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Course details

Study options

Full-time: 3 years, Part-time: 6 years

UK/EU fee

£9,250 per year* (2020/21)

International fee

£14,045 per year (2020/21)

UCAS points

112* (September 2020 entry)

UCAS code

Y002

Course level

Undergraduate

Qualification

Joint Honours

Start date

September

Location

One Friar Gate Square, Derby Campus

What is Joint Honours?

A Joint Honours degree gives you the opportunity to study two subjects as one degree. This type of degree will broaden your skill set and enhance your career prospects.

You can combine any two subjects as long as they’re in different zones, find out what you can combine this subject with.

Course description

Studying Law at Derby offers you an exciting combination of high quality teaching, specialist facilities and real-world learning opportunities.

Law (Joint Honours) is not a qualifying law degree and therefore does not exempt you from the academic stage of legal training. After successful completion of stage one and dependant on your module choices in your first year, it may be possible to transfer onto the second year of the LLB Law which is a qualifying degree. 

This intellectually stimulating and challenging programme allows you to combine your study of Law with another subject, broadening your perspectives and career prospects.

Choice and flexibility

You’ll discover a wide range of exciting and interesting options to choose from. You can select modules which match your personal interests, reflect your career aspirations or complement the other Joint Honours subject you are studying.

First-rate facilities

We offer some of the country’s most impressive facilities for the study of Law. Described as “exceptional” by Skills for Justice and including brand new crown, magistrates and family courts, they replicate environments encountered in real-life legal situations.

Expertise and inspiration

We place a strong emphasis on the development of academic, intellectual and personal skills throughout your studies. Our approachable and friendly lecturers are dedicated to supporting students of all ages from a wide variety of backgrounds. Our teaching is enriched by research covering some of the most pressing legal issues confronting society today, from slavery to digital privacy.

Networked into the profession

We work in close partnership with the legal profession locally and nationally, which gives you vital insights into practice and helps you develop your skills, networks and employability. 

An outstanding learning experience

You’ll discover a rich programme of extra-curricular events, including study trips and the chance to take part in mooting competitions. A highlight of our calendar is the prestigious black tie law dinner where you can network with members of the local judiciary and legal profession. You can also join our active student Law Society which runs educational, social and careers advice events.

Bright career prospects

We pride ourselves on producing able and employable graduates. Throughout your course, you will be encouraged to plan for your future career. You will have the chance to take part in careers events, CV clinics and mock interviews to help realise your potential. We also have a specialist careers advisor dedicated to Law students.

A chance to study abroad

We have strong links with universities in France, Italy and the Czech Republic. Through the Go Places, Go Further programme, you could even spend part of your studies studying abroad - an excellent way to improve your academic experience and enhance your job prospects while enjoying a different culture.

Popular Joint Honours combinations

Joint Honours gives you the flexibility to cover two subjects in one degree. Popular combinations with Law include:

You can also consider studying Law as a single honours subject with our LLB (Hons) and LLB (Hons) with Criminology.

What you will study

Example modules are shown below, the modules available as a Joint Honours student will be dependent on the subject that you combine with. In your first year, modules will be defined for you, and will be dependent on your subject combination to ensure you have the best fit. In your second and third years, module availability and the number of modules you are required to take will depend on whether you choose this subject as a major, joint or minor.

Year 1Year 1Year 2Year 2Year 3Year 3

Code: 4LA507

Tortious Liability and Negligence

This module explores the concept of obligations imposed by law. To that end, it introduces the student to notions of tortious liability and uses an in-depth examination of the tort of negligence. Where appropriate, it links with the notion of contractual obligations in order to demonstrate the interaction between certain contractual obligations and those of a tortious nature. It is assessed by a combination of coursework and performance in tutorials.
20 Credits
optional
Coursework

Code: 4LA500

Administrative Law and Human Rights

Administrative Law and Human Rights focuses on the process and rationale for judicial review of bodies exercising public functions. It takes the students through each stage of the process, using practical examples and case law to illuminate the key methods and principles for the control of public power by the courts.

It is essentially a practice-focused module that will equip the students through teaching and assessed practice to undertake a time-constrained simulation of the first stage of judicial review as their summative assessment. In the teaching and learning students engage with as part of the module, particular emphasis is placed on the UK human rights framework and the ongoing dialogue between the executive and the courts in relation to rights in public law. Employability will be enhanced for students seeking to work in legal professional practice connected to administrative and human rights law, as well as for students seeking to work in the public sector more broadly.

