals. Such activities can raise your profile as a talent of the future, helping you to stand out in a highly competitive job market. 

Our students and graduates have gone on to win prestigious awards from organisations like FIRN, Royal Society of Chemistry and the Fingerprint Society, or to present innovative projects at the Houses of Parliament.

Learn from prominent researchers

Our dynamic and forward-thinking teaching team includes forensic scientists, criminology specialists, practising lawyers, barristers and judges, so you can look forward to a stimulating study experience. They are supported by visiting speakers who will give you insights into the latest debates surrounding forensics and criminology, plus guidance to help you make informed decisions about your career.

You’ll be joining a University with an enviable reputation for research in this field. Our team is pursuing innovative studies into highly topical subjects such as entomology, forensic photography, anthropology, taphonomy, drug analysis, fingerprint detection and enhancement techniques, blood pattern analysis and fire investigations.

Sanita Nezirovic, Leader in Forensic Science with Criminology, discusses her involvement, as an anthropologist, in profiling a Bronze Age skeleton recently discovered in Northumbria

What you will study

Foundation YearFoundation YearYear 1Year 1Year 2Year 2Optional Placement YearOptional Placement YearYear 3Year 3

Code: 3EV501

Study Skills in Science

This module aims to develop the study skills essential for study at university and facilitate the transition into Higher Education. The module will help student understand university systems and processes, the study skills they require to succeed and the role they have in their own learning.
20 Credits
core
Coursework

Code: 3FO500

Foundation in Forensic Science

This module offers an introduction to the fields of forensic science and crime scene investigation. Students will gain an understanding of forensic investigation and the processes by which forensic scientists analyse evidence. Students will learn about the differences between the roles of crime scene investigators and forensic scientists; the management and processing of crime scenes and the different types of forensic evidence that can be encountered by both groups.
20 Credits
core
Coursework

Code: 3FO502

Principles of Cellular Biology

This module will introduce the key concepts that underpin biological sciences. It will provide students with a theoretical understanding of the fundamental bioscience areas of cellular biology, biochemistry and genetics. It will also introduce students to how biotechnology is informing our current knowledge of the regulation of cellular mechanisms. The module will also incorporate practical learning to enable students to apply their bioscience knowledge.
20 Credits
core
Coursework

Code: 3FO503

Principles of Chemistry

This module aims to gives students an overview of some of the basic chemical principles that form the foundations of chemistry. Students will learn about the fundamental building blocks of chemistry, exploring the states of matter, its structure and organisation. Student will gain an understanding of the chemical principles of interactions and reactions at the atomic level. Students will then explore fundamental chemistry which underpins applied fields such as forensic science and biology.
20 Credits
core
Coursework

Code: 2MO500

English

This is a level 2 module. The module is oriented towards providing students with sufficient English skills to enable them to engage confidently with level 4 modules.
20 Credits
optional
Coursework

Code: 2MO501

Mathematics

The course is equivalent to GCSE Maths and covers statistics and probability, number work, geometry, and algebra and graphs.
20 Credits
optional
Exam
Coursework

Code: 3EV500

Research Methods and Data Handling

This module aims to develop an understanding of why and how research is conducted within science disciplines. Students will develop a working knowledge of both quantitative and qualitative data handling skills through the use of Excel and other appropriate software. Introductions to formulating and operationalising research questions and hypotheses will be included along with an exploration of the rationale behind applying different research methods for different purposes and the ethical considerations linked to these.
20 Credits
optional
Coursework

Code: 3FO501

Fundamentals of Human Anatomy and Physiology

This module will provide students with a theoretical understanding of physiology and anatomy of the relevant body systems. Fundamental anatomical and physiological concepts will be explored for a range of body systems in relation to what these systems consist of and how they function. The concepts of health and disease will be introduced as the range of body systems are explored. The module will incorporate both theoretical and practical learning to enable students to apply their knowledge of the human body.
20 Credits
optional
Coursework

