Course details

Study options

Full-time: 4 years

UK/EU fee

£9,250 per year (2020/21)

International fee

£14,045 per year (2020/21)

UCAS points

72 (September 2021 entry)

UCAS code

ML97

Course level

Undergraduate

Qualification

BSc (Hons)

Start date

September

Location

One Friar Gate Square, Derby Campus

Course description

The highlights

Adara smiling wearing hair in a ponytail

I have always had an interest in investigative crime and the motivations for why people commit crime. When I heard of the Criminology Psychology degree, it matched my interests perfectly.

Adara Lloyd
Graduate

Foundation Year - helping you to achieve more

Including a foundation year as part of your four-year study programme will give you a head start in your academic and professional life. The foundation year offers the chance to strengthen your skills, knowledge and confidence – with extensive support from our expert staff – before you advance to stage one of your honours degree. It could also be beneficial if you are planning a career change and want to get to grips with aspects of subjects which are new to you.

Our degrees with a foundation year are continuous, meaning that you won’t need to apply again once you have successfully completed the first year.

About the course

How does criminal behaviour develop? Are psychopaths born or made? Are eyewitnesses accurate? How should we rehabilitate offenders? These are just some of the challenging questions you will explore on our stimulating degree. 

We are one of the few universities in the UK to offer an integrated degree dedicated to the intersection between psychology and the criminal justice system. Forensic and criminal psychology is increasingly used to inform practice within the justice system and there is a growing demand for professionals who can draw on knowledge of the subject in a wide range of roles and contexts.

Our BSc (Hons) Forensic and Criminal Psychology enables you to apply psychological theories, methods and research to some of the critical challenges facing the criminal justice system today.

You will cover all the main areas of psychology and gain a thorough understanding of complex issues such as criminal behaviour and the personal consequences of crime. There is the chance to focus on specialist areas ranging from cybercrime to domestic abuse, hate crime to psychopathy, mentally disordered offenders to substance misuse. Among the latest additions to the portfolio are optional modules in subjects such as addictive behaviours and schizophrenia.

Throughout, we emphasise the importance of evidence-based practice so you will research real-life criminal justice problems and seek pragmatic solutions to address those problems.

Professional recognition

Our BSc (Hons) Forensic and Criminal Psychology course is accredited by the British Psychological Society (BPS). As long as you achieve at least a second class honours qualification and obtain at least 40% in your Independent Study in Psychology - you will be eligible for the Graduate Basis for Chartered Membership (GBC) of the society. This is the first step to becoming a chartered psychologist. 

The next step you will need to complete is a Stage One accredited postgraduate qualification, which we offer in our MSc Forensic and Criminal Psychology. Following this, you must complete Stage Two towards becoming a Forensic Psychologist, which is the independent training route. Trainees will complete eight pieces of work, taking a minimum of two years, in the following areas: conducting psychological applications and interventions, research, communicating psychological knowledge and advice to other professionals and training other professionals in psychological skills and knowledge. All of these activities are supervised by a registered Forensic Psychologist. Successful submission and HCPC registration leads to qualification as a Forensic Psychologist.

Hands-on learning

We have strong links with a wide range of criminal and community justice agencies including the police, probation services, prisons, youth justice, courts and victim support organisations.  These enrich your learning and open the door for you to undertake independent research projects.

During your second year, as part of the Qualitative Methods module, you will complete a 30-hour volunteering placement. We also encourage you to take up additional volunteering opportunities throughout the degree to add substance to your CV and to ensure you are ‘workplace-ready’ on graduating.

The BSc (Hons) Forensic and Criminal Psychology also features field trips to courts and prisons (subject to availability of the facilities). 

Extra qualifications

If you have a particular interest in youth justice, this course gives you the chance to achieve an additional professional qualification – the Youth Justice in Effective Practice Certificate (YJEPC) – alongside your degree studies.

The YJEPC is the most widely held qualification in youth justice and brings together current theory, practice and evidence. It will not only boost your employability in the eyes of potential employers but also help you to make more effective judgements in your future career.

The opportunity to gain the YJEPC is available if you take two specific modules – Working with Young Offenders and Youth Justice.  

Expert teaching

Supporting you all the way is our team of enthusiastic and experienced lecturers who are experts in their fields. They include chartered psychologists as well as sociologists, experienced police officers and lawyers. Several are still actively engaged with practice, which helps you keep up to date with the latest developments.

Your learning will be underpinned by the internationally renowned research activities of our staff who are helping to shape understanding and practice across the criminal justice sector. Their expertise spans thought-provoking topics such as psychopathy, dark triad, sex offenders, domestic violence, personality disorders and evolutionary psychology.  It all means your modules will feature latest thinking and contemporary materials.

Guest speakers include professionals who have pursued a career in the criminal justice sector and who will share their own experiences of criminal psychology. 

Equipment and resources

As a Forensic and Criminal Psychology student, you’ll be based on the Derby Campus at One Friar Gate Square. Offering the perfect environment for innovative and engaging teaching, it includes well-resourced lecture theatres, seminar rooms, computer laboratories and social learning spaces.

