Two minutes to midnight

Two minutes to midnight takes a closer look at the teacher mental health crisis, the darker side of tech and what’s happening to the world’s politics.

Editor's letter

Being editor of this magazine is one of the highlights of my role. It’s a publication that brings together the best of the University; showcasing academic expertise, research and knowledge, and celebrating our students, graduates and staff.

When Issue 1 launched back in 2014, we didn’t know how it would be received, but we knew we needed to shout more loudly about the University of Derby, and that this magazine could help us to do that. The University has come a long way since then, and as its reputation, profile and impact has grown, so has this magazine.

You may have been a loyal reader since day one, or this may be the first copy you’ve picked up and read. Whatever stage of the journey you’ve joined us on, thank you for reading and please continue to let us have your feedback and thoughts on how we can continue to develop the magazine going forward.

This issue is packed full of interesting and inspiring features on topics including the teacher mental health crisis, the darker side of tech and, as the front cover suggests, we’ve attempted to find out what’s happening to the world’s politics (something I’m sure you’ve all wondered at some stage over the past few years!).

We feature some fantastic guest contributors. Lizzie Ball, internationally acclaimed violinist, vocalist, educator and concert producer, is in the spotlight for ‘5 minutes with’, David Williams, of the Metro Growth Board and Geldards, contributes his ‘Opinion’, and Dr Kennette Benedict, Senior Advisor at the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists (which maintains the Doomsday Clock), offers an interesting political perspective.

Enjoy the read, enjoy your summer and please share your feedback with me at r.marshalsay@derby.ac.uk – we’d be very pleased to receive it.

Download this issue of the University of Derby Magazine

We examine the teacher mental health crisis, the darker side of tech and attempt to find out what’s happening to the world’s politics

Rosie Marshalsay
Head of Corporate Communications