Code: 3FO501

Fundamentals of Human Anatomy and Physiology

This module will provide students with a theoretical understanding of physiology and anatomy of the relevant body systems. Fundamental anatomical and physiological concepts will be explored for a range of body systems in relation to what these systems consist of and how they function. The concepts of health and disease will be introduced as the range of body systems are explored. The module will incorporate both theoretical and practical learning to enable students to apply their knowledge of the human body.
20 Credits
optional
Coursework

Code: 4BY505

Genetics

Since the full elucidation of DNA structure in 1952 our knowledge in the field of genetics has increased exponentially. The development of molecular techniques means that genetics now has the capacity to impact on almost all areas of human life. Medical testing, conservation work and criminal investigation are three diverse examples of areas that in which genetics plays a major role. Knowledge of such a significant area is thus a pre-requisite for all biological and forensic based study. The module aims to provide a broad introduction to, and basic understanding of, the key concepts in classical and molecular genetics. The module also addresses the role of genetics in society and some of the ethical issues that surround its use.
20 Credits
core
Exam
Coursework

Code: 4BY508

Chemistry of Life

This module introduces key concepts essential to the understanding of biological and biochemical structures and processes at an atomic, molecular and cellular level. The basic skills required to understand and interpret the behaviour of biological and chemical materials, both qualitatively and quantitatively, will be covered. This module provides a comprehensive introduction to the cell, both prokaryotic and eukaryotic, along with the basic biochemistry of carbohydrates and lipids.
20 Credits
core
Exam
Coursework

Code: 4FO500

Introduction to Crime Scene Investigation

Introduction to the fundamental concepts, techniques and processes used in the examination, documentation and analysis of the crime scene and specialist examinations. Basic understanding of the key roles of personnel and specialists present at the crime scene. Practical experience of examination, documentation and retrieval methods from mock crime scene scenarios.
20 Credits
core
Coursework

Code: 4FO501

Introduction to Forensic Chemistry

This module starts by introducing some more advanced organic structures and aspects of Nomenclature as applied to these organic compounds. Also covered in this module are characteristic structures and behaviour of acids, bases, reductants and oxidants. Kinetic and thermodynamic factors that control important chemical reactions are covered as is characteristic functional group chemistry. The module touches on a selected range of important organic reactions including the mechanisms of reaction. The materials are presented in a forensically interesting and relevant context. Methods of analysis such as spectroscopy and chromatography are then introduced and discussed with reference to case studies of forensic interest.
20 Credits
core
Exam
Coursework

Code: 4FO502

Introduction to Forensic Science

The module will provide student with broad introductions to the fundamental concepts, techniques and processes used in the collection, processing, analysis and storage of forensic evidence and data. Students will also develop a rigorous approach to the acquisition of a broad knowledge base within forensic science. Students will employ a range of specialised skills; evaluate observed and acquired information using it to plan and develop investigative strategies and to determine solutions to a variety of unpredictable problems. Introduction to forensic biology including human tissue analysis, biological trace evidence, hair and fibre analysis, fingerprints and the ethical considerations involved when dealing with forensic evidence. In addition, students will develop an understanding of the basic laboratory skills including microscopy, undertaking appropriate anti-contamination procedures, note taking and report writing.
20 Credits
core
Exam

Code: 4FO503

Law, Criminology and Criminal Justice for Forensic Science

The role of Forensic Science and the Forensic Scientist is predominantly focused towards the later stages of criminal Investigation. Understanding the full context of English Criminal Justice therefore, including the various bodies and organisations that contribute to this system is of paramount importance. Criminal law and Criminal legislation including Parliaments role in introducing new bills, the Police and Crown Prosecution Service are examples of areas where forensic science plays a role. Knowledge of such significant areas is thus pre-requisites for all forensic and forensic with criminology based studies.

The module aims to provide a broad introduction to, and basic understanding of, the structure of the English Criminal Justice system, including the Police, the Courts and the role of Forensic Scientist as Expert Witness. In addition, students will also research introductory concepts on the basis and response of criminality and criminal behaviour. The module also introduces the role of statistics to support the evaluation of evidence that a practicing forensic scientist would be expected to use in their casework interpretation.

