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Course details

Study options

Full-time: 3 years

UK/EU fee

£9,250 per year* (2020/21)

International fee

£14,045 per year (2020/21)

UCAS points

112* (September 2020 entry)

UCAS code

Y002

Course level

Undergraduate

Qualification

Joint Honours

Start date

September

Location

One Friar Gate Square, Derby Campus

What is Joint Honours?

A Joint Honours degree gives you the opportunity to study two subjects as one degree. This type of degree will broaden your skill set and enhance your career prospects.

You can combine any two subjects as long as they’re in different zones, find out what you can combine this subject with.

Course description

If you would like a career in international affairs, diplomatic practice and global politics, this course is for you. Offering unique opportunities for work-based learning overseas, International Relations and Diplomacy is a stimulating, topical and challenging subject.

Why you should study International Relations and Diplomacy at the University of Derby

Offering fascinating perspectives on current affairs and international events as they affect people around the world, this course will help you to become a better-informed global citizen.

You will study key international relations themes such as advocacy, democracy, human rights, social policy and international security in the context of global conflict, peace and international law. At the same time, you will develop valuable vocational and transferable skills which will equip you to work with international organisations in a wide variety of settings.

A strong emphasis on diplomacy

This course reflects the growing need to resolve intra-national and international conflicts through diplomacy rather than the use of military force.

It will give you a strong knowledge and understanding of the varied diplomatic exchanges that take place between governments and inter-government institutions. You will be well prepared to work in the general field of international politics and will gain the key skills needed for a successful career within diplomatic communities.

There is the opportunity to visit the Foreign Office and embassies to see how they work with diplomats, ambassadors and other government representatives around the world. You will also draw inspiration from our vibrant programme of guest speakers and specialist seminars.

International study visits and internships

As a core element of the course, you will undertake a week-long fieldtrip to Geneva, visiting the United Nations Office and the United Nations Institute for Training and Research (UNITAR). You will benefit from lectures and tutorials led by government representatives, UN officials and professionals who work in the field of international relations and diplomacy. There are opportunities for internships too.

These experiences are designed to link the practice of international relations with your theoretical knowledge of the subject They will foster your understanding of the environment in which political decisions are made, especially in the context of an international or supra-state inter-governmental institution.

Expertise and enthusiasm

Our experienced and enthusiastic team are passionate about International Relations and Diplomacy and keen to share their knowledge with you. They will encourage you to do your best throughout your studies as part of a student-centred and varied learning experience.

We employ several approaches to teaching and learning, including formal lectures, student-led seminars, workshops and tutorials. We encourage active student participation and foster a relaxed, inclusive environment where students learn both with one another and from each other.

Fascinating research

You will be inspired and motivated by our research-active team whose specialist areas span issues such as diplomatic practice, international security, arbitration, international dispute resolution, post-9/11 America and the ‘War on Terror’, international institutions, human rights and public international law.

Broaden your perspective

We will foster your awareness of key issues such as power, justice, order, conflict, legitimacy, accountability, obligation, sovereignty, mediation, security, governance and other themes relating to inter-governmental relations and decision-making processes within the international system.

You will also learn about concepts such as anarchy, statism, security-dilemma, self-help, nationalism, institutionalism, regimes, realism, neo-realism, liberalism, globalisation, peace-building, conflict resolution and arbitration. Each of these concepts can help you understand, analyse and interpret political developments.

Popular Joint Honours combinations

Joint Honours gives you the flexibility to cover two subjects in one degree. Popular combinations with International Relations and Diplomacy include:

What you will study

Example modules are shown below, the modules available as a Joint Honours student will be dependent on the subject that you combine with. In your first year, modules will be defined for you, and will be dependent on your subject combination to ensure you have the best fit. In your second and third years, module availability and the number of modules you are required to take will depend on whether you choose this subject as a major, joint or minor.

Year 1Year 1Year 2Year 2Year 3Year 3

Code: 4AM502

Freedom's Conflicts: An Introduction to American History (PDP)

This module will provide you with an introduction to key topics in American history, through an exploration of a range of significant debates about, and, sometimes, conflicts over alternative meanings of the key concept of ‘freedom’. The emphasis will be less on providing an overall narrative than on focussing on major themes and transformations, with attention to questions of power, race, gender, and ethnicity.

