Course details

Study options

Full-time: 4 years

UK/EU fee

£9,250 per year (2020/21)

International fee

£14,045 per year (2020/21)

UCAS points

72 (September 2021 entry)

UCAS code

V101

Course level

Undergraduate

Qualification

BA (Hons)

Start date

September

Location

Kedleston Road, Derby Campus

This course is available as a Joint Honours degree.

View Joint Honours optionsView Joint Honours options

Course description

History is a subject for anyone with a sense of curiosity and a desire for a deeper understanding of the world around them.

History has the power to make us question who we are, how we have come to act the way we do, and the experiences that have shaped people’s lives in the past. Studying History will turn you into a critical thinker, ready to challenge received wisdoms.

This course provides you with a firm grounding in the skills and knowledge you need and introduces you to the subject of history, enabling you to achieve your full honours degree in four years.

A deep sense of perspective

With particular emphasis on modern and contemporary history, this course is academically rigorous, intellectually stimulating and politically relevant.  As well as covering broad historical themes, you will explore a wide range of specific topics - everything from the Enlightenment, Totalitarianism, the history of the body, and the British Country House.

You will also explore the history of non-European societies, with modules spanning the history of China, India, the Cold War and the impact of European imperial rule.

Explore history outside the classroom

We offer study visits and fieldtrips to bring your learning to life. You will explore the practical and intellectual applications of history in museums, art galleries, country houses, parks and heritage sites.

Recent visits have taken us to the Imperial War Museum, the Victoria and Albert Museum, the city of Chester and the urban heartland of Manchester. And, of course, Derbyshire is the ideal location to study history - with its rich industrial past and thriving heritage industry, including a UNESCO World Heritage site.

Study in America

You can spend part of your second stage in America, experiencing a different academic culture and deepening your global perspectives. You will study at one of our partner universities:

Real world learning

You will use your research and creative skills to interpret the past for the benefit of the wider community. We provide exciting opportunities for projects involving international arts and heritage organisations. Among recent initiatives, our students have worked with Derbyshire County Record Office to encourage young people to take a greater interest in archives and with Derby Theatre, National Brewery Centre and Derby Museum.

You will also inspire others by organising and marketing a public conference and presenting your research to a wider audience. Topics explored at this conference have included the experience of British prisoners-of-war during the First World War, the fight against the Apartheid regime in South Africa, and the pleasure gardens of eighteenth-century London.

90%overall satisfaction - History**National Student Survey 2020

Foundation Year - helping you to achieve more

Including a foundation year as part of your four-year study programme will give you a head start in your academic and professional life. The foundation year offers the chance to strengthen your skills, knowledge and confidence – with extensive support from our expert staff – before you advance to stage one of your honours degree. It could also be beneficial if you are planning a career change and want to get to grips with aspects of subjects which are new to you.

Our degrees with a foundation year are continuous, meaning that you won’t need to apply again once you have successfully completed the first year.

What you will study

Foundation YearFoundation YearYear 1Year 1Year 2Year 2Year 3Year 3

Code: 3ES501

Literature

This module will provide you with the skills of literary criticism required for the analysis of texts. These critical skills will be applied to a variety of literary forms, including poetry, novels, and short stories, from a range of historical periods. The module will also look at drama, including an in-depth study of a Shakespeare play.
20 Credits
core
Practical
Coursework

Code: 3HU502

Study Skills

This module will introduce you to the academic skills needed for study at undergraduate level, and enable you to plan for both your future study and your career. The focus of the module is developing the analytical and critical skills essential to studying humanities and social science subjects at degree level.
20 Credits
core
Coursework

Code: 3HU503

Creative Project

This module allows students to contribute collectively and severally to the design, development and production of a creative project that is relevant to Humanities, Journalism, or the creative and cultural industries more generally. Typically students will spend the first weeks of the module developing and discussing their ideas and negotiating with their tutor(s) about the nature, content, and scope of their chosen project.

Students will then work in groups and individually on aspects of the project, including tasks such as research, writing, designing, illustrating, editing, publishing or posting online of the creative output they have worked upon. Toward the end of the module students and tutors will work together to complete and finalise the output(s), while tutors will support students to reflect and write about the experience, and the learning they have derived from it.