More information
20 Credits
core
Coursework

Code: 5BY509

Molecular Biology

The Molecular Biology module builds directly on a range of aspects of genetics covered in the first year modules; particularly ‘Genetics’ and ‘Chemistry for Life’. The module also provides direct support to a wide range of material that will be covered in both biological and forensic modules in the third year. The module covers both theoretical and practical aspects of evolutionary and forensic genetics. A range of skills will be developed which are directly relevant to the workplace.
20 Credits
core
Coursework

Code: 5CJ518

Policing and Society

Ethical policing has become an increasingly important subject for debate. The police, like other criminal justice agencies, have a responsibility to safeguard the rule of law. Equally, policing in the UK is premised upon the support and confidence of the public, and their position of authority requires the police to take into account the fundamental rights and freedoms of the individual. This module deals with the concepts, debates, literature and research relating to police ethics. We will develop a systematic understanding of the ways in which policing is, and can be, practised. Throughout the programme the use of case studies and scenarios will help provide the backdrop of theoretical and academic discussion. The module particularly develops knowledge of how police ethics and principles of policing related to the practice of criminal investigation and to concepts of policing by consent.
20 Credits
core
Coursework

Code: 5FO501

Crime Scene to Court

Professionalism is at the core of forensic practitioners working practice. In this module students will develop the skills necessary for the investigation of the crime scenes and the presentation of this evidence in a court room scenario. The module develops an understanding of the importance of making informed decisions and appropriate judgements in the application of forensic science at all stages of the criminal justice system. Students will be expected to demonstrate competence in strategy and techniques in the collection, analysis and presentation of evidence from a realistic crime scene scenario. Students will undertake a period of real-world experience to develop their fundamental graduate skills such as oral and written communication, teamwork and problem solving. These skills will be applied in the student’s journey to professional employment.
20 Credits
core
Practical
Coursework

Code: 5FO505

Trace Evidence

This module gives the student insight into how trace evidence is used in forensic investigation. It will build on the knowledge learned at level 4 and cover various fields of trace evidence collection and analysis. Each session will provide the student with theoretical knowledge and hands-on experience and generate data so that different types of forensic evidence can be analysed appropriately through either calculations, probability, or statistics.
20 Credits
core
Coursework

Code: 5FO507

Preparing for Independent Research

The module will prepare students for their Independent Studies research project undertaken at level 6 and deliver important information regarding research design and ethics. Students will receive guidance on how to plan and propose a piece of independent research and complete the University Research Ethics proposal form.
0 Credits
core
Coursework

Code: 5CR506

Victimology

Victims of crime attract unprecedented academic interest, both as a subject of psychological enquiry, and as a focus of criminal justice policy. Since the 1960s, victimisation surveys have aimed to quantify the unreported ‘dark figure’ of crime and have thus helped to build interest in this area. The need to protect the rights of victims has become increasingly important in terms of public opinion and judicial practice. This has given rise to revisions in sentencing and the advent of restorative justice. The rights of victims are now viewed as an integral part of criminal justice. Whilst societal views and criminal justice responses have impacted upon victims and their status, it is of importance to understand the physical, social, psychological and emotional effects they might face in context of the primary offence. Therefore, both societal and psychological effects will therefore be explored within this module.
20 Credits
optional
Coursework

Code: 5FO502

Forensic Analysis

This module introduces the core analytical techniques used in the identification of compounds and substances of forensic interest. The principles of spectroscopic and chromatographic methods are discussed, along with their application to the qualitative and quantitative analysis of various materials. The structure and composition of a range of materials of forensic interest are examined. The practical considerations which need to be made when undertaking chemical analyses of a forensic nature will be explored, with emphasis on both technique selection and data interpretation.
20 Credits
optional
Exam
Coursework