More generally, you will examine how different Americans at particular stages in their history have sought to define themselves, and how ‘essentialist’ explanations of American identity might be opened up to questioning and discussion.

At the same time, the module will look at methodological issues including the analysis of primary and secondary sources, historiography, and information gathering and presentation Through this focus on skills the module will encourage you to reflect on your own personal development, and to begin the process of linking your academic studies to your career aspirations after university.

More information
20 Credits
optional
Coursework

Code: 4IR500

Introduction to International Relations and Diplomacy

This module seeks to introduce the subject of International Relations and Diplomacy within the context of global politics. Aimed at students all students, including those who have had no direct training in the academic field of International Relations, the module examines concepts, structures, actors and policy processes on the global stage.

It provides a strong foundation in the study of international politics as the basis for further study in stages 2 and 3. First, the module examines the origins of International Relations and the political context in which diplomatic relations operates. It establishes a link between people, power and politics, and shows how international relations, security and economic development are linked. Second, it seeks to introduce students to a wide range of ideas and theories relating to international world including globalisation, gender and humanitarianism in the digital age. Can International Relations as a discipline can satisfactorily explain and meet the global challenges we face today? How best might diplomats respond? Theoretical approaches include realism, liberalism, and critical approaches. Examples are drawn from issues of national security and global terrorism; global trade and finance, human rights, intervention, and poverty and hunger alleviation.

The module is assessed by 100% coursework.

More information
20 Credits
optional
Coursework

Code: 4IR501

Diplomatic Induction

The purpose of this module is to introduce students to the subject of diplomacy and to develop essential skills in diplomacy and negotiation. Through the module, students will develop a range of intellectual, personal and interpersonal skills crucial for diplomatic training.

These include skills such as political networking, diplomatic writing, oral presentation amongst others. The module also introduces the art of political speech writing and diplomatic communications between countries and within government institutions. The module incorporates the concept of Personal Development Planning (PDP) and the importance of regularly assessing and reflecting on one’s own skills and skill needs in a practical way. The module is delivered via weekly lectures and tutorials. The module is assessed by 100% coursework.

More information
20 Credits
optional
Coursework

Code: 4IR502

Contemporary Issues in International Politics

This module examines the contemporary issues facing the international community in the 21st century. Using relevant theories and empirical examples, it introduces students to the question of as to why the political world is prone to crisis. The foundation of political relations between nation states is examined in relation to the idea of promotion and protection of democracy.

The module covers key debates such as political sovereignty, principle of non-intervention, just and unjust war, transnational democracy etc. Using case studies, the module explores the contemporary world of politics and its crises. The growing tension between politics, economics, people and resources as witnessed in North Africa and the Middle East in what is now known as the ‘Arab Spring’ is examined with reference to the general disenfranchisement of the general populace from political systems.

More information
20 Credits
optional
Coursework

Code: 4LA505

Principles of Law

The study of Law needs to be placed into its theoretical, societal, historical and administrative context. This module provides that. An undergraduate student of Law also needs to acquire appropriate skills. As well as skills which relate to the study and method of Law, students require reinforcement and development of their communication, research, information technology and basic legal research skills together with development of general critical abilities.

This module seeks to provide a structured route, allowing students to achieve these objectives and demonstrate their skills development in a tangible way. It acts as a foundation for further study and assists employability by giving the student transferable skills to use while undertaking the award and also in further vocational stages and research stages of education. An international context is delivered by consideration of comparative legal systems and the European influence on the UK jurisdiction.

More information
20 Credits
optional
Practical
Coursework

Code: 4LA515

Perspectives on Crime

This introductory module considers the detection, investigation and prosecution of crime, from both perspectives of the state and the defendant. As such, students are provided with an overview of the roles of the criminal justice agencies responding to crime and the procedures involved in bringing criminals to justice.

Students will be able to explore the criminal process from the moment a crime is reported, the way in which evidence is gathered and the purposes it serves, through to the final presentation at trial. Particular crimes such as murder and rape will be examined from both the state’s and defendants’ perspectives.

