Dr Lee Barnby

Position: Lecturer

College: College of Engineering and Technology

Department: Computing and Mathematics

Subject area: Mathematics

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About

I am a lecturer in Mathematics, teaching on several undergraduate modules, including supervising final year student projects. My research background is in experimental high energy nuclear physics, which involves smashing together nuclei at very high energies to recreate, on a much smaller scale, the conditions in the first few microseconds after the big bang. This research involves collecting and analysing several terabytes of data, so I am interested in advanced techniques for handling these data. I have an interest in the connection between the distributions of the particles produced in the collisions and the mathematics describing non-equilibrium processes.  I also supervise PhD students working in this area and work to infuse this research into my teaching.

Teaching responsibilities

 

  • Module Leader, Mathematical Modelling
  • Supervisor, Research Methods and Independent Study in Mathematics

 

Research interests

High-energy nuclear collisions at the CERN Large Hadron Collider.

By studying these collisions, we can learn about 'QCD' (Quantum Chromodynamics) the force that binds together the familiar matter we see around us. As a result of the collision, an extremely hot droplet of fluid is formed with remarkable properties. Many thousands of particles are created in each collision when this fluid 'freezes out'.  This research involves collecting and analysing several petabytes of data, so I am interested in advanced techniques for handling these data. I have an interest in the connection between the distributions of the particles produced in the collisions and the mathematics describing non-equilibrium processes.

Membership of professional bodies

Member, Institute of Physics (MInstP)

Qualifications

Postgraduate

Ph.D in Nuclear Physics, Birmingham (1999)

Undergraduate

B.Sc. in Physics, Manchester (1995)

Recent publications

The full list of the ~300 publications that I have as a member of the ALICE, STAR and NA49 Collaborations are available on the INSPIRE website. Recent highlights include:

  • Centrality dependence of the charged-particle multiplicity density at mid- rapidity in Pb-Pb collisions at √sNN = 5.02 TeV
    J. Adam et al. [ALICE Collaboration].
    Phys. Rev. Lett. 116 222302 (2016)
  • Centrality evolution of the charged-particle pseudorapidity density over a broad pseudorapidity range in Pb-Pb collisions at √sNN = 2.76 TeV
    J. Adam et al. [ALICE Collaboration].
    Phys. Lett. B 754, 373 (2016)

All the above are open access.

 

Recent conferences

 

  • Institute of Nuclear Physics Nuclear Physics Conference, 2016
  • Prospects in the Physics of Discrete Symmetries, 2014
  • Strangeness in Quark Matter, 2013
  • International Workshop on Early Physics with heavy-Ion Collisions at LHC, 2011

 

International experience

Throughout my research career, I have had international collaborators and experience working abroad. In 2015 spent one year based at the CERN (European Particle Physics Laboratory) as a Scientific Associate (a kind of visiting scientist) as part of my work with the ALICE Collaboration which I joined in 2008. I had previously carried out research, since 1999, with the STAR Collaboration based at Brookhaven National Laboratory in the USA, spending the first four years of my postdoctoral career living there on Long Island, NY. My thesis work was done at CERN with the NA49 experiment and my first visit there in 1995 was my first ever flight!

 

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