More information
20 Credits
optional
Exam

Code: 4LA501

Constitutional Law and Civil Liberties

This module explores the legal and constitutional foundations of public power in England. More than any other area of law it has to draw on the rich historical, political and social traditions that veil the distinct absence of full mechanisms of legal accountability of central government and law-making institutions.

The traditional underlying principles of the British constitution will be explored and examined in their historical context and their relevance in light of modern constitutional arrangements explored. The effect of external influences such as membership of the European Union, the European Convention on Human Rights and international law obligations will also be addressed. Finally, the efficiency of the constitution in protecting civil liberties will be explored. In addition, students, through regular assessed tutorial essays, will be taught the vital skill of academic legal writing.

More information
20 Credits
optional
Coursework

Code: 4LA504

Legal Context, Skills and Ethics

The study of Law at LLB Honours level needs to be placed into its theoretical, societal, historical and administrative context. The issues of professional practice – in particular those relating to professional ethics – require focused examination.

This module provides the opportunity for student to do this. An undergraduate student of Law also needs to acquire appropriate skills. As well as skills which relate to the study and method of Law, students require reinforcement and development of their communication, research, information technology and basic legal research skills together with development of general critical abilities. 

This module seeks to provide a structured route, allowing students to achieve these objectives and demonstrate their skills development in a tangible way and at a level that may not always be required through the skills development that takes places within substantive modules. It acts as a foundation for further study and assists employability by giving the student transferable skills to use while undertaking the award and also in further vocational stages and research stages of education.

An international context is delivered by consideration of comparative legal systems and the European influence on the UK jurisdiction. The study of ethics is introduced and a specific workshop is delivered in which key areas are highlighted.

More information
20 Credits
optional
Practical
Coursework

Code: 4LA506

Specific Torts and Remedies

This module explores further the concept of obligations imposed by Law. It builds upon the module Tortious Liability and Negligence (a prerequisite for this module) by extending students’ studies to encompass the major areas of tort other than negligence. It is assessed by way of a written examination.
20 Credits
optional
Exam

Code: 5LA507

Tortious Liability and Negligence

This module explores the concept of obligations imposed by law. To that end, it introduces the student to notions of tortious liability and uses an in-depth examination of the tort of negligence. Where appropriate, it links with the notion of contractual obligations in order to demonstrate the interaction between certain contractual obligations and those of a tortious nature. It is assessed by a combination of coursework and performance in tutorials.
20 Credits
optional
Coursework

Code: 5LA500

Administrative Law and Human Rights

This module focuses on the process and rationale for judicial review of bodies exercising public functions. It takes the students through each stage of the process, using practical examples and case law to illuminate the key methods and principles for the control of public power by the courts. It is essentially a practice-focused module that will equip the students through teaching and assessed practice to undertake a time-constrained simulation of the first stage of judicial review as their summative assessment.

In the teaching and learning students engage with as part of the module, particular emphasis is placed on the UK human rights framework and the ongoing dialogue between the executive and the courts in relation to rights in public law. Employability will be enhanced for students seeking to work in legal professional practice connected to administrative and human rights law, as well as for students seeking to work in the public sector more broadly.

More information
20 Credits
optional
Exam

Code: 5LA502

Contract Law Theory and Practice

This module examines the formation of voluntary legal relationships. It considers how contracts are entered into, agreed, evidenced, vitiated (impaired) and discharged. It considers the theoretical and normative nature of contractual obligations in the context of the common law and statute. Terms, conditions and warranties are considered, as is their relationship with public policy, such as consumer protection legislation.

This module will be taught through a combination of media: lectures, tutorials, reflective questions and group work. Lectures will be used to introduce each subject and explore difficult topics in depth. 

Tutorials provide an opportunity for students to analyse practical questions related to the subject material, thus providing a real link between the academic subject material and legal practice. Reflective questions on Blackboard will reinforce the independent self-study that is undertaken. Students will be expected to work in groups for Contract Law in Practice, in the style of a law firm providing advice to a client.

An opportunity for all students to complete a formative mock-examination will be provided in the first semester of the module.

More information
20 Credits
optional
Exam
Coursework

Code: 5LA505

Commercial and Consumer Law

The module examines the law relating to the sale and supply of goods and services, agency, product safety, insurance and consumer credit. In this capacity it builds on general principles of contract law by focusing specifically on contracts of sale and supply of goods and services as well as addressing the rights and protection afforded to consumers.

It equips students for further study and gives a broad understanding of both substantive and procedural requirements. The assessment strategy is in place in order to enable students to gain academic understanding and how such law works in practice in the commercial sectors. It provides a foundation to further vocational study with ILEX (Institute of Legal Executives), LPC (Legal Practice Course) or BPTC (Bar Professional Training Course) or postgraduate courses. 