More information
20 Credits
optional
Exam
Coursework

Code: 5HY502

European Cultural Identities and Ethnic Minorities

Since the end of the Cold War, the impact of migration, displacement and minority cultures and peoples within the space of larger multicultural states, has become an issue of crucial importance to our understanding of European history and the contemporary European political scene. As such, the impact and ramifications of different and competing cultural identities and ethnic minorities constitute one of the greatest challenges for Europe at the beginning of twenty-first century.

In this module, you will examine some of the currents of identity formation and their impact upon politics, and you will examine the formation of cultural identity on both macro and micro levels, within selected communities of Europe today.

 

 

More information
20 Credits
optional
Coursework

Code: 5IR500

International Institutions and Diplomacy

This module attempts a comparative analysis of governmental and inter-governmental political institutions. It examines the notion of “nation-state” and evaluates the link between political ideas, actors and institutions designed to foster relations between nation states. Using a combination of both lectures/tutorials and field visits to key national/international institutions, the module seeks to explore key concepts such as power, agency, structure, democracy, international society and other concepts relating to the study of International Relations.

A residential field course involving visits to key international political institutions such as the United Nations (Geneva) or the European Parliament (Brussels) constitutes a core element of the module. The field visit is designed to illustrate the practice of international relations and to foster students’ understanding of the environment in which political decisions are made, especially in the context of an international or supra-state inter-governmental institution. The module is assessed by 100% coursework.

More information
40 Credits
optional
Coursework

Code: 5IR501

Research Methods in International Relations Diplomacy

This module aims at providing students with theoretical and empirical knowledge of international relations and diplomacy. It introduces students to a range of analytical and statistical techniques employed in research practice in international studies and diplomacy.

The module is designed to develop students’ skills and aptitude in the use of computers in data analysis, using computer software such as Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS), Microsoft Excel and other statistical and analytical programmes. It provides students with essential skills in conducting empirical and analytical research in international relations and diplomacy. Using a number of critical analytical/statistical methods, the module covers techniques of handling political data from various sources – primary and secondary. 

Students will find these the techniques valuable in their final year dissertation or project work. It uses both quantitative and qualitative approaches to the analysis of political data and develops students’ ability to source, analyse, synthesise and evaluate information to create reports with structured and logical arguments.

The module is assessed by 100% coursework.

More information
20 Credits
optional
Coursework

Code: 5IR502

Diplomatic Practice

This module examines the theory and practice of diplomacy. It covers essential features of international diplomacy and introduces students to the practical issues involved in diplomatic relations and management of political crisis. The module examines the arguments for diplomacy as a tool for conflict resolution. Through its practical oriented approach, it aims to prepare students for careers in foreign ministries, international organisations/institutions, and global civil society organisations.

The module includes the history/evolution of diplomacy and how diplomatic practices are conducted within the international system. The role of diplomacy as a tool in inter-governmental relations and in the management and resolution of global conflicts are examined with reference to case studies.

The module helps to develop a good level of students’ understanding of diplomatic protocol, and inter-governmental communications. It offers practical training on how diplomats operate within the multilateral setting and perform effectively and efficiently in inter-governmental negotiations, cooperation’s and conflict resolutions.

The module is assessed by 100% coursework.

More information
20 Credits
optional
Coursework

Code: 5LA517

International Human Rights Law

International Human Rights Law is arguably one of the most dynamic, far reaching and successful areas of international law. Growing international concern about human rights abuses can be seen to stem from the anti-slavery movement in the early 19th century through increased protection for the victims of war to modern day concerns arising from the aftermath of both world wars. This being said, certain areas of human rights protection remain controversial especially when behaviours are culturally entrenched.

This module addresses the development of human rights protection through the consideration of a variety of international instruments and assessing their impact and efficacy in eradicating abuses. Through a series of case studies students will address areas of modern concern and assess the enforcement of human rights norms at both regional and international level.

More information
20 Credits
optional
Coursework

Code: 5LA518

Public International Law

Classically, in the writings of such as Vattel in the 18th century, the state is the main subject of international law. The contemporary state is threatened in various directions: ethnic conflict, international financial speculation, the drugs trade, terrorism, to name a few. The question arises, therefore, is the classical conception on international law still valid given modern global realities.