Code: 5FO503

Forensic Anthropology

Using skeletal remains to assist in human identification is an important area of practice for the Forensic Scientist and involves a variety of theories and methods focusing on the wider scope of human skeletal biology on issues of medico-legal significance. This module provides an introduction to the practice of Forensic Anthropology. Through a series of lectures and practical lab sessions, you will learn about methods of bioprofiling used by forensic anthropologists, topics on skeletal biology, disease and trauma that can be observed on bone, and ethical concerns involved when working with human remains in legal contexts.
20 Credits
optional
Coursework

Code: 5FO504

Forensic Imaging

Photography is often described as the ‘scientist’s retina’; this module develops the students ability to use a wide range of imaging scientific techniques and modalities, for example, ultraviolet fluorescence and infrared, as an integral part of their working practice as a forensic scientist to analyse and record forensic evidence.
20 Credits
optional
Practical
Coursework

Code: 5FO506

Wildlife Crime and Forensic Entomology

This module will look at a broad range of topics related to forensic evidence which can be obtained from ecological and wildlife samples. Students will learn about the fields of wildlife crime and wildlife forensics and the accompanying analysis of non-human evidence. Additionally, the module will cover entomological evidence including collection, rearing, identification, and calculation of minimum time since death.
20 Credits
optional
Exam
Coursework

Code: 5SO528

Applied Professional Practice

This module provides a framework for the development of “lifelong learning” skills appropriate to all areas of professional practice; including objective setting, planning, negotiating, implementing, demonstrating and reflecting. The emphasis in this module is on the analysis and evaluation of the work completed within the organisation. This module also gives students an opportunity to relate their academic knowledge to the work environment.
40 Credits
core
Coursework

Code: 5SO529

Contemporary Issues in Professional Practice

Students need to be aware of the commercial realities and external factors that influence the success of an organisation. This module provides opportunities for students to acquire an understanding of contemporary issues that may impact on industrial and professional practices relevant to a career within their chosen discipline.

During this period of work experience, students can gain a deeper appreciation of the responsibilities arising from both corporate and individual responses to such issues, thus enabling them to relate to the wider world when exploring a personal direction for potential career development.

More information
20 Credits
core
Coursework

Code: 6FO502

Professional Practice

In this module, students will develop their abilities to act as a professional forensic scientist in various aspects of the profession. Students will be involved in an active process giving them direct experience of a mock crime; this will include the crime scene, relevant laboratory analyses, the pre-trial conference and a courtroom trial. Students will learn effective statistical and written methods to prepare case file documentation as well as to deliver their scientific findings through the production of an expert witness statement and participate in a mock courtroom trial. Students will also be prepared for the professional world by gaining direct experience through a professional practice visit as well examining relevant careers in the sector, opportunities in further education and professional training routes.

The module aims to provide students with a platform; a culmination of their forensic science training, bringing together the various streams to effectively allow students to demonstrate their understanding from initial crime scene examination through to delivering effective laboratory practice and preparing reports to facilitate them delivering effective opinion based evidence in a courtroom situation.

More information
20 Credits
core
Practical

Code: 6FO504

Miscarriages of Justice for Forensic Science

This module enables you to work in an applied manner with reference to cases of miscarriages of justice (MOJ). You will be working in groups throughout your final year on past and present cases with a view to identifying the causes of MOJ. This module takes a more traditional and theoretical approach to the subject area with reference to historical and current cases. The rationale for this module is to identify common themes and causes of MOJ and to make recommendations for best practice and thus prevent and minimise the number of cases going to appeal.
20 Credits
core
Coursework

Code: 6FO505

Serious and Organised Crime

In this module, students build upon and apply their knowledge of current forensic practice and crime scene evaluation in the investigation of serious and organised crime. Serious and organised crime in this context refers to crime that can result in a custodial sentence of more than a year such as murder, rape, robbery, burglary, kidnapping and fraud. Using recent forensic research, police protocols, guides and criminal law, students will study current approaches and techniques in serious and organised crime investigation, both in general and in a specific self-selected context.
20 Credits
core
Coursework