Students will gain employability skills and benefit from knowledge of the workings of the commercial and consumer processes in contemporary legal society. There is an international dimension in that the module considers international consumer protection issues and their applicability in the UK jurisdiction.

More information
20 Credits
optional
Exam
Practical
Coursework

Code: 5LA506

Specific Torts and Remedies

This module explores further the concept of obligations imposed by Law. It builds upon the module Tortious Liability and Negligence (a prerequisite for this module) by extending students’ studies to encompass the major areas of tort other than negligence. It is assessed by way of a written examination.
20 Credits
optional
Exam

Code: 5LA508

Company Law

This module explores the nature of the company as a business medium. Students will examine how the law regulates the company, evaluating the significance of internal procedures, documentary records and financial aspects.

Further, the roles of directors, shareholders, the company secretary and auditors are explored. Analysis of reconstructions, mergers and acquisitions is undertaken as well as the implications and options available on insolvency. Module content includes topics applicable for the relevant ILEX (Institute of Legal Executives) module and serves to prepare students wishing to undertake the ILEX assessments for this area of study. Students are assessed by coursework and written examination.

More information
20 Credits
optional
Exam
Coursework

Code: 5LA509

Principles of Sentencing

The task of how courts in England and Wales deal with those convicted of criminal offences comes at a crucial stage in the Criminal Justice process. This module aims to explore and critically examine the legal and policy frameworks within which the sentencing of offenders takes place. Particular attention will focus on the aims and principles of punishment.

The module offers students the opportunity to explore the concept of offence seriousness as well as other practical issues most likely to be taken into account by the courts. Safeguards and challenges to this process will also be a focal point throughout the module.

The sentencing structure of England and Wales will also be compared with that set out in the Australian Criminal Code. It goes without saying that the sentencing of offenders engages the State’s obligations under Art 6 of the ECHR (European Convention on Human Rights).

More information
20 Credits
optional
Coursework

Code: 5LA510

Criminal Law Principles and Application

Criminal law is a fascinating and ever-changing area of law. This module aims to provide students with an understanding of the essential elements of criminal liability which include the guilty act, the required mental state and the proof of causation, along with a consideration of any relevant defences, and the relationship between these.

The module aims to explore these concepts in relation to the application of these to a variety of both fatal offences and non-fatal offences. The module also considers mechanisms of liability which deal with discrete areas of criminal liability and the application of these concepts in practice.

More information
20 Credits
optional
Exam
Coursework

Code: 5LA511

Criminal Practice and Property Offences

Criminal Practice and Property Offences enables students to gain an understanding of how criminal liability arises in relation to a range of specific offences relating to property and to understand how the criminal law operates to protect property rights and impose liability. The module will also consider the liability of parties for their actions prior to the completion of a criminal act in relation to a range of offences. It equips students for further study and gives an understanding of general procedural requirements.

The assessment strategy is in place in order to enable students to gain academic understanding of the substantive law and how such law ‘works in practice’. The module has links with professional accreditation bodies such as ILEX (Institute of Legal Executives). It provides a foundation to further vocational study with ILEX, LPC (Legal Practice Course) or BPTC (Bar Professional Training Course). Students will gain employability skills and benefit from knowledge of the general workings of the criminal litigation process, coupled with property offences, in contemporary legal society. There is an international dimension in that the module considers the possibility of foreign nationals absconding in the Bail process.

More information
20 Credits
optional
Practical
Coursework

Code: 5LA512

Employment Law

This module explores the key principles and policies which underpin employment law with a particular emphasis on the regulation of the employment relationship in the workplace. Assessment is by way of an essay and an individual written assignment based around a role-play workshop.
20 Credits
optional
Coursework

Code: 5LA513

Environmental Law

This module explores the concept of obligations, imposed by law, which recognise and seek to preserve the environment as a precious heritage. To that end, it introduces the student to the application of the law and proactive risk analysis techniques employed to prevent pollution of the environment. The need to maintain a sustainable balance between environmental protection and socio-economic development is fundamental to preserving natural resources and the influence of environmental law will be discussed. The module will be assessed by coursework.
20 Credits
optional
Coursework

Code: 5LA514

European Union Law

The role of law in ensuring that the objectives of the European Union are achieved is paramount. The aim of this module is to explore how European Union law has emerged as a new legal order which operates at a European level but which is now intertwined with the English legal system.