To this end, the module explores and challenges the basic concepts of public international law – the state, treaty as a source of public international law, the role of custom, territorial and jurisdictional sovereignty, diplomatic law, non-intervention and a state's right to self-defence, against the practical concepts under which these have to now be applied.

More information
20 Credits
optional
Coursework

Code: 5SL523

Globalisation and Social Change

The concept of ‘globalisation’ is one of the most prominent - and controversial - ideas current in contemporary social science. We will begin with an overview of the contribution of major social theorists to debates about the nature and impact of globalisation and in particular social networks of communication and cultures of consumption. We will focus on the development of a global capitalist economy and the impact of globalisation on everyday working lives. We will investigate forms of, and challenges to global culture and expose the hierarchies of identity that permeate global power relations. Throughout the module, we will critically evaluate the extent to which global phenomena are experienced evenly around the globe and question if national dimensions of power are waning.

Through contemporary case studies we will look at the construction of ‘global threats’ such as terrorism, the reality of global pandemics - and the grave danger posed by a lack of effective global institutions. More recently the nature of the threat presented by global warming has provided sociologists with stark insights into the nature of social change. Is the ‘environmental threat’ better understood as a social - rather than straightforwardly biological - problem that is a matter of definition and social and political construction - demanding a ‘global’ response and the development of a ‘global’ consciousness? Finally we will investigate the nature of social change and reconfigurations of individualisation and community in a digital age.

More information
20 Credits
optional
Coursework

Code: 6HY505

Keeping The Peace? Conflict, Power, and Diplomacy Since 1945

This module will deal with some of the most momentous events in International Relations from the Cold War to the twenty-first century. It will begin with an examination of the Cold War, its origins and course.

You will then analyse to what extent the security environment of the 1990s and 2000s was drastically different from that of the Cold War, studying how the East-West conflict has given way both to smaller regional conflicts, for instance in the Middle East, and to a North-South conflict between supposedly developed and developing states. Attention will also be paid to global security challenges, such as terrorism, and contemporary debates about the nature of war and peace.

You will think critically about the mechanics of international relations, assessing the relative importance of nation-states, international organizations and non-state actors. The module will be assessed by a group presentation and an essay.

More information
20 Credits
optional
Practical
Coursework

Code: 6IR500

International Security

This modules aims at developing students’ critical understanding and knowledge of international security. The challenges facing the world in relation to issues such as ethnic conflict, genocide, global terrorism, jihadists, religious extremism, national/regional uprising and violent protests, among other security issues, are examined from different perspectives.

The module employs both empirical and theoretical approaches to the question of how best to maintain world peace and security, especially post 9/11. The threat posed by armed and extremist groups such as the Islamic State in Syria (ISIS) are discussed in the module within the context of global terrorism and the western governments’ approaches to the war on terror.

The module also covers issues such as environmental, social and economic insecurity in some parts of the world in relation to access to resources. The tension created by the growing gap between those with huge access to resources and those with little or no access resulting in political discontent, ethnic conflict, uprising, international migration etc is covered with reference to the Arab Spring. The module also examines the role of civil society, community/religious leaders, national governments and non-governmental organisations in promoting global peace and security.

More information
20 Credits
optional
Coursework

Code: 6IR501

International Economic Relations

The module will examine the economic and jurisprudential justification for engaging in multilateral trading and how this current framework of international economic relation aligns with realising the economic, social political and cultural sovereignty of the members of the international community.

The module will further explore the economic tenets of contemporary international economic relationships in order to critically evaluate their impact on rights to development. In these contexts, the module will be examining the status of International economic relations, in particular the tension between global institutions and United Nations and other actors.

More information
20 Credits
optional
Coursework

Code: 6IR502

Arbitration and International Dispute Resolution

The module will critically examine the tools available in international law for the resolution of disputes between states, citizens and organisations. The module will evaluate the dispute resolution system under public international law and private international law. This module will also critically evaluate the issues of access in those dispute resolution systems.
20 Credits
optional
Coursework

Code: 6IR503

Global Watch: International Events and the Media

Almost everyone watches TV, regularly reads a daily newspaper, news website or app and often discusses what goes on in the world. The media play an important and sometimes controversial role in international affairs and global development. What we watch, hear or read from the media often shapes our views on and perspectives on international events. This module examines the role of the media in international politics and development.