You’ll be able to gain practical experience of investigative processes using our facilities which include a mock courtroom and replica police custody suite.

Because you’ll be working alongside students taking courses in subjects such as law, sociology and policing, there are many opportunities to share knowledge, expertise and experience. 

Real-world research

We will prepare you to become a competent researcher yourself, equipped with the skills to analyse data and policies critically and to contribute to original criminal psychology knowledge. 

As part of the course, you will pursue independent research into themes matching your career ambitions and intellectual interests. You may also have the chance to get involved in staff research projects where feasible and to present your work at relevant conferences.

 

What you will study

Foundation YearFoundation YearYear 1Year 1Year 2Year 2Year 3Year 3

Code: 3HU502

Study Skills

This module will introduce you to the academic skills needed for study at undergraduate level, and enable you to plan for both your future study and your career. The focus of the module is developing the analytical and critical skills essential to studying humanities and social science subjects at degree level.
20 Credits
core
Coursework

Code: 3LA501

Law

This module equips you with an understanding of the English legal system. Looking at sources of law and considering the impact of European Community Law, and the European Convention on Human Rights, you will then examine the relationship between law, morality and justice. Finally moving on to explore the fundamental differences between civil and criminal law and process and liability.
20 Credits
core
Practical
Coursework

Code: 3PS500

Fundamentals of Human Behaviour

This module will introduce students to psychology as an integrated and multi-faceted discipline. Students will explore both classic and contemporary aspects of psychology from a position of little or no knowledge. They will gain an understanding of the breadth of psychology and the ways in which the topic areas included can be approached from a number of different theoretical perspectives using a variety of methodological approaches.
20 Credits
core
Coursework

Code: 3SL501

Sociology

This module provides you with an introduction to the study of sociology. It is intended to encourage an understanding of core sociological theories, and to foster an awareness of sociological issues and phenomena. It is designed to develop your appreciation of how we evaluate the social world

The module emphasises core sociological theoretical perspectives, which include Marxism, feminism and functionalism. Theoretical perspectives are compared in their application to, and interpretation of, various social phenomena. The module aims to provide you with a basic of understanding of how we evaluate the lived experience and covers a range of topics in relation to the research process including; statistics, data gathering methods and how evidence is presented.

More information
20 Credits
core
Practical
Coursework

Code: 2MO500

English

This is a level 2 module. The module is oriented towards providing students with sufficient English skills to enable them to engage confidently with level 4 modules.
20 Credits
optional
Coursework

Code: 2MO501

Mathematics

The course is equivalent to GCSE Maths and covers statistics and probability, number work, geometry, and algebra and graphs.
20 Credits
optional
Exam
Coursework

Code: 3HU504

Culture and Ideas

This wide-ranging module introduces and explains the cultural, philosophical, artistic and historical evolution and development of society over approximately the last 3,000 years.

Focusing principally on western Europe from ancient Egypt, Greece and Rome to the present day, but encompassing a range of world civilisations, religions and philosophies, the module’s teaching will give students a clear framework and contextual understanding of some of the main trends, developments and historical concepts that collectively underpin the values, mores and ethics of modern society, as well as giving students a general foundational understanding of the political, artistic, cultural and historical trends that are important for an understanding of today’s world

 

More information
20 Credits
optional
Coursework

Code: 3PO501

Political Studies

This module will introduce you to a range of key issues and approaches taken in the study of Politics at undergraduate level. Understanding Politics as the study of competing interests within society, the module addresses questions such as the differences between - and the different forms taken by - democratic, totalitarian and theocratic political systems; the relationships between foreign and domestic policy; and the influence of economics on political debate and decision-making. As well as introducing you to key debates and approaches, the module will also encourage you to develop the critical thinking, writing and analytical skills you will need to study Politics at degree-level.
20 Credits
optional
Practical
Coursework

Code: 4CJ521

Introduction to Criminological Theory

The module provides students with an introduction to the study of criminology. This module will explain what the roots of criminological theory are and will map both historical and contemporary theoretical debates. It outlines a range of theoretical perspectives and debates that inform criminology as a field of study. Students develop foundation knowledge of the main perspectives in criminology and how they have been applied to generate criminological knowledge. The module explores the key schools of thought on criminology, beginning with the early origins of criminology and the Classical School. Seminal works and key theorists of the 19th and 20th centuries are explored and examined, giving students an overview of criminological thought up to the present day.

The module covers feminist perspectives, radical theories, and integrated theories of criminology. Students will be able to make connections between theories of crime and crime control policies. Criminological theories will also be evaluated in relation to empirical evidence. By the end of the module, students will have a sound understanding of the core attempts to explain criminal behaviour, and will be able to critique these theoretical accounts which underpin their learning in the criminology programme.

More information
20 Credits
core
Coursework

Code: 4CR500

Introducing Biological and Social Forensic and Criminal Psychology

This module is the first in a two-module set (Biological and Social Forensic and Criminal Psychology and Cognitive and Developmental Forensic and Criminal Psychology) which will introduce the student to the central psychological perspectives and theories (paradigms) relevant to the understanding of both human and criminal behaviour; thus, preparing the student for further study into the field of criminal psychology.