It, therefore, examines the various sources of European Union law, its implementation and enforcement at both European and national levels and the judicial controls which exist to fetter the exercise of power by the European Union. It will examine, as a precursor to the subsequent module of European Union Trade Law and its International Context, the notion of citizenship of the European Union and the development of fundamental and human rights.

More information
20 Credits
optional
Exam
Coursework

Code: 5LA515

European Union Trade Law

The purpose of this module is to examine the principal elements of the trade law of the European Union. It covers, in detail, the law relating to the free movement of goods, and the removal of fiscal, physical and technical barriers to trade. Also included is an examination of the free movement of persons, of services and the right of establishment.
20 Credits
optional
Exam

Code: 5LA516

Family Law and Practice

This module will enable students to appreciate the main areas of law and practice which need to be addressed on the breakdown of relationships. Students will examine the divorce process with particular reference to ancillary relief and children issues. They will also consider the impact of law on unmarried couples and same-sex partners. The module will give students a practical grounding in the practice and procedure of the divorce process, including drafting a petition, the strategic considerations involved in advising and decision making, and advocacy.
20 Credits
optional
Exam
Practical

Code: 5LA517

International Human Rights Law

International Human Rights Law is arguably one of the most dynamic, far reaching and successful areas of international law. Growing international concern about human rights abuses can be seen to stem from the anti-slavery movement in the early 19th century through increased protection for the victims of war to modern day concerns arising from the aftermath of both world wars. This being said, certain areas of human rights protection remain controversial especially when behaviours are culturally entrenched.

This module addresses the development of human rights protection through the consideration of a variety of international instruments and assessing their impact and efficacy in eradicating abuses. Through a series of case studies students will address areas of modern concern and assess the enforcement of human rights norms at both regional and international level.

More information
20 Credits
optional
Coursework

Code: 5LA518

Public International Law

Classically, in the writings of such as Vattel in the 18th century, the state is the main subject of international law. The contemporary state is threatened in various directions: ethnic conflict, international financial speculation, the drugs trade, terrorism, to name a few. The question arises, therefore, is the classical conception on international law still valid given modern global realities.

To this end, the module explores and challenges the basic concepts of public international law – the state, treaty as a source of public international law, the role of custom, territorial and jurisdictional sovereignty, diplomatic law, non-intervention and a state's right to self-defence, against the practical concepts under which these have to now be applied.

More information
20 Credits
optional
Coursework

Code: 6LA505

Commercial and Consumer Law

The module examines the law relating to the sale and supply of goods and services, agency, product safety, insurance and consumer credit. In this capacity it builds on general principles of contract law by focusing specifically on contracts of sale and supply of goods and services as well as addressing the rights and protection afforded to consumers.

It equips students for further study and gives a broad understanding of both substantive and procedural requirements. The assessment strategy is in place in order to enable students to gain academic understanding and how such law works in practice in the commercial sectors. It provides a foundation to further vocational study with ILEX (Institute of Legal Executives), LPC (Legal Practice Course) or BPTC (Bar Professional Training Course) or postgraduate courses. 

Students will gain employability skills and benefit from knowledge of the workings of the commercial and consumer processes in contemporary legal society. There is an international dimension in that the module considers international consumer protection issues and their applicability in the UK jurisdiction.

More information
20 Credits
optional
Exam
Practical
Coursework

Code: 6LA508

Company Law

This module explores the nature of the company as a business medium. Students will examine how the law regulates the company, evaluating the significance of internal procedures, documentary records and financial aspects.

Further, the roles of directors, shareholders, the company secretary and auditors are explored. Analysis of reconstructions, mergers and acquisitions is undertaken as well as the implications and options available on insolvency. Module content includes topics applicable for the relevant ILEX (Institute of Legal Executives) module and serves to prepare students wishing to undertake the ILEX assessments for this area of study. Students are assessed by coursework and written examination.

More information
20 Credits
optional
Exam
Coursework

Code: 6LA509

Principles of Sentencing

The task of how courts in England and Wales deal with those convicted of criminal offences comes at a crucial stage in the Criminal Justice process. This module aims to explore and critically examine the legal and policy frameworks within which the sentencing of offenders takes place. Particular attention will focus on the aims and principles of punishment.

The module offers students the opportunity to explore the concept of offence seriousness as well as other practical issues most likely to be taken into account by the courts. Safeguards and challenges to this process will also be a focal point throughout the module.

The sentencing structure of England and Wales will also be compared with that set out in the Australian Criminal Code. It goes without saying that the sentencing of offenders engages the State’s obligations under Art 6 of the ECHR (European Convention on Human Rights).