The module evaluates factors of control and power by the media in galvanising and shaping public opinions on issues of national and international significance. It uses case studies from both print and electronic media to illustrate how mass communication facilities are used for political activism, forge public consensus and debate and influence development policy. The module seeks to evaluate the media coverage of international events and global development issues and highlights particular problems with the way the ‘Third World’ is portrayed by the Western media. The module involves a discussion of theories surrounding media debates and the extent to which media representations may have a positive or negative impact on global development process. The module is assessed by 100% coursework.

More information
20 Credits
optional
Coursework

Code: 6IR504

Internship/Vocational Module

This module provides opportunity for students to undertake internship and work-based experience with any international institutions, government and non-governmental organisations, embassies and other organisations of their choosing whose work relates specifically to International Relations and Diplomacy. With the approval of the module leader and the subject leader, students are able to undertake a work-based placement for a minimum three-week duration, to develop their experience and practical knowledge in the field of International Relations and Diplomacy.

Through this placement, students will be exposed, under close supervision, to the practice of International Relations and Diplomacy through real-work scenarios. Students will be able to engage with any work or project relating to professional practice in the field of international relations, diplomacy, national and international security, conflict resolution and other areas of national and international politics.

At the end of the placement, students will be required to submit a logbook detailing their internship activities and a report incorporating deep reflection on your personal experiences during the placement. The report may relate to wider issues such as the objectives, structure and procedures of the institution concerned, and the student’s role as an intern within the organisation or institution.

This report must be of a depth commensurate with Level 6 study. The placement work must relate to International Relations and Diplomacy and must not overlap with Independent Study in International Relations and Diplomacy module in respect either of location or topic. The module is assessed by 100% coursework, and it is a through-year module.

More information
20 Credits
optional
Practical

Code: 6IR999

Independent Study in International Relations and Diplomacy

This module enables students to initiate and undertake a piece of independent research in international relations and diplomacy.

Within the context of an independent (but tutor supported) research study, the student will carry out the five-step process of

  • identifying a research topic and setting the research questions
  • undertake research design by setting goals and targets for carrying out the research, with the support from an academic supervisor
  • source and collect essential data/information required
  • analyse, synthesise and evaluate the data/information collected, and
  • write an academic report of about 10,000 words on the findings.

As a PDP module, this exercise aims at develop students’ ability to think critically and independently by undertaking a self-directed research involving setting of goals, setting of interim targets, plan-implementation and review of progress. 

The research study represents an opportunity for the student to exercise initiative, creative thinking, time management and organisational skills in the pursuit of an independent piece of work of his/her choosing. All research proposals and topics are subject to approval on academic, safety and ethical grounds. Central to the research study will be a degree of problem solving, the formulation and testing of hypotheses and the critical evaluation of relevant theory. The module is assessed by 100% coursework.

More information
40 Credits
optional
Practical
Coursework

Code: 6LA517

International Human Rights Law

International Human Rights Law is arguably one of the most dynamic, far reaching and successful areas of international law. Growing international concern about human rights abuses can be seen to stem from the anti-slavery movement in the early 19th century through increased protection for the victims of war to modern day concerns arising from the aftermath of both world wars. This being said, certain areas of human rights protection remain controversial especially when behaviours are culturally entrenched.

This module addresses the development of human rights protection through the consideration of a variety of international instruments and assessing their impact and efficacy in eradicating abuses. Through a series of case studies students will address areas of modern concern and assess the enforcement of human rights norms at both regional and international level.

More information
20 Credits
optional
Coursework

Code: 6LA523

Sustainable Development and International Business Law

This module draws together two pertinent strands operative in international relations between states. These are the process of sustainable development and the regulation of international business transactions.

The module will explore and analyse the theory and practice of sustainable development as well as analyse international business transaction as it relates to the sale of goods and the provision of services. In this capacity, the module will link these two strands and will engage students with live and contemporary development problems facing governments and then allow the students to implement functional and realistic business solutions to these problems.