Specifically, this module will introduce the student the first two of the five key paradigms (or psychological fields); biological and social psychology of human and criminal behaviours. In particular, how each paradigm has developed since the emergence of modern psychology with be discussed and the following questions will be addressed:

  • How can we understand criminal behaviour from a genetic perspective?
  • How do social perspectives explain offending behaviours?
  • What are the biological and social risk factors that might help to predict offending behaviours?

By taking this module, the student will be well prepared to discuss human behaviour (both normal and abnormal) from a nature verses nurture perspective, as well as the utility of these perspectives within the Criminal Justice System.

More information
20 Credits
core
Coursework

Code: 4CR501

Reporting Forensic and Criminal Psychology

The very foundation of forensic and criminal psychology is research methods, and as a result, this module is key to the students’ emerging understanding of the field. This module underpins Introduction into Research Methods in Psychology and Quantitative Methods and Individual Differences and Qualitative Methods: The individual in Society (taken at L5), and Advanced Knowledge Production and Forensic and Criminal Psychology Dissertation (taken at L6).

In this introductory module students will be introduced to central concepts within forensic psychology research. Some of the central themes in the module are “what is research?”, “what can we learn from research?”, and “how do we actually conduct research?” Through a series of lectures, tutorials, and independent study, students will gain knowledge related to the design and planning of applied research (including ethical considerations), which will culminate in the submission of a group based small research proposal.

More information
20 Credits
core
Coursework

Code: 4CR503

Introducing Cognitive and Developmental Forensic and Criminal Psychology

This module is the second in a two-module set (Biological and Social Forensic and Criminal Psychology and Cognitive and Developmental Forensic and Criminal Psychology) which introduces the student to the central psychological perspectives and theories relevant to understanding both human and criminal behaviour; thus preparing the student for further study into the field of forensic psychology.

In particular, this module will introduce students to a further two of the five key psychological areas, which are the cognitive and developmental paradigms of human and criminal behaviour. The development of each paradigm will be introduced and discussed in terms of their emergence, their key scholars and general theories, and how they might be used to explain criminal behaviour. For example, the following questions will be addressed:

  • How does cognitive psychology help us to understand how offenders perceive and understand the world around them?
  • How does criminal behaviour typically change across the life course?
  • What are the cognitive and developmental risk factors that might help to predict offending behaviours?

By taking this module, the student will be well prepared to discuss human behaviour (both normal and abnormal) from a cognitive and developmental perspective, as well as the utility of these perspectives within the Criminal Justice System. 

More information
20 Credits
core
Coursework

Code: 4PS501

Does Psychology Matter?

This module will introduce students to Psychology as a critical discipline. As such, the module aims to use a number of key topic areas through which to explore how psychologists discuss and debate such issues.

The module will impress upon students the need to use evidence to support arguments, to recognise and consider alternative viewpoints and to construct their arguments with care and precision. Furthermore it will help to promote such key transferable skills as critical thinking, argument construction, and communication which will be of benefit to the student in both their academic studies and future employment. Teaching on the module will be by a mixture of interactive lectures and informal, small group debate and discussion.

More information
20 Credits
core
Coursework

Code: 4PS520

Introduction to Research Methods in Psychology

The purpose of this module is to provide students with an introduction to the key principles underlying research methods in psychology. Students will be taught the need for systematic research methods and will explore the relationship between theory and data in both quantitative and qualitative research.

Students will learn key principles in research design and will engage in the practical aspects of generating quantitative and qualitative research data. Students will learn how to analyse quantitative and qualitative data and how to report the findings of simple psychological studies in a standardised format.

More information
20 Credits
core
Coursework

Code: 5CR500

Themes in Criminal Psychology

The module focuses on psychological theories of crime and criminal etiology. The module will cover an exploration, via case studies, of questions raised by the presence of crime and 'the criminal' in society. There will be a critical evaluation of the differing international approaches to offender profiling including an overview of contemporary developments of profiling as a ‘science’, a review of the findings from work in this area, applications and implications and an evaluation of how effective offender profiling is in practice. An investigation will take place into issues relating to the psychology of police investigations, including, but not limited to, police interviewing and eyewitness testimonies.
20 Credits
core
Coursework

Code: 5CR501

Applied Biological and Social Forensic and Criminal Psychology

This module is the first in a two-module set (Applied Biological and Social Forensic and Criminal Psychology and Applied Cognitive and Developmental Forensic and Criminal Psychology). It will address key debates in biological and social psychology in the context of offending behaviours.

In the first half of this module the biological component of this module will provide students with a critical understanding of the relationship between brain functioning and offending behaviour.

You will examine the biological bases of a range of behaviours and will consider how research in biological psychology can contribute to the understanding of criminal behaviour. Through case studies, questions such as ‘what influence the brain has on our behavior?’, ‘can neurobiological abnormalities explain criminal behavior?’, and ‘to what extent do genetic and environmental factors contribute to these abnormalities?