More information
20 Credits
optional
Coursework

Code: 6LA510

Criminal Law Principles and Application

Criminal law is a fascinating and ever-changing area of law. This module aims to provide students with an understanding of the essential elements of criminal liability which include the guilty act, the required mental state and the proof of causation, along with a consideration of any relevant defences, and the relationship between these.

The module aims to explore these concepts in relation to the application of these to a variety of both fatal offences and non-fatal offences. The module also considers mechanisms of liability which deal with discrete areas of criminal liability and the application of these concepts in practice.

More information
20 Credits
optional
Exam
Coursework

Code: 6LA511

Criminal Practice and Property Offences

Criminal Practice and Property Offences enables students to gain an understanding of how criminal liability arises in relation to a range of specific offences relating to property and to understand how the criminal law operates to protect property rights and impose liability. The module will also consider the liability of parties for their actions prior to the completion of a criminal act in relation to a range of offences. It equips students for further study and gives an understanding of general procedural requirements.

The assessment strategy is in place in order to enable students to gain academic understanding of the substantive law and how such law ‘works in practice’. The module has links with professional accreditation bodies such as ILEX (Institute of Legal Executives). It provides a foundation to further vocational study with ILEX, LPC (Legal Practice Course) or BPTC (Bar Professional Training Course). Students will gain employability skills and benefit from knowledge of the general workings of the criminal litigation process, coupled with property offences, in contemporary legal society. There is an international dimension in that the module considers the possibility of foreign nationals absconding in the Bail process.

More information
20 Credits
optional
Practical
Coursework

Code: 6LA512

Employment Law

This module explores the key principles and policies which underpin employment law with a particular emphasis on the regulation of the employment relationship in the workplace. Assessment is by way of an essay and an individual written assignment based around a role-play workshop.
20 Credits
optional
Coursework

Code: 6LA513

Environmental Law

This module explores the concept of obligations, imposed by law, which recognise and seek to preserve the environment as a precious heritage. To that end, it introduces the student to the application of the law and proactive risk analysis techniques employed to prevent pollution of the environment.

The need to maintain a sustainable balance between environmental protection and socio-economic development is fundamental to preserving natural resources and the influence of environmental law will be discussed. The module will be assessed by coursework.

More information
20 Credits
optional
Coursework

Code: 6LA514

European Union Law

The role of law in ensuring that the objectives of the European Union are achieved is paramount. The aim of this module is to explore how European Union law has emerged as a new legal order which operates at a European level but which is now intertwined with the English legal system.

It, therefore, examines the various sources of European Union law, its implementation and enforcement at both European and national levels and the judicial controls which exist to fetter the exercise of power by the European Union. It will examine, as a precursor to the subsequent module of European Union Trade Law and its International Context, the notion of citizenship of the European Union and the development of fundamental and human rights.

More information
20 Credits
optional
Exam
Coursework

Code: 6LA515

European Union Trade Law

The purpose of this module is to examine the principal elements of the trade law of the European Union. It covers, in detail, the law relating to the free movement of goods, and the removal of fiscal, physical and technical barriers to trade. Also included is an examination of the free movement of persons, of services and the right of establishment.
20 Credits
optional
Exam

Code: 6LA516

Family Law and Practice

This module will enable students to appreciate the main areas of law and practice which need to be addressed on the breakdown of relationships. Students will examine the divorce process with particular reference to ancillary relief and children issues. They will also consider the impact of law on unmarried couples and same-sex partners. The module will give students a practical grounding in the practice and procedure of the divorce process, including drafting a petition, the strategic considerations involved in advising and decision making, and advocacy.
20 Credits
optional
Exam
Practical

Code: 6LA517

International Human Rights Law

International Human Rights Law is arguably one of the most dynamic, far reaching and successful areas of international law. Growing international concern about human rights abuses can be seen to stem from the anti-slavery movement in the early 19th century through increased protection for the victims of war to modern day concerns arising from the aftermath of both world wars. This being said, certain areas of human rights protection remain controversial especially when behaviours are culturally entrenched.

This module addresses the development of human rights protection through the consideration of a variety of international instruments and assessing their impact and efficacy in eradicating abuses. Through a series of case studies students will address areas of modern concern and assess the enforcement of human rights norms at both regional and international level.

More information
20 Credits
optional
Coursework

Code: 6LA518

Public International Law

Classically, in the writings of such as Vattel in the 18th century, the state is the main subject of international law. The contemporary state is threatened in various directions: ethnic conflict, international financial speculation, the drugs trade, terrorism, to name a few.