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20 Credits
core
Practical
Coursework

Code: 3HY501

History

This module introduces you to the key methodologies used by historians to understand and explore the past. Using British History 1870-1914 as a particular focus the module explores the primary sources, historiographical debates, and approaches used by historians in order to understand this period. The module is designed to help you develop key research skills, critical thinking skills, and the ability to create a persuasive argument.
20 Credits
core
Practical
Coursework

Code: 2MO500

English

This is a level 2 module. The module is oriented towards providing students with sufficient English skills to enable them to engage confidently with level 4 modules.
20 Credits
optional
Coursework

Code: 2MO501

Mathematics

The course is equivalent to GCSE Maths and covers statistics and probability, number work, geometry, and algebra and graphs.
20 Credits
optional
Exam
Coursework

Code: 3HU504

Culture and Ideas

This wide-ranging module introduces and explains the cultural, philosophical, artistic and historical evolution and development of society over approximately the last 3,000 years.

Focusing principally on western Europe from ancient Egypt, Greece and Rome to the present day, but encompassing a range of world civilisations, religions and philosophies, the module’s teaching will give students a clear framework and contextual understanding of some of the main trends, developments and historical concepts that collectively underpin the values, mores and ethics of modern society, as well as giving students a general foundational understanding of the political, artistic, cultural and historical trends that are important for an understanding of today’s world

 

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20 Credits
optional
Coursework

Code: 3PO501

Political Studies

This module will introduce you to a range of key issues and approaches taken in the study of Politics at undergraduate level. Understanding Politics as the study of competing interests within society, the module addresses questions such as the differences between - and the different forms taken by - democratic, totalitarian and theocratic political systems; the relationships between foreign and domestic policy; and the influence of economics on political debate and decision-making. As well as introducing you to key debates and approaches, the module will also encourage you to develop the critical thinking, writing and analytical skills you will need to study Politics at degree-level.
20 Credits
optional
Practical
Coursework

Code: 4HY501

Historical Methods and Sources (PDP)

The module introduces you to the study of history at undergraduate level. It outlines the challenges you will encounter in studying and writing about the past, and equips you with the requisite skills of the discipline. You will acquire an understanding of the nature and variety of history and historical inquiry. There is discussion of the methodology and aims of history.

The module allows you to analyse such topics as objectivity, specialisation, narrative, the relationship of History to other disciplines, and the public role of the historian. There is discussion of the role played by journalists, both as witnesses to historical events and as writers of history.

You will engage with debates concerning biography, contemporary history, Marxist historical analysis, the possibility of ‘total’ history and the influence of postmodernism. You will consider issues in historiography through the examination of a case study, concentrating upon an area of historical controversy.

You will gain an understanding of competing theoretical approaches, thus encouraging your conceptual development. The module examines the principal sources available to you as researchers, enabling you to appreciate the strengths and weaknesses of different types of historical evidence. The module looks at practical applications of historical knowledge and skills, highlighting the vast range of potential careers open to graduates in history and other related disciplines.

 

 

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20 Credits
core
Coursework

Code: 4HY506

Derby and the World: Public Uses of the Past

This module explores Derby and Derbyshire’s global history, as well as examining how this history is portrayed and employed beyond the academy. It concentrates upon a range of significant historical individuals, places, structures and processes that link Derby and Derbyshire with the wider world, including Viceroy Curzon, the Derwent Valley Mills, migration, and the slave trade.

You will be encouraged to think critically about major themes and trends across both global and local history, and to consider the relationship between the two. You will also reflect on the ways in which we can convey these connected histories to wider audiences. Through lectures, seminars, field trips and workshops, you will be encouraged to investigate the theory of public history, to engage with practitioners in scrutinising the production and representation of popular historical knowledge, and to share your research into Derby’s global history via a public-facing assignment.

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20 Credits
core
Practical
Coursework

Code: 4HY507

Empires, Migrants and Mobility

This module will examine the ways in which international power dynamics have evolved over the course of the modern period and the impact this has had on the experiences of diverse groups of people across the globe.

We will examine the ways in which some political structures – from the Ming dynasty in China to Great Britain in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries – have sought to colonize and influence other parts of the world, and the ways in which these endeavours have created a host of global connections. In particular, we will examine the movement of people, goods and ideas created by these global connections, focusing on issues such as large-scale migration between different parts of the world, the displacement of people as a result of imperial conflicts, the emergence of transnational communities, and the transmission of modern ideologies across different parts of the world

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20 Credits
core
Coursework

Code: 4HY508

The Enlightenment

This module explores the impact on the Enlightenment on society, culture and politics in the long eighteenth century. Drawing on examples from Britain, Europe and North America it discusses whether key themes in Enlightenment thinking did shape the lives of ordinary people, and whether it deserves the moniker of ‘The Age of Reason’.