In addition, the possibility that biological factors may aid in the prediction of future crime and violence will be explored. The second half of the module will consider how we perceive and process information, how our cognitions help us make sense of our surroundings, how we interact with others and how those interactions are understood and managed.

Together, the biological and social paradigms will be used to further understand criminal behaviours, the consequences of criminal behaviour, and the rehabilitative approaches related to biological and social psychology. The module will also cover an exploration, via case studies, of questions raised by the presence of 'the criminal' in society and the psychological effects of being a victim of crime.

More information
20 Credits
core
Coursework

Code: 5CR505

Applied Cognitive and Developmental Forensic and Criminal Psychology

This module is the second in a two-module set (Applied Biological and Social Forensic and Criminal Psychology and Applied Cognitive and Developmental Forensic and Criminal Psychology). Building on 4CR503 (Introducing Cognitive and Developmental Forensic and Criminal Psychology), this module will address key debates in cognitive and developmental psychology.

The first half of the module will consider how we perceive and process information, how our cognitions help us make sense of our surroundings, how we interact with others and how those interactions are understood and managed. This will be considered in the context of the offender as well as other player in the criminal justice system such as eyewitnesses, jurors, and expert witnesses.

From the perspective of the developmental paradigm, this module aims to further develop students’ understanding of concepts, theories, and methods relevant to the study of lifespan developmental in forensic psychology. The origin of developmental/life-course forensic psychological research will be traced.

Focus will be given to the suggestion that there are initiation points for criminal activity, along with points of termination. Together, the cognitive and developmental paradigms will be used to further understand criminal behaviours, the consequences of criminal behaviour, and the rehabilitative approaches related to cognitive and developmental psychology. The module will also cover an exploration, via case studies, of questions raised by the cognitive effect on victims or survivors of crime.

More information
20 Credits
core
Coursework

Code: 5CR506

Victimology

Victims of crime attract unprecedented academic interest, both as a subject of psychological enquiry, and as a focus of criminal justice policy. Since the 1960s, victimisation surveys have aimed to quantify the unreported ‘dark figure’ of crime and have thus helped to build interest in this area. The need to protect the rights of victims has become increasingly important in terms of public opinion and judicial practice. This has given rise to revisions in sentencing and the advent of restorative justice. The rights of victims are now viewed as an integral part of criminal justice.

Whilst societal views and criminal justice responses have impacted upon victims and their status, it is of importance to understand the physical, social, psychological and emotional effects they might face in context of the primary offence. Therefore, both societal and psychological effects will therefore be explored within this module.

More information
20 Credits
core
Coursework

Code: 5PS509

Quantitative Methods and Individual Differences

This module advances the concepts of quantitative research methods that were introduced to students at Level 4 using the study of individual differences. Students will be introduced to traditional areas and prominent thinkers in the areas of personality and intelligence theory, before moving onto more specific areas of psychology where the differences between individuals has been researched.

Alongside this, students will learn how to design and conduct appropriate experimental and quasi-experimental investigations of a range of individual differences variables. They will also be introduced to elementary scale development for the testing of individual differences within psychology.

More information
20 Credits
core
Coursework

Code: 5PS536

Qualitative Methods: The Individual in Society

This module introduces a range of qualitative methods used within contemporary psychology and explores the different insights these approaches bring to the area of individual differences. The module will be divided into sections which each introduce a different qualitative method. In addition, the underlying assumptions which inform psychological research into individual differences such as gender, identity, health and so on are examined.

The range of philosophical orientations and methodological approaches covered in the module enables students to consider the ways in which the individual and their engagement with the social world can be explored from a qualitative perspective. This module also provides students with an opportunity to engage with an employment (or voluntary) experience.

More information
20 Credits
core
Coursework

Code: 6CR500

Advanced Knowledge Production

This module builds upon knowledge gained at L4 and L5 in the following modules: - Reporting Forensic and Criminal Psychology - Introduction into Research Methods in Psychology - Quantitative Methods and Individual Differences - Qualitative Methods: The individual in Society In addition, it supports the L6 Criminal Psychology Dissertation module. The aim of this module is to further develop students’ skills as independent knowledge producers. Students will be supported through the process of developing a research question for their final year dissertation, producing rationale and design for that study, and applying for and gaining ethical approval before commencing their research.
20 Credits
core
Coursework

Code: 6CR999

Independent Research Project

The final year dissertation aims to provide students with the opportunity to undertake an in-depth, empirical investigation of a psychological problem or topic. The dissertation is supported through workshops (Advanced Knowledge Production) which are designed to 'scaffold' students throughout the first semester. Here students are expected to identify an area for research, design a research project (qualitative or quantitative), carry it out, and disseminate the results to appropriate audiences.

Depending on the students’ chosen topic, they will be allocated a suitable supervisor. Examples of topics for their projects are:

  • Attitudes toward sentencing
  • The experience of working with offenders
  • Perceived effectiveness of youth initiatives 


Wider research dissemination is encouraged.