The module places the student at the heart of sustainable international business and fosters problem-solving, creativity, enterprise, critical analysis and innovation for the purpose of direct impact. To bolster this, the module will engage and interact with the Government Department for International Development and, the British Council through guest speakers and projects offered by these institutions. The assessment is by coursework and will require students to analyse a series of case studies and implement a sustainable business transaction.

More information
20 Credits
optional
Practical
Coursework

Code: 6SL523

Gender and Inequality in the Global Age

How does globalisation affect the lives and status of women in the world? How do the processes of economic restructuring, political instability, environmental degradation and cultural change impact upon women - particularly in the ‘developing’ world? Does globalisation distinguish between men and women as it appears to do between rich and poor? How divergent are life expectancies and experiences of violence for men, women, boys and girls? How do constructions of boyhood and girlhood impact on access to education or protection from militarism or sexual abuse? Six case studies will form a central pillar of the module: and reflect changing pressures throughout life stages across the globe focusing on: female infanticide and discrimination in China; education and girlhood in Pakistan; exploitation and forced labour in Europe, masculinity and sexual violence in Latin America, access to water in Africa and women’s health globally.

We will ask if understandings of patriarchy and feminism are shared across borders and illustrate interconnections of age, culture and tradition. We will assess what commonalities might exist in how gendered inequalities are experienced and resisted? How dominant are Western and postcolonial signifiers of innocence and vulnerability, strength and paternalism in everyday and institutional responses to inequality? In conclusion, what is the outlook for greater empowerment and progress?

More information
20 Credits
optional
Coursework

Please note that our modules are subject to change - we review the content of our courses regularly, making changes where necessary to improve your experience and graduate prospects.

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How you will learn

Teaching and learning

Equipped with analytical and critical skills, you will gain an in-depth knowledge of key political ideas; the machinery of government; diplomatic practices; and right, left, radical and moderate political ideologies and theories as they shape the complex relations between states within the international system.

You will learn and practise technical skills, honing your abilities in research, writing reports, debating and facilitating discussions around issues of national and international political significance. This will be achieved through lectures, seminars, individual and group presentations, workshops, screenings and guest lectures.

Study visits to embassies, the British Foreign Office, the United Nations and the United Nations Institute for Training and Research (UNITAR) in Geneva, will be an important part of your learning experience.

Assessment

Assessment in all the modules, except one, is based 100% on coursework, incorporating different tasks and modes such as essays of varied length, scale and scope; document analyses; book, film and music reviews; project and dissertation work; individual and group oral presentations; poster exhibitions; portfolio compilation; and seminar presentation and participation.

Supporting you all the way

We pride ourselves on being approachable and supportive. You will have a personal tutor to help and advise you throughout your degree, providing an exceptional level of support. Workshops on issues such as writing and study skills, preparatory sessions for project-based study, and employability events will also assist your progress.

Who you will meet

A highly qualified and experienced team of lecturers teach International Relations and Diplomacy at Derby. They are committed to the subject as an interdisciplinary exploration of International Relations in its broadest sense within the Political Science subject arena, but all have individual areas of expertise, publications and research interests.

Dr Francesco Belcastro, the Subject Leader for International Relations with wide-ranging research interests in the fields of international relations and Middle East studies. He is particularly interested in the application of traditional international relations theories and concepts at regional level and his current studies focus on regional involvement in civil wars both at theoretical level and with reference to Syria. Dr Belcastro is also a Fellow of the Centre for Syrian Studies at the University of St Andrews.

Dr Franc Jegede, Senior Lectuer in International Relations and Diplomacy. His research interests include International Security, Terrorism, International Development and International Institutions. Francis has a well-established links with a number of international organisations and has published chapters in books and journal articles relating to his areas of research. He has also undertaken consultancy services for a number of international organisations including the United States Agency for International Development (USAID) and European Union (EU). He is co-author of ‘Population, Resources and Development’ book published by Collins Educational (2000).