Focusing on responses to monarchical absolutism, the idealisation of nature, the growth of scientific enquiry and the impact of scepticism, the module will consider the extent of socio-economic and political change in this period. You will engage with a range of primary materials in order to explore the ways in which ideas were shared and understood. You will also engage with historiographical debates about the implementation of these ideas and the degree to which there was a shared enlightenment.

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20 Credits
core
Coursework

Code: 4HY509

Nations and Nationalism, 1789-1914

This module will cover a period of great change in Europe, charting the rise of the idea of the ‘nation state’. Beginning with the French Revolution of 1789 and the changes brought about by Napoleon Bonaparte, the module will trace the development of nationalism and liberalism across the continent. The revolutions of 1848 will provide an example of the immense historical dynamics that converged in the nineteenth century, with a diverse set of outcomes.

We will examine how political reform in Britain brought about a different idea of ‘the nation’, based on continuity and gradual change, and the avoidance of revolution. Surveying the second half of the ‘long nineteenth century’, you will then explore how nationalism fed into the creation of nation-states in Germany and Italy, how nationalist ideas collided with alternative political ideologies, nationalism and imperialism, and how national rivalries turned into World War.

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20 Credits
core
Practical
Coursework

Code: 4HY510

Renaissance and Reformation, 1485-1648

This module will provide you with a broad overview of some of the most important political, intellectual, social and cultural developments of the early modern period. You will explore the changes that Europe, including the British Isles, underwent during the Renaissance, focusing on the emergence of new forms of thinking, including humanism, and on the development of new approaches in art and culture during this period.

You will examine to what extent these developments, coupled with the nature of early modern politics, led to significant religious change, subsumed under the term ‘Reformation’. You will compare and contrast the motivations of different religious reformers and the processes that led to the Reformation in different parts of Europe. Following this, you will explore the short-term and longer-term impact of the Reformation on both everyday life in Europe and on European politics, focusing on changes in family life and social structures, as well as reactions against the Reformation. Finally, you will examine a number of early modern conflicts, including the Civil Wars in the British Isles and the Thirty Years’ War, in order to discuss the impact of religious change on the international order during the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries.

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20 Credits
core
Coursework

Code: 5HY505

Public Conference: Marketing and Presenting the Past

This module enables you to undertake a piece of collaborative research, culminating in the writing and delivery of a conference paper. You will contribute to the publicity for the conference through a variety of formats, which may include posters, leaflets, and websites.

The module will develop your academic skills as well as highlighting essential transferable skills, such as teamwork, thus enhancing employability. Through preparation for the conference, you will be encouraged to establish links with both local and national archives and with organisations in the heritage industry.

 

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20 Credits
core
Practical
Coursework

Code: 5HY510

The Cold War: Global Conflict, Culture and Diplomacy, 1945-1991

This module will allow you to examine some of the most important developments in international history since 1945. By focusing on the conflict between the USA and the Soviet Union that emerged after the end of the Second World War, and setting this conflict within its broader global context, you will be able to understand the factors that shaped diplomacy, power relations, ideology, and culture between the mid-1940s and the early 1990s.

You will engage with the historiographical debates relating to the origins of the Cold War and examine the role played by ideological differences as well as the changing structure of international relations. You will also examine the impact of the Cold War on the rest of the American and Soviet spheres of influence. This will include an examination of the ways in which it affected the former colonies in Asia and Africa, allowing you to engage with recent literature on the truly global nature of the Cold War. Finally we will examine the factors that led to the decline of the Soviet Union and the end of the Cold War in the late 1980s and early 1990s.

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20 Credits
core
Coursework

Code: 5HY511

Research in Practice

This module is designed to develop your research skills and to apply them to different contexts. It will provide an advanced understanding of research methodologies and to consider different ways in which scholars undertake research.

It will then enable you to put these skills into practice into two different contexts. The first of these is a short, group, applied research project, based upon a brief from an external partner. You will then produce an extended piece of academic writing based upon an individually devised research question. The module will encourage you to think about how research skills are transferable beyond university and prepare you for the greater emphasis on independent learning at level 6.