More information
40 Credits
core
Coursework

Code: 6CJ501

Cybercrime

This module examines cybercrime as one of the fastest-growing criminal activities and explores the transformation of criminal activity in the information age. The module will examine issues such as: the automation of offender victim engagement; policing online deviance; practical, ethical and legal issues for the detection, investigation and prosecution of cybercrime; the global nature of many cybercrimes; the relevance and applicability of existing criminological theory to a range of cybercrimes; predicting future challenges of cybercrimes for individuals, the criminal justice system and society as a whole.
20 Credits
optional
Coursework

Code: 6CJ503

Hate, Ethnicity and Crime

The social, cultural, political and religious landscapes of Britain have changed dramatically over the last fifteen years. The terrorist attacks in New York and London, the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, responses to asylum and immigration, the rise of far-right politics and new criminal justice legislation have all had an impact on issues of hate, ethnicity and crime. Conceptualising and accurately defining hate crime is no easy task, considering the plethora of ambiguities that arise from social norms and accepted notions of difference, identity and group belonging. Hall (2005) argued that crimes perpetrated because of a person’s ethnicity are predominately based on prejudice.

This module, therefore, will first seek to define prejudice and stereotyping and then move to discuss processes of discrimination, intolerance, hate crimes and violent acts. The origins and historical context of hate crimes will be analysed, as will the confusion/resentment which may be driven by social and cultural change.

More information
20 Credits
optional
Coursework

Code: 6CJ510

Youth Justice

This module brings together the current state of theory, practice and evidence to give you the knowledge, confidence and knowledge base and transferable skills around working with young people at risk of offending. It will also give you the framework to assess new ideas and evidence arising in the future. The module is taught in three blocks; block one introduces you to the youth justice system operating in England and Wales providing you with a historical perspective on how the system has evolved over time and how it compares with systems in other countries. You are encouraged to reflect on political and social attitudes to young people and their impact on responses to youth crime. The second element focuses on theories of youth offending and provides you with an opportunity to consider the question, ‘why do young people commit crimes?’.

You will develop your understanding of the theoretical perspectives introduced at Level 4 that have emerged in an attempt to explain youth crime and will have the opportunity to apply these theories to the case studies of five young people that will be introduced to you during this module. The final block looks at current practice in youth justice and how the ‘what works’ movement has developed, you will also consider some of the frameworks that have been developed for judging the quality and reliability of research and the challenges this raises.

You can undertake this module alongside the sister module - Working with Young Offenders in the Spring Semester - to build towards the Youth Justice in Effective Practice Certificate, an industry recognised practitioner-based certificate, awarded by UNITAS and endorsed by Skills for Justice. Since it was introduced in 2012 the YJEPC has been used by over half of Youth Offending Teams to enhance their members’ skills and knowledge. It is also used by the secure estate, individuals seeking to advance a career in youth justice and volunteers looking to widen their knowledge.

More information
20 Credits
optional
Coursework

Code: 6CJ538

Crime, Media and Culture

Since the beginning of cinema, crime has been a mainstay of modern media: The Australian film, The Ned Kelly Gang (1906) is commemorated in the UNESCO ‘Memory of the World Register’ as the oldest surviving feature film. Even before then, pamphlets and chapbooks recounting the exploits of notorious criminals circulated as popular forms of entertainment. The 21st Century has seen no lessening of the representation of crimes, criminality and deviance in the mass media. Film and television rely on tropes of criminal families, extremes of criminal behaviour, policing and crime detection for a range of entertainment products; news on all media repeatedly feature crime stories whilst video games place players in the roles of both law enforcers and perpetrators of crime. In all of these instances the texts rehearse and confirm boundaries of legally sanctioned behaviours and, simultaneously, the pleasures of transgression.

They also serve to define and reproduce stereotypes and preconceived notions of criminals, their victims, enforcers and the locations of crime. This module thus serves to explore the tension between the representation of crime and the impact of these representations on wider culture and society.

More information
20 Credits
optional
Coursework

Code: 6CJ539

Sexual Violence, Exploitation and Abuse

This module explores the sexual violence, exploitation and abuse of women, children and men. In particular, it focuses upon the impact on victims and the responses of voluntary and state services. It starts by unpacking what is meant by ‘sexual violence’, analysing social attitudes, myths, moral panics and the impact on contemporary society. Here, the focus is on sexual politics, the control of sexual behaviours and philosophical approaches to sex and sexuality. Secondly, the module considers violence against women, men and children with an emphasis on policy and practice, considering the role of practitioners in supporting victims of sexual crimes. There will be an exploration of the responses of the criminal justice system, including changing policy and practice and competing theories on supporting victims of sexual violence. As a result, this module provides both a broad theoretical framework and applied knowledge for those students seeking to work with victims of sexual violence.
20 Credits
optional
Coursework

Code: 6CJ540

Substance Misuse

The misuse/use of illegal and legal drugs is of growing concern across many areas of health and social care provision. The trade in illicit drugs is a global issue, crossing international boundaries, and creating threats to public health and political stability in many countries. The use of legal drugs such as alcohol and tobacco has been recognised as contributing toward a significant expenditure in the NHS. In addition to the impact of substance use/misuse to the UK as a whole, it is also important to consider the potential impact on the individual user and their close social networks. This module aims to provide you with an overview of the substances used in contemporary society, their effects on the individual and impact on public health. Social policy, linked to drug use, will be considered at a national and international level acknowledging substance use/misuse as a global issue. The treatment options available in the UK will also be considered within the module.
20 Credits
optional
Coursework

Code: 6CJ542

Working with Young Offenders

This module provides you with the practical skills as well as the theoretical underpinning, to work with young people at risk of offending. It will give you the knowledge that you need to make informed decisions about the interventions which offer the best prospect of success in a particular case. It will also guide ways of implementing interventions that will engage and involve young people. You will consider the structural cycle of interventions and the key components of assessment, planning and review.