Anna Doswell - Anna is an Associate Lecturer in International Relations & Diplomacy. She currently teaches International Security and Global Watch: International Event and the media modules both at level six. She also has responsibility for the supervision of a number of students for their dissertation and personal tutorship.

Dr Sung-Hee Lee - Sung-Hee is a lecturer in Sociology with interest in the characteristics of care provision systems implemented in different policy regimes across East Asia and some European countries. Her research covers underlying policy shifts towards the socialising of care responsibilities for older and disabled groups, who need long term care. She is the author of a number of publications including:  “A Study on the Curricula of Social Welfare in the UK Universities and their Content Analysis” (2013), “The current coordinates of the Korean care regime”, “Comparison of Divergent Response in Welfare State Restructuring focused on Childcare Policy” and ”The Curricula of Social Welfare in UK Universities and the Implications for Korean Social Welfare Education”.

Joel Klaff - Joel teaches across  LL.B, LLM and supervises PhD research students. His teaching and research interest includes, Contractual Obligations, Commercial Law, International Trade, International Business and Commercial Theory. Joel is keenly interested in sustainability, which includes the sustainability of international political relations and international environmental laws. Joel examines the issue of sustainability using established legal and political philosophy such as Amartya Sen’s capability theory and John Rawls’s theory of justice as Fairness.

Rachael Ita - Rachael joined the University of Derby in 2011. Prior to that, Rachael practised as a Barrister and Solicitor in Nigeria. Rachael’s current research is in Human Rights Law. Her particular focus is on the Margin of Appreciation Doctrine and the living character of the European Convention on Human Rights. Rachel teaches modules on Public International Law, International Human Rights Law and Administrative Law.

Alasdair Kean - Alasdair is a Principal Lecturer in American Studies. His areas of research include 19th Century Social History, US popular culture abroad and American music. Alasdair is co-author of American Cultural Studies (1997).

Chris Poole - Before joining Derby, Chris was Coventry University’s Head of Department of Legal Studies.  He has lectured in Germany, the Czech Republic, Israel and Malaysia. His teaching areas include information Law, intellectual property law and Electronic Commercial Law. Chris has a very keen research interest in intellectual property law (copyright, trademarks, patents, confidential information), information technology law (relating to computers, the internet and technology) and contract law.

Professor Robert Hudson - Robert is a professor of History.  He specialises in the history of Russia and Eastern Europe, but is also interested in twentieth-century French history.

Dr David Holloway - Senior Lecturer. His research interests include 19th and 20th Century American literature and film, narratives of apocalypse in American culture, and the “War on Terror”. He has published a number of articles on the novelist Cormac McCarthy and has written a chapter on the literature of youth in Radiant Hour (2000). His book on Cormac McCarthy was published in 2002 and 9/11 and the War on Terror was published in 2008.  He is also the co-editor of American Visual Cultures (2005).

Dr Thomas Neuhaus - Tom is a Senior Lecturer in History. He teaches international history, focusing on relations between Europe and Asia in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. He has published a book on Tibet in the Western imagination.

Personal academic tutoring

Your personal academic tutor will work with you to help you get the most out of your time at university. Having someone to talk to about your academic progress, your university experience and your professional aspirations is hugely valuable. We want you to feel challenged in your studies, stretched but confident to achieve your academic and professional goals.

Find out more about personal academic tutoring

Who will teach you

Dr Francesco Belcastro
Programme leader

Francesco Belcastro is a Lecturer and the programme leader of International Relations at the College of Business, Law and Social Sciences here at the University of Derby. He is currently the admissions tutor for International Relations and Diplomacy. He is also a Fellow of the Centre for Syrian Studies, University of St Andrews.

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Entry requirements

September 2020 typical entry requirements

RequirementWhat we're looking for
UCAS points112* (up to 16 from AS-levels)
Specific requirements at A-level

At least a C in any Social Science subjects such as History, Citizenship, Sociology or Politics at A Level (or equivalent qualification)

Specific requirements at GCSEGCSE Maths and English Grade C/Grade 4 (or above) or equivalent qualification
Interview / AuditionN/A
PortfolioN/A

Alternative entry qualifications:

For joint honours degree entry you will need to choose two subjects. The entry criteria here is for this subject only. Your offer will be based on the higher entry criteria from the two subjects you choose to do. A good application/performance will be taken into account if you do not meet the criteria/offer conditions.