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20 Credits
core
Practical
Coursework

Code: 5HY512

The Early Modern Body

This module explores the ways in which the early modern body was conceptualised, treated, and represented between 1500 and 1850. Considering historical sources from across the early modern world, the module will examine themes such as gender, race, sexuality and beauty.

You will use primary sources and case studies in order to gain an understanding of topics such as early modern medicine, aesthetics, and fashion. The impact of shifting ideas about knowledge, the self, and culture, as reflected by the Renaissance and the Enlightenment, will be debated and discussed. Changes in understandings of science and medicine will be examined. You will also be introduced to key theoretical frameworks and methodologies employed in examining the history of the body, and you will explore the body’s importance for understanding vital issues in the history of the early modern world.

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20 Credits
core
Coursework

Code: 5HY513

Living with Dictatorship: Nazi Germany and the Soviet Union in Comparative Perspective

This module examines the causes and effects of the authoritarian regimes that emerged in Europe during the interwar period. You will analyse the causes for the rise of political leaders such as Hitler and Stalin, and will evaluate the impact authoritarian regimes had on the everyday experiences of citizens across much of Europe, focusing on issues of class, gender, race and ideology.

You will compare and contrast different developments, whilst also paying attention to the historiographical debates about the nature and limits of totalitarianism.

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20 Credits
core
Practical
Coursework

Code: 5HY514

Continuity and Change in Contemporary Britain

The module examines the evolution of contemporary British society and politics, through a study of key themes and debates in the history of Britain since 1945. This will involve the discussion of issues such as the evolution of the Welfare State; the basis of the post-war political consensus; Britain's economic performance; British identity, nationalism and devolution; the impact of changing social and cultural attitudes in the 1960s and 1970s; immigration and the development of a multi-cultural society; the impact of Thatcherism; the modernising agenda of New Labour; and the consequences for Britain of the global economic crisis in 2008.

The module will also consider the challenges that have faced Britain on the global stage, examining the factors that shaped the retreat from empire and how well Britain has coped with its diminished influence. This will involve discussion of Britain’s military power; the ties with its former colonies; and the significance of its relationship with the United States. There will be an assessment of the complex factors that have influenced Britain's attitude towards European integration and membership of the EU.

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20 Credits
core
Coursework

Code: 6HY501

British Country Houses and Their Families

This module will introduce you to the history of British country houses and their families, using a thematic and multidisciplinary approach. The architectural history of the buildings will be considered, as well as the development and management of their gardens and estates. The ways that people used the houses in the past will also be examined, especially their roles as family homes, places of employment, centres of economy and bases of political power.

Changing attitudes towards the country house and the aristocracy will also be considered and their representations in art and literature assessed. The module will also encourage you to think about the modern functions of country houses and their families, especially their roles in the heritage industry and in contemporary rural society.

 

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20 Credits
optional
Coursework

Code: 6HY508

Advanced Research in Practice

This module provides you with an opportunity to experience working in a cultural, creative, arts, heritage or related organisation and to develop valuable academic and transferable skills.

The main focus is to negotiate and conduct a work-based project with an employer or other outside body. This might be a museum or gallery, a cinema or theatre, a radio or TV station, or an educational establishment, for example. It allows you to bring your academic skills to an organisation, to complete a project that would be useful to them (and, in many cases, the wider community), and gives you the opportunity to gain valuable work experience relevant to your chosen career path.

 

 

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40 Credits
optional
Coursework

Code: 6HY509

Yugoslavia and After: 1980 To The Present

This module examines how Josip Broz Tito’s relatively stable state degenerated into chaos and conflict by investigating the history and politics of Yugoslavia and the Yugoslav Successor States from Tito’s death in 1980 to the present day.

You will explore the major forces and influences contained within the domestic politics and economies of Yugoslavia including the contemporary economic, social, cultural and political transition. Of special concern will be the nature of religious, cultural and ethnic differences built upon competing interpretations of identity and exclusion, the problems of nationalism, and the growth of pressure groups. You will also study and analyse the key historiographical controversies surrounding the nature of Socialist and post-Socialist societies in South East Europe.