You will also evaluate safeguarding issues and the diversity of young people in determining the most appropriate interventions. The significance of building and sustaining relationships with young people at all stages of the cycle in order to promote positive outcomes will be explored and you will have the opportunity to develop your understanding of communication strategies by young offenders. Finally, the role that desistance can play in ensuring continued change will be considered through transition planning. This module can be taken alongside the sister module – Youth Justice in the Autumn Semester to build towards the Youth Justice in Effective Practice Certificate, an industry recognised practitioner based certificate, awarded by UNITAS and endorsed by Skills for Justice.

More information
20 Credits
optional
Coursework

Code: 6CJ542

Working with Young Offenders

This module provides you with the practical skills as well as the theoretical underpinning to work with young people at risk of offending. It will give you the knowledge that you need to make informed decisions about the interventions which offer the best prospect of success in a particular case. It will also guide you to ways of implementing interventions that will engage and involve young people and hence has an applied element. The module is taught in two blocks, with an optional third if you wish to undertake the Certificate. In the first block you will consider the structural cycle of interventions and the key components of assessment, planning and review. You are encouraged to explore different approaches to assessment and consider the importance of linking assessments to intervention planning.

You will also evaluate safeguarding issues and the diversity of young people in determining the most appropriate interventions. Having looked at the cycle of intervention, block two explores the significance of building and sustaining relationships with young people at all stages of the cycle in order to promote positive outcomes. You will have the opportunity to develop your understanding of communication strategies by young offenders as well as enhance your own applied skills with a practical focus.

You can undertake this module alongside the sister module - Youth Justice - in the Autumn Semester to build towards the Youth Justice in Effective Practice Certificate, an industry recognised practitioner based certificate, awarded by UNITAS and endorsed by Skills for Justice. Since it was introduced in 2012 the YJEPC has been used by over half of the Youth Offending Teams to enhance their members’ skills and knowledge. It is also used by the secure estate, individuals seeking to advance a career in youth justice and volunteers looking to widen their knowledge.

More information
20 Credits
optional
Coursework

Code: 6CJ546

Murder: Dynamics, Pathologies and Investigation

Accounts of murder are commonplace in today’s world. Whilst they fixate both public and media attention, beyond the simplicity of newspaper headlines the offence of murder often involves complex underlying dynamics, psychological pathologies, detailed investigative procedures, and a legal framework for sentencing and punishment. In this module, students travel the chronology of murder, from the development of a killer’s psychology through to the commission of the offence(s), their investigation, and then sentencing. Students will see, from crime scene to trial, the complex tasks of both understanding, and investigating, murderers and their crimes.
20 Credits
optional
Coursework

Code: 6CR501

Psychopathy

The focus of this module is to acquire in-depth knowledge and develop a critical evaluation of central issues within the psychopathy research field. Through scheduled lectures and seminars the students will gain an understanding of, and learn how to critically evaluate, the psychopathy construct, how to measure psychopathic traits, etiology (“nature versus nurture”), the relationship between psychopathic traits and criminality, and criminal justice interventions. Furthermore, the role of psychopathy in the broader criminal justice system will be discussed Please note that this module will concentrate on psychopathy as an academic research field.
20 Credits
optional
Coursework

Code: 6CR502

Offenders with Mental and Intellectual Disabilities

The general public, rightly or wrongly, often view offenders with mental and intellectual disabilities as dangerous individuals, whose unpredictable behaviour provokes fear. But what is a mental and intellectual disability in the context of an offending behaviour? Do mental and/or intellectual disabilities cause offending? Can offending exacerbate underlying mental and /or intellectual disabilities? How should the mental health care and criminal justice systems respond to crime?

This module aims to answer these questions by critically analysing the relationship between mental and intellectual disabilities and offending behaviours, as well as critically examining how societal change, legislation, and government policy have impacted on the treatment or imprisonment of offenders with mental and intellectual disabilities. The provisions of the Mental Health Act 2007 will be considered in the context of public safety.

More information
20 Credits
optional
Coursework

Code: 6CR505

Working with Offenders

This module offers students the opportunity to explore the issues, and practicalities, involved in working with, and rehabilitating, offenders. How do practitioners justify decisions made within practice in response to complex situations? The module aims to build understanding of the framework of structured intervention which operates within the probation and prison services, and of the matching of offenders to appropriate interventions. It explains and identifies appropriate theoretical models and concepts for assessment and intervention and their appropriate application to offender management. The module also identifies problems within professional practice and applies problem-solving approaches to their resolution and evaluation.