The question arises, therefore, is the classical conception on international law still valid given modern global realities. To this end, the module explores and challenges the basic concepts of public international law – the state, treaty as a source of public international law, the role of custom, territorial and jurisdictional sovereignty, diplomatic law, non-intervention and a state's right to self-defence, against the practical concepts under which these have to now be applied.

More information
20 Credits
optional
Coursework

Code: 6LA519

Comparative Law

Comparative law now stands at the heart of any meaningful enquiry into law. This is a subject that is seen as strategic in the discipline of law. There is not a single area of law which is not affected by it nowadays.

As such, this module aims to provide the student with a significant opportunity to explore, among other things, the nature of the comparative method, its functions, its significance, the division of the world’s legal systems into families, the idea of law harmonisation, and the comparison of contract, constitutional and family laws from different jurisdictions. The module will enable the student to describe and comment upon particular aspects of current research, or equivalent advanced scholarship in the subject of comparative law. 

The range of issues embraced in the subject includes comprehensive methodological analysis in a number of substantive areas of law. The delivery of the module will connect also to other subjects of legal epistemology, eg legal theory and legal sociology, in that it will not only examine the division of legal families of systems but will also demonstrate the jurisprudential and socio-historical reasons for such a division.

Accordingly, the module takes a multidisciplinary approach. The module enhances the employability of the students:

  • By encouraging students to appreciate and examine domestic law and structures, while allowing them to become familiar with foreign legal material
  • By providing students following the module with the intellectual tools to work beyond the domestic legal system
  • By enhancing as a whole the comparative-analytical proficiency of the student body

The assessment strategy of the module involves a research paper in the form of an essay. Individual essay topics are agreed between the students and the module leader.

More information
20 Credits
optional
Coursework

Code: 6LA521

Evidence

Evidence is a significant area of law which is directly relevant to all court actions and the information introduced during such proceedings. Emphasis is placed on evidence in criminal court proceedings with some comparative consideration of the civil court process and rules of evidence.

The module explores the body of legal rules regulating the roles and input of the judge, jury and witnesses, and the court process. Rules relating to the level of proof and burden of proof required in court actions and the role and rights of the police in obtaining evidence are studied. Specific types of evidence are studied along with issues of their admissibility and their value and weight. It is assessed by coursework and by written examination.

More information
20 Credits
optional
Exam
Coursework

Code: 6LA522

Intellectual Property Law

This module explores the law and procedure relating to the protection of intellectual property and the exploitation of the results of intellectual, scientific, technical, artistic, literary, musical and entrepreneurial endeavour. Its main focus is the law of the UK in its European setting, but appropriate reference is made to the international perspective. The module is assessed by a portfolio of work.
20 Credits
optional
Coursework

Code: 6LA523

Sustainable Development and International Business Law

This module draws together two pertinent strands operative in international relations between states. These are the process of sustainable development and the regulation of international business transactions.

The module will explore and analyse the theory and practice of sustainable development as well as analyse international business transaction as it relates to the sale of goods and the provision of services. In this capacity, the module will link these two strands and will engage students with live and contemporary development problems facing governments and then allow the students to implement functional and realistic business solutions to these problems.

The module places the student at the heart of sustainable international business and fosters problem-solving, creativity, enterprise, critical analysis and innovation for the purpose of direct impact. To bolster this, the module will engage and interact with the Government Department for International Development and, the British Council through guest speakers and projects offered by these institutions. The assessment is by coursework and will require students to analyse a series of case studies and implement a sustainable business transaction.

More information
20 Credits
optional
Practical
Coursework

Code: 6LA525

Medical Law and Ethics

Medical Law and Ethics is a fascinating and rapidly developing field of study and application. It is required to address patients’ rights to appropriately decisive involvement in their healthcare provision and clinical management.

It also raises increasingly challenging issues in relation to the regulation of rapidly emerging potentials in the field of assisted reproduction technologies, organ transplantation and in the light of changing societal attitudes to the care of the terminally ill. Quite literally, it concerns life and death matters and consequently interfaces significantly with ethical and philosophical perspectives which will form an integral part of this course.

More information
20 Credits
optional
Practical
Coursework

Code: 6LA541

International Criminal Law

This module will begin with the general principles of international criminal law, including sources of law, the history of international crimes and the elements that make up an international crime.

The module then moves into international war crimes including genocide, crimes against humanity and torture. Human rights and fundamental freedoms will play a large role throughout this module. The module then moves on to terrorism as an international crime including preparation and joint enterprise, attempt, conspiracy and omissions. The module will also investigate justifications, excuses, mistakes and duress as defences. Immunity will also be covered. Finally, the module will finish with the establishment of international criminal law trials. This final topic will include different jurisdictions, cooperation, appeals and trial systems.