Code: 6FO999

Independent Studies for Forensic Science

This module presents an opportunity for students to further enhance their technical, analytical and problem solving skills as well as transferable skills such as time management, creativity and the ability to work independently. The student will conduct a research project of their choosing within which they will formulate hypotheses and conduct a methodology suitable to their project. Skills in scientific writing developed through levels 4 and 5 will be used to complete a dissertation as well as the completion of an oral viva in which the student will defend their dissertation.
40 Credits
core
Coursework

Code: 6BY504

The Human Genome

Each of us carries the record of our personal evolutionary history locked up in our genome. Our genome can also influence our future health and longevity. The focus of this module is an investigation into the main components of the Human genome. We also look at the history of the Human Genome Project and the future prospects now that we have the genome sequence in both biological and forensic contexts. Human genome sequence organization is also contrasted with a number of model organisms from bacteria through to other primates. We also look at the DNA sequence databases and how DNA sequence data is deposited, retrieved and manipulated.
20 Credits
optional
Exam
Coursework

Code: 6BY507

Vocational Module

Work experience and volunteering are two important routes to develop a fundamental understanding of issues related to employment within a chosen organisation. This module also has far reaching benefits in terms of providing valuable hands on experience and a platform for developing ideas outside of the taught curriculum. This module provides an opportunity for the student to undertake a placement within a company, voluntary body or public establishment and is designed for Level 6. The student has freedom to select an appropriate host organisation. By placing the module at level 6, the student should be able to undertake a project based on their knowledge and understanding at this higher level.

The project should be selected so as to generate benefit to the host organisation. An integral part of the student experience is the compilation of a report based on deep reflection of personal experiences acquired during the placement. The report should also reflect wider issues such as the objectives, structure and procedures of the host body and the role of volunteers within the organisation. This analysis must be of a depth commensurate with Level 6 study. The placement work must relate to the student’s degree programme but must have clear differentiation from their Independent Study project in respect of either location or topic.

More information
20 Credits
optional
Coursework

Code: 6FO501

Medical Forensics

This module gives the student insight into the processes that occur after death and how they can be used to give temporal, causal and trace evidence in forensic investigation. The interactions between medicine and the law are complex and cover a wide range of specialisations including; the role of the coroner and the pathologist, personal injuries and accidents, pre-peri and post-mortem changes in the body, graves and burial procedures, mass disasters, biometrics and identification as well as the chemical, physical and biological processes involved. The module looks to further develop student thinking and reasoning skills through the use of case studies and simulated scenarios for analysis and offers the opportunity to view a post-mortem.
20 Credits
optional
Coursework

Code: 6FO503

Toxicology and Drugs of Abuse

All substances, if taken in large enough doses, are toxic to humans. This module provides a comprehensive introduction to the multidisciplinary field of toxicology, from the biological and biochemical processes which occur when a poison is administered to the chemical analysis of toxicological samples. While a range of toxins from various sources will be considered, particular emphasis will be placed upon the study of drugs of abuse, including their chemistry, legislation and analysis of both toxicological and non-toxicological samples.
20 Credits
optional
Exam
Coursework

Please note that our modules are subject to change - we review the content of our courses regularly, making changes where necessary to improve your experience and graduate prospects.

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Open Days

Register your interest for a future Open Day and we'll be in touch as soon as we are able to welcome you on campus.

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How you will learn

You’ll use our specialist facilities, including our brand new on-campus Crime Scene House and crime scene cars. You’ll also have the opportunity to observe a post-mortem. You’ll be taught through lectures, practical sessions, fieldtrips, crime scene training and your own study.

How you're assessed

You’ll be assessed through a range of mediums, including, but not limited to, formal witness statements and expert testimony, case studies, essays, laboratory reports, portfolios, examinations and presentations.

Work placements

Between stages 2 and 3 there is the chance to work within the industry for three months to a year. This will give you a unique experience as you enter your final year and will give you a head-start when applying for jobs after university. You will also be given the opportunity to learn alongside industry professionals.