The module provides students with a taught element, providing them with the required knowledge base to explore this topic. There are areas of practical activity (dependent on availability): prison visits and talks with offenders, offender managers, and prison officers Planning appropriate and proportionate responses to the risks posed by, and needs of, offenders and balancing rights and public protection is considered. The values and ethics that underpin practice frameworks are analysed and decision-making about appropriate and proportionate intervention, balancing rights and risks, is explored. The application of the principles of promoting equality, and valuing diversity and anti-discriminatory practice, in working with offenders is explored.

More information
20 Credits
optional
Coursework

Code: 6CR506

The Use and Abuse of Psychological Theory

This module explores use and abuse of various psychological mechanisms in everyday life and specifically in application to criminal psychology. An investigation into various fields of psychology and their reflection in crime and crime prevention measures will examine the duality of many psychological processes and concepts.

The students will be able to explore both use and abuse of basic psychological processes and mechanisms on the various levels – from individual to organisations and society, - and from various points of view (victims and perpetrators). The methods and tools to prevent and/or withstand such abuse will be introduced, reviewed and discussed in this module.

More information
20 Credits
optional
Coursework

Code: 6LA548

Domestic Abuse

Students will explore the definitions of domestic violence (DV) used by the various agencies involved in this area before analysing the nature and prevalence of DV and identifying the victims and perpetrators. The legal and medical responses to victims and perpetrators will also be examined and will be further evaluated by taking a psychological approach to the dynamics of abuse.
20 Credits
optional
Coursework

Code: 6PS500

Addictive Behaviours

The module critically examines contemporary psychological approaches to the understanding of substance use and addiction. Students will consider the relative contributions of psychological theories from the fields of biological, behavioural, social and cognitive psychology to understanding, treatment and prevention of addictions, including those not involving consumption of substances.
20 Credits
optional
Coursework

Code: 6PS503

Autism, Asperger’s and ADHD

This module introduces three major interrelated childhood developmental disorders. Students will be encouraged to consider the often fine-lines between Autistic Disorders, Asperger’s Disorder and the subtypes of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder. The module draws heavily on a wealth of fascinating research and theory but also considers the individual experience and characteristics of people with these diagnoses.

Topics might covered include, social and communication impairment, theory of mind, weak central coherence theory and executive dysfunction, savant ability, behavioural and pharmacological treatment, classification, diagnosis and developmental outcomes. The module is presented in a series of lectures and seminars where students can develop an understanding of these conditions. Students will also have the opportunity to meet and learn from practitioners working in the field of Autism, Asperger’s and ADHD.

More information
20 Credits
optional
Exam

Code: 6PS509

Human Behaviour and Evolution

Evolutionary psychology is a new and rapidly developing area which attempts to situate explanations for human behaviour within a Darwinian framework. This module will critically examine the utility of evolutionary principles as a causal explanation for behaviours including an understanding of its theoretical and methodological underpinnings.

The module will explore how evolutionary theory can be used to understand human psychology across a wide range of behaviours such as co-operation, aggression, group living and religious belief. The module takes a very student led approach; with the basic principles of evolutionary psychology being introduced as lectures in the first weeks of teaching, following which all learning takes the form of formal debates.

More information
20 Credits
optional
Practical
Coursework

Code: 6PS513

The Dark Side of Psychology

This module explores the dark and hidden history of psychology which is often neglected in conventional textbooks. An investigation of the history of psychology examines the claim that psychology is a science by exploring the epistemological and methodological development of the discipline.

Psychology’s claim to be an objective science is critically examined with an exploration of topics such as scientific racism and sexism. Key figures in psychology and related areas such as the eugenics movement will be discussed. Furthermore, this module explores the ways in which psychology has been used to legitimise the oppression of certain groups within society.

More information
20 Credits
optional
Coursework

Code: 6PS540

Schizophrenia

Schizophrenia is one of the most fascinating mental illnesses. There are a number of myths that surround the disorder and many lay people think that a schizophrenic person is someone to be feared. This module is designed to look at the research surrounding schizophrenia and will include research from all aspects of the disorder.

We will look at the signs and symptoms and the way in which schizophrenia has been reclassified under DSM V. We will look at explanations of schizophrenia that will include biological, psychodynamic, evolutionary, cognitive and social dimensions. The module will also look at a wide range of therapies from the use of antipsychotic drugs to the value of music therapy and dance therapy.

More information
20 Credits
optional
Coursework

Please note that our modules are subject to change - we review the content of our courses regularly, making changes where necessary to improve your experience and graduate prospects.

Side-on portrait of a young student with purple bokeh lights in the background

Campus Tours

Campus Tours are a great way to explore our campuses, facilities and halls of residence. We’ll be running the tours in two-hour timeslots, giving you the best possible experience while adhering to social distancing guidelines.

Book your Campus TourBook your Campus Tour

Virtual Open Day

Delve deeper into the course with our Virtual Open Day, packed with subject and course information to help you make your choice, including tours of facilities, 360° views of award-winning accommodation plus advice and insight from students and academics.