More information
20 Credits
optional
Coursework

Code: 6LA542

Road Traffic Offences

Road Traffic Offences enables students to gain an understanding of how criminal liability arises in relation to a range of specific offences relating to road usage and to understand how the criminal law operates to regulate the use of the road system and the imposition of rights and obligations on road users.

The module will also consider the liability of road users and third parties for their actions in relation to crimes categorised as road traffic offences. It equips students for further study and gives an understanding of general procedural requirements. The assessment strategy is in place in order to enable students to gain academic understanding of the substantive law and how such law ‘works in practice’.

The module has links with professional accreditation bodies such as ILEX (Institute of Legal Executives), The Law Society and the Bar Council. It provides a foundation to further vocational study with ILEX, LPC (Legal Practice Course) or BPTC (Bar Professional Training Course). 

Students will gain employability skills and benefit from knowledge of the general workings of road traffic litigation, coupled with sub-offences, in contemporary legal society. There is an international dimension in that the module considers the possibility of foreign nationals driving in the United Kingdom.

More information
20 Credits
optional
Practical
Coursework

Code: 6LA544

Sports Law

The subject of Sports Law has seen rapid growth as an area of academic inquiry and significant numbers of legal practices now have dedicated departments dealing with sports-related issues (perhaps reflecting the fact that the sports industry now accounts for 3% of world trade). Numerous academic departments have developed Sports Studies courses, including postgraduate LLM (Master of Laws) courses and many lawyers have specialised in this field.

While many might think of it as an exciting area of study with the glamour of premier league football, Olympic athletes, cricketing superstars and so on, for the lawyer it brings contact with a wide range of intellectually stimulating and challenging areas:

  • The complex field of international regulation and the role of Sports Governing Bodies and the European Union
  • Match fixing and corruption in Sport
  • The exploitation and protection of commercial sporting rights
  • Doping in Sport
  • Sports Contracts of Employment and restraint of trade (and the significance of Bosman)
  • Discrimination in sport and equal opportunities
  • The use of force in sport and the overlaps with tort and criminal law where excessive force is used
  • The regulation of sports stadia and the management of crowds
  • Football hooliganism
  • Child protection
More information
20 Credits
optional
Coursework

Code: 6LA546

Licensing Law

Licensing Law is a niche area of law and is an example of an administrative legal process. As well as administrative law, the module will cover related elements of criminal law and human rights law. Study of licensing law will provide students with a practical understanding of a legal process from start to finish, from application to determination, covering the relevant law, procedure, evidence, guidance, policy, case law and human rights.

The module will include the licensing of alcohol and entertainment, sexual entertainment venues and gambling.

Assessment will primarily be by way of examination to test knowledge and understanding but there will also be a practical element of coursework aimed at testing knowledge and application of the subject material. An administrative licensing process inevitably warrants applications to be made to licensing authorities and to the court and students will gain an understanding of Licensing Law in part through completing the necessary applications.

More information
20 Credits
optional
Exam
Practical

Code: 6LA547

Mediation

In the context of Family Law, litigation is often seen, by both the public and lawyers, as the principal means by which disputes are resolved. Court proceedings, however, do not always lead to fair or workable outcomes. Attention has, more recently, been focused on resolving conflicts outside of, or as an adjunct to, formal litigation. This module introduces the student to the principles and practice of mediation in the context of family disputes.
20 Credits
optional
Coursework

Code: 6LA548

Domestic Abuse

Students will explore the definitions of domestic violence (DV) used by the various agencies involved in this area before analysing the nature and prevalence of DV and identifying the victims and perpetrators. The legal and medical responses to victims and perpetrators will also be examined and will be further evaluated by taking a psychological approach to the dynamics of abuse.
20 Credits
optional
Coursework

Code: 6LA551

Clinical Legal Skills

The emphasis of this module is on providing students with clinical legal education, which aligns with the applied and skills orientated approach of the programme. Students are provided with the opportunity to gain experience of legal practice in a live client setting, with the students applying and developing further the knowledge and skills learned throughout their journey on the programme, giving holistic value to the module as part of the programme. Through the link to other modules students will gain a more functional and meaningful understanding of the application of the law through the legal system.

Engagement with this module will develop both professional legal skills and transferrable skills. Furthermore, it will assist with employability.

This module provides the students with the opportunity to participate in the Centre’s provision of free legal and advice assistance to the community of Derby on a range of areas of law, which in itself will expose the students to social justice.