*The UCAS Points required for entry will depend on the subjects you choose to combine. The subject with the higher entry requirements will determine your offer.

Our entry requirements for this course should be read together with the University's general entry requirements, which details subjects we accept, alternative qualifications and what we're looking for at Derby.

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Fees and funding

2020/21 Fees

 Full-timePart-time
UK/EU

£9,250 per year*

N/A

International

£14,045 per year

N/A

* The fees stated above are for the 2019/20 academic year; fees for 2020/21 have not yet been confirmed by the UK government. We will update this information as soon as it is available.

Further information about our fees and support you may be entitled to.

Additional costs and optional extras

How to apply

UK/EU students

Full-time students applying to start in September should apply for this course through UCAS or you can apply directly to the University for an undergraduate course if you’re not applying to any other UK university in the same year.

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Guidance for EU students post-Brexit

International students

Full-time students applying to start in September should apply for this course through UCAS or you can apply directly to the University for an undergraduate course if you’re not applying to any other UK university in the same year.

Apply through UCASApply directly to the University

Guidance for international applicants applying for an undergraduate degree

Careers

A broad choice

As an International Relations and Diplomacy graduate, you could pursue a career working for government embassies, international institutions and agencies, international development organisations, public and voluntary bodies or transnational corporations. You could also work in many other fields, including teaching, political analysis, media, law, the civil service, and the uniformed services.

Skills for success

Your degree will help set you apart as an independent and confident individual who can view the world from different perspectives. Your experience of work-based learning - through study visits and internship opportunities with international organisations such as the UN and UNITAR - will signal to any prospective employer that you are adept at linking international relations and diplomacy theories to practice.

As the business world becomes increasingly global, your knowledge of international politics, together with your understanding of the complex relations between governments around the world, will help you to secure a rewarding career.

Ensuring you’re ‘work-ready’

Our Careers and Employment Service will provide you with support from day one of your course to ensure that you leave Derby as a ‘work-ready’ graduate - industry aware, motivated and enterprising. Throughout your studies, you will also benefit from our Personal Development Planning (PDP) scheme which enables you to reflect on your learning and develop your career ambitions. The support continues once you’ve completed your course too: you are entitled to further help and guidance from the Careers and Employment Service for up to three years after leaving the University.

Contact us

If you need any more information from us, eg on courses, accommodation, applying, car parking, fees or funding, please contact us and we will do everything we can to help you.

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Additional information about your studies

You will typically study your two subjects equally at stage one, before choosing whether you want to major in one subject at stages two and three.

Download programme specification

Teaching hours

Like most universities, we operate extended teaching hours at the University of Derby, so contact time with your lecturers and tutors could be anytime between 9am and 9pm. Your timetable will usually be available on the website 24 hours after enrolment on to your course.

Additional costs and optional extras

We’re committed to providing you with an outstanding learning experience. Our expert teaching, excellent facilities and great employability prepare you for your future career. As part of our commitment to you we aim to keep any additional study costs to a minimum. However, there are occasions where students may incur some additional costs.

Included in your fees

Please note: Our courses are refreshed and updated on a regular basis. If you are thinking about transferring onto this course (into the second year for example), you should contact the programme leader for the relevant course information as modules may vary from those shown on this page.

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International Relations and Diplomacy can be combined with:

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For this combination Discover Uni does not have enough data to publish a widget. It is important to note that this is not a reflection on the quality of the course.

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For this combination Discover Uni does not have enough data to publish a widget. It is important to note that this is not a reflection on the quality of the course.

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For this combination Discover Uni does not have enough data to publish a widget. It is important to note that this is not a reflection on the quality of the course.

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For this combination Discover Uni does not have enough data to publish a widget. It is important to note that this is not a reflection on the quality of the course.

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For this combination Discover Uni does not have enough data to publish a widget. It is important to note that this is not a reflection on the quality of the course.

View course

For this combination Discover Uni does not have enough data to publish a widget. It is important to note that this is not a reflection on the quality of the course.

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