Explore our Virtual Open DayExplore our Virtual Open Day

How you will learn

You will learn through a compelling combination of: 

We offer a high level of support to students, including a personal tutor system to help steer your academic and professional development throughout your studies.  

How you are assessed

You are assessed via a wide range of methods including:

Who you'll meet

Our teaching team for the BSc (Hons) Forensic and Criminal Psychology is made up of engaging, passionate and inspiring subject experts. They include:

Personal academic tutoring

Your personal academic tutor will work with you to help you get the most out of your time at university. Having someone to talk to about your academic progress, your university experience and your professional aspirations is hugely valuable. We want you to feel challenged in your studies, stretched but confident to achieve your academic and professional goals.

Find out more about personal academic tutoring

Who will teach you

karin spenser

Dr Karin Spenser
Programme leader

Karin Spenser is a Lecturer in Criminal Psychology and has both academic and professional experience in forensic psychology. From an academic perspective, her focus is on quantitative research methods, the paradigms of psychology, working with offenders, and mentally disordered offenders.

View full staff profileView full staff profile

Entry requirements

September 2021 typical entry requirements

RequirementWhat we're looking for
UCAS points72
Specific requirements at A-level

No specific subject requirements

Specific requirements at GCSE

GCSE Maths and English are preferred, however if you don't have these qualifications you will be able to undertake Maths and English at Level 2 as part of your course of study.

IELTS6.0 (with 5.5 in each skills area)
Interview / AuditionN/A
PortfolioN/A

Alternative entry qualifications:

We usually consider an A-level in General Studies as a supplementary qualification. A good application/performance will be taken into account if you do not meet the criteria/offer conditions.

Our entry requirements for this course should be read together with the University's general entry requirements, which details subjects we accept, alternative qualifications and what we're looking for at Derby.

Fees and funding

2020/21 Fees

 Full-timePart-time
UK/EU

£9,250 per year

N/A

International

£14,045 per year

N/A

Further information about our fees and support you may be entitled to.

Additional costs and optional extras

How to apply

UK/EU students

Full-time students applying to start in September should apply for this course through UCAS or you can apply directly to the University for an undergraduate course if you’re not applying to any other UK university in the same year.

Apply through UCASApply directly to the University

Guidance for EU students post-Brexit

International students

Full-time students applying to start in September should apply for this course through UCAS or you can apply directly to the University for an undergraduate course if you’re not applying to any other UK university in the same year.

Apply through UCASApply directly to the University

Guidance for international applicants applying for an undergraduate degree

Careers

The skills and tools you gain on the BSc (Hons) Forensic and Criminal Psychology are valuable for a wide range of careers, including the probation service, the prison service, youth justice and youth offending teams.

You could also consider roles in research and policy-making within the criminal justice system or you could pursue a career in teaching and academia.

Our Careers and Employment Service will provide you with support from day one of your course to ensure you leave Derby as a ‘work-ready’ graduate – industry aware, motivated and enterprising. Throughout your studies, you’ll also benefit from working with your personal academic tutor to reflect on your learning and develop your career ambitions.

The support continues once you’ve completed your course too: you are entitled to further help and guidance from the Careers and Employment Service for up to three years after leaving the University.  

Further study

You can go on to postgraduate study at Derby, with MSc qualifications in subjects such as Forensic and Criminal Psychology, Criminal Investigation, and Criminal Justice and Criminology.

These expand your knowledge into specialist areas and accelerate your progress to more senior and leadership roles. Some of our students also use their experiences on the degree as a springboard into academic research.

As a graduate of the University of Derby, you may benefit from an alumni discount on your postgraduate course fees if you continue to study with us.

Find out more about our alumni discount. 

Jess Mutti

I've always had an interest in Criminal Psychology as I studied my undergraduate degree in Criminology. I ultimately want to be a clinical psychologist working with offenders, and I feel that with this degree I can achieve that dream.

Jessica Mutti
MSc Forensic and Criminal Psychology

Contact us

   
EnquiryEmailPhone

If you need any more information from us, eg on courses, accommodation, applying, car parking, fees or funding, please contact us and we will do everything we can to help you.

Contact us Contact us

Additional information about your studies

Teaching hours

Like most universities, we operate extended teaching hours at the University of Derby, so contact time with your lecturers and tutors could be anytime between 9am and 9pm. Your timetable will usually be available on the website 24 hours after enrolment on to your course.

Additional costs and optional extras

We’re committed to providing you with an outstanding learning experience. Our expert teaching, excellent facilities and great employability prepare you for your future career. As part of our commitment to you we aim to keep any additional study costs to a minimum. However, there are occasions where students may incur some additional costs.

The information below is correct for entry in the academic year September 2020 - August 2021 only. Entry for future academic years may be subject to change.

Included in your fees

Please note: Our courses are refreshed and updated on a regular basis. If you are thinking about transferring onto this course (into the second year for example), you should contact the programme leader for the relevant course information as modules may vary from those shown on this page.

Discover Uni

You might also like