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20 Credits
optional
Coursework

Code: 6HY510

Exploring the Slum: The Politics of Poverty in Britain

In early nineteenth-century Britain the unprecedented rapid growth of industrial cities, and concerns about disease and squalor, led to heightened anxieties about possible revolution. This module examines the ways in which ‘social investigators’ attempted to explore, explain and contain this threat. Looking at how poverty was depicted by government officials, social reformers, public health advocates, philanthropists, investigative journalists, authors and artists, the module considers how the urban ‘slum’ became the battleground for fierce debates about class, gender, and national identity.

The module draws heavily on the excellent range of digital resources available for the study of nineteenth-century society and culture, including newspapers, pamphlets, statistics, and digitised archives. You will engage with a diverse range of representations of the slum to create a collaborative public online exhibition about changing attitudes towards urban poverty throughout the period.

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20 Credits
optional
Practical
Coursework

Code: 6HY511

India, Empire, Diaspora: Identity, Violence and Memory Across the Twentieth Century

This module analyses the circulatory flow of ideas and identities between India, its diaspora and the wider world. It does so by focusing on some of the most important (and frequently violent) events of the twentieth century in both global and Indian history, including the two world wars, the Amritsar Massacre, India’s partition, and the destruction of the Babri Masjid [mosque].

You will be encouraged to think critically about the emergence and development of caste, national and religious identities across domestic, diasporic and global contexts. There will also be opportunities to reflect upon the continuing relevancy of Gandhian and Nehruvian ideas in the wider world, and to explore the manner in which key events and individuals are remembered and memorialised in India and the diaspora today.

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20 Credits
optional
Practical
Coursework

Code: 6HY512

Britain and Total War

This module will examine the British experience of the two world wars, enabling a comparative study of the impact of modern warfare on society, culture, economics and politics. It will look at debates on the extent to which the world wars were motors of change in Britain. The contribution of Britain’s colonies to the prosecution of the wars will be assessed with consideration of the implications for British imperial power.
The module will consider the extent to which the wars have played a vital part in the shaping of British identity and the extent to which their legacy has a continuing influence on contemporary views of Britain and Britishness.
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20 Credits
optional
Coursework

Code: 6HY513

Rise of the Dragon? China and the World Since 1793

Over the past decades, the People’s Republic of China has become one of the most important international players. On this module, you will study the history of China’s relations with the rest of the world since the Opium Wars of the mid-nineteenth century. Examining politics, culture, economics and societies, you will explore and challenge a range of different ideas and myths about China and Chinese history, furthering your understanding of Chinese history and culture beyond simplistic stereotypes and placing it within its global context.

You will analyse the impact of European imperialism on China and China’s role in international conflicts, but also focus on the importance of intercultural contact between China and the West, ranging from the rise of Shanghai as a modern, cosmopolitan metropolis during the 1920s to the emergence of Chinatowns and Chinese restaurants in North America and Western Europe. Finally, the module will examine China’s position in the twenty-first century, its rapid economic growth, as well as some of the domestic and international challenges it is facing.

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20 Credits
optional
Practical
Coursework

Code: 6HY997

History Independent Study (PDP)

This module enables you to undertake a substantial piece of historical research in an aspect of modern history. You will need to show engagement with historiographical debates and to undertake critical analysis of relevant sources.

The writing of the dissertation will enable you to develop your ability to construct sustained and coherent arguments, and to show an understanding of relevant theoretical and methodological issues. The skills developed in this module are essential to your future employability and personal development, as well as providing a basis for postgraduate study.

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40 Credits
optional
Coursework

Please note that our modules are subject to change - we review the content of our courses regularly, making changes where necessary to improve your experience and graduate prospects.

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Campus Tours

Campus Tours are a great way to explore our campuses, facilities and halls of residence. We’ll be running the tours in two-hour timeslots, giving you the best possible experience while adhering to social distancing guidelines.

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Virtual Open Day

Delve deeper into the course with our Virtual Open Day, packed with subject and course information to help you make your choice, including tours of facilities, 360° views of award-winning accommodation plus advice and insight from students and academics.

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How you will learn

During your foundation year you will be assessed mainly by coursework, and with some in-class tests.

For the rest of your degree you are assessed on 100% coursework: there are no exams. Assessment incorporates different formats including essays, document analysis, the examination of material culture and the built environment, book reviews, projects, website design, posters and exhibitions, oral presentations and debating skills.