Personal academic tutoring

Your personal academic tutor will work with you to help you get the most out of your time at university. Having someone to talk to about your academic progress, your university experience and your professional aspirations is hugely valuable. We want you to feel challenged in your studies, stretched but confident to achieve your academic and professional goals.

Find out more about personal academic tutoring

Who will teach you

Adam Long conducting a fingerprint examination in the Forensics lab

Adam Long
Programme leader

Adam Long is the Undergraduate Programme Coordinator for Forensic Science at the University of Derby and teaches across all levels, with particular interest and expertise in fingerprints, their capture and comparison. Adam also sits on Governing Council for The Chartered Society of Forensic Science and is the main point of contact for the Fingerprint Working Group.

View full staff profileView full staff profile

Entry requirements

September 2020 typical entry requirements

RequirementWhat we're looking for
UCAS points72 (up to 16 from AS-levels)
Specific requirements at A-levelN/A
Specific requirements at GCSE

GCSE Maths and English are preferred, however if you don't have these qualifications you will be able to undertake Maths and English at L2 as part of your course of study.

IELTS6.0 (with 5.5 in each skills area)
Interview / AuditionN/A
PortfolioN/A

Alternative entry qualifications:

We usually consider an A-level in General Studies as a supplementary qualification. A good application/performance will be taken into account if you do not meet the criteria/offer conditions.

Our entry requirements for this course should be read together with the University's general entry requirements, which details subjects we accept, alternative qualifications and what we're looking for at Derby.

Fees and funding

2020/21 Fees

 Full-timePart-time
UK/EU

£9,250 per year*

N/A

International

£14,045 per year

N/A

* The fees stated above are for the 2019/20 academic year; fees for 2020/21 have not yet been confirmed by the UK government. We will update this information as soon as it is available.

Further information about our fees and support you may be entitled to.

Additional costs and optional extras

How to apply

UK/EU students

Full-time students applying to start in September should apply for this course through UCAS or you can apply directly to the University for an undergraduate course if you’re not applying to any other UK university in the same year.

Apply through UCASApply directly to the University

Guidance for EU students post-Brexit

International students

Full-time students applying to start in September should apply for this course through UCAS or you can apply directly to the University for an undergraduate course if you’re not applying to any other UK university in the same year.

Apply through UCASApply directly to the University

Guidance for international applicants applying for an undergraduate degree

Careers

Our graduates have gone on to realise their career ambitions within the criminal justice system, the police force, the prison service and forensic services. The skills and knowledge you gain on the course will also make you well suited to roles in insurance companies, law firms, pharmaceutical companies and private laboratories.

You could also build on your analytical and research expertise to pursue postgraduate study with an MSc, MPhil or PhD in subjects related to forensic science and criminology. 

Some of our former students have moved into teaching careers within secondary or further education after studying our PGCE Post-14 (Education and Training).

Take a look at the ways in which we enhance your employability.

Contact us

If you need any more information from us, eg on courses, accommodation, applying, car parking, fees or funding, please contact us and we will do everything we can to help you.

Contact us Contact us

Additional information about your studies

Download programme specification

Teaching hours

Like most universities, we operate extended teaching hours at the University of Derby, so contact time with your lecturers and tutors could be anytime between 9am and 9pm. Your timetable will usually be available on the website 24 hours after enrolment on to your course.

Additional costs and optional extras

We’re committed to providing you with an outstanding learning experience. Our expert teaching, excellent facilities and great employability prepare you for your future career. As part of our commitment to you we aim to keep any additional study costs to a minimum. However, there are occasions where students may incur some additional costs.

Included in your fees

Mandatory costs not included in your fees

Optional costs not included in your fees

Please note: Our courses are refreshed and updated on a regular basis. If you are thinking about transferring onto this course (into the second year for example), you should contact the programme leader for the relevant course information as modules may vary from those shown on this page.

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