Who will you meet

You will be taught by our team of engaging, passionate and inspiring subject experts. They include:

Personal academic tutoring

Your personal academic tutor will work with you to help you get the most out of your time at university. Having someone to talk to about your academic progress, your university experience and your professional aspirations is hugely valuable. We want you to feel challenged in your studies, stretched but confident to achieve your academic and professional goals.

Find out more about personal academic tutoring

Who will teach you

Ruth Larsen

Dr Ruth Larsen
Programme leader

As a Senior Lecturer in History, Ruth Larsen is the Programme Leader for undergraduate History programmes. She has research expertise in British History of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, especially relating to gender history and the history of the country house.

View full staff profileView full staff profile

Entry requirements

September 2021 typical entry requirements

RequirementWhat we're looking for
UCAS points72
Specific requirements at A-level

No specific subject requirements

Specific requirements at GCSE

GCSE Maths and English are preferred, however if you don't have these qualifications you will be able to undertake Maths and English at Level 2 as part of your course of study.

IELTS6.0 (with 5.5 in each skills area)
Interview / AuditionN/A
PortfolioN/A

Alternative entry qualifications:

We usually consider an A-level in General Studies as a supplementary qualification. A good application/performance will be taken into account if you do not meet the criteria/offer conditions.

Our entry requirements for this course should be read together with the University's general entry requirements, which details subjects we accept, alternative qualifications and what we're looking for at Derby.

Fees and funding

2020/21 Fees

 Full-timePart-time
UK/EU

£9,250 per year

N/A

International

£14,045 per year

N/A

Further information about our fees and support you may be entitled to.

Additional costs and optional extras

How to apply

UK/EU students

Full-time students applying to start in September should apply for this course through UCAS or you can apply directly to the University for an undergraduate course if you’re not applying to any other UK university in the same year.

Apply through UCASApply directly to the University

Guidance for EU students post-Brexit

International students

Full-time students applying to start in September should apply for this course through UCAS or you can apply directly to the University for an undergraduate course if you’re not applying to any other UK university in the same year.

Apply through UCASApply directly to the University

Guidance for international applicants applying for an undergraduate degree

Careers

Skills for success

At Derby you will gain attributes beyond those traditionally associated with History graduates. You will not only build your academic capabilities but also apply your historical knowledge to the workplace. We encourage you to develop skills in areas such as presentation and teamworking, which will help you stand out in the job market.

You can approach your future career with confidence: latest Unistats figures show that 95% of our students were in work or further study six months after completing their course.

Wide-ranging career opportunities

With a History degree you can follow a wide range of careers in the education profession, libraries, museums, archives, law, the civil service, management, marketing and the uniformed services. Recent graduates have, for instance, taken up professional roles in local authorities; in marketing for major national businesses; and in project consultancy advising global companies.

A growing number of our graduates also use their degree as a platform for rewarding postgraduate study in subjects such as History, Museum Studies, Archive Management and International Relations.

Ensuring you’re ‘work-ready’

Our Careers and Employment Service will provide you with support from day one of your course to ensure you leave Derby as a ‘work-ready’ graduate - industry aware, motivated and enterprising. Throughout your studies, you will also benefit from our Personal Development Planning (PDP) scheme which enables you to reflect on your learning and develop your career ambitions. The support continues once you have completed your course too: you are entitled to further help and guidance from the Careers and Employment Service for up to three years after leaving the University.

Contact us

If you need any more information from us, eg on courses, accommodation, applying, car parking, fees or funding, please contact us and we will do everything we can to help you.

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Additional information about your studies

Teaching hours

Like most universities, we operate extended teaching hours at the University of Derby, so contact time with your lecturers and tutors could be anytime between 9am and 9pm. Your timetable will usually be available on the website 24 hours after enrolment on to your course.

Additional costs and optional extras

We’re committed to providing you with an outstanding learning experience. Our expert teaching, excellent facilities and great employability prepare you for your future career. As part of our commitment to you we aim to keep any additional study costs to a minimum. However, there are occasions where students may incur some additional costs.

The information below is correct for entry in the academic year September 2020 - August 2021 only. Entry for future academic years may be subject to change.

Included in your fees

Mandatory costs not included in your fees

Optional costs not included in your fees

Please note: Our courses are refreshed and updated on a regular basis. If you are thinking about transferring onto this course (into the second year for example), you should contact the programme leader for the relevant course information as modules may vary from those shown on this page.

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