More information
40 Credits
optional
Coursework

Please note that our modules are subject to change - we review the content of our courses regularly, making changes where necessary to improve your experience and graduate prospects.

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Open Days

Register your interest for a future Open Day and we'll be in touch as soon as we are able to welcome you on campus.

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How you will learn

Teaching and learning

You will enjoy a variety of methods of teaching, including formal lectures, problem-solving tutorials, seminar discussion groups, computer-assisted learning, group work and practical activities to develop skills such as interviewing, negotiation and oral presentation.

Assessment

You may be assessed through a mixture of group work, oral presentations, written coursework and examinations, enabling you to develop and demonstrate your legal knowledge and skills effectively.

Who you will meet

George Ellison - Lecturer in Law and the link tutor for Joint Honours students who study law modules. George is a former police officer and Senior Lecturer in Law who specialises in teaching public law, human rights and crime.

Lisa Cherkassky - Senior Lecturer in Law with research interests in medical law, medical ethics, the law surrounding organ transplantation and saviour siblings, and criminal law. Lisa is Chief Editor of The Journal of Medical Law and Ethics.

Cherry Diggle - Lecturer in Land Law with additional research interests in medical law and ethics, including the legal considerations relating to end-of-life decision-making, stem-cell technology and human enhancement.

Christie Eaton - Lecturer in Law and solicitor teaching in areas such as legal skills and ethics as well as EU law.

Rachael Ita - Lecturer in Law who previously practised as a barrister and solicitor in Nigeria. Her research interests centre on international law, administrative law and human rights law.

Sue Jennings - Head of Derby Law School who specialises in teaching employment law and practises as a solicitor in Derby. Sue co-ordinates the hugely popular and successful Annual Skills Triathlon organised by the University of Derby and Derby & District Law Society.

Joel Klaff - Senior Lecturer in Law whose subject areas include contractual obligations, commercial law, international trade, international business and commercial theory. His research interests centre on learning, teaching and assessment within the context of international and personal development.

Tim Marangon - Lecturer in Law specialising in teaching tort law and has a keen interest in medical law.  Indeed, he is currently working on Chapters in a book on Medical Law, to be published by Routledge.

Larry Mead - Senior Lecturer in Law specialising in company law and evidence. Larry has combined his academic career with practice as a criminal law barrister and has published in the areas of company and business law.

Chris Poole - Principal Lecturer in Law. Chris specialises in intellectual property law (covering areas such as copyright, trademarks, patents and confidential information); information technology law (relating to computers, the internet and technology); and contract lawHe has lectured in Germany, the Czech Republic, Israel and Malaysia, as well as the UK.

Personal academic tutoring

Your personal academic tutor will work with you to help you get the most out of your time at university. Having someone to talk to about your academic progress, your university experience and your professional aspirations is hugely valuable. We want you to feel challenged in your studies, stretched but confident to achieve your academic and professional goals.

Find out more about personal academic tutoring

Who will teach you

George Ellison
Programme leader

George is a Senior Lecturer in Law and specialise in teaching public law, human rights, and crime.

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Entry requirements

September 2020 typical entry requirements

RequirementWhat we're looking for
UCAS points112* (up to 16 from AS-levels)
Specific requirements at A-level

No specific subject requirements

Specific requirements at GCSEGCSE Maths and English Grade C/Grade 4 (or above) or equivalent qualification
Interview / AuditionN/A
PortfolioN/A

Alternative entry qualifications:

For joint honours degree entry you will need to choose two subjects. The entry criteria here is for this subject only. Your offer will be based on the higher entry criteria from the two subjects you choose to do. A good application/performance will be taken into account if you do not meet the criteria/offer conditions.

*The UCAS Points required for entry will depend on the subjects you choose to combine. The subject with the higher entry requirements will determine your offer.

Our entry requirements for this course should be read together with the University's general entry requirements, which details subjects we accept, alternative qualifications and what we're looking for at Derby.

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Academic Achievement Scholarship

We’re offering eligible students a £1,000 scholarship to celebrate your hard work and success.

Learn more about the Academic Achievement ScholarshipLearn more about the Academic Achievement Scholarship

Fees and funding

2020/21 Fees

 Full-timePart-time
UK/EU

£9,250 per year*

£1,155 per module*

International

£14,045 per year

N/A

* The fees stated above are for the 2019/20 academic year; fees for 2020/21 have not yet been confirmed by the UK government. We will update this information as soon as it is available.

Further information about our fees and support you may be entitled to.

Additional costs and optional extras

How to apply

UK/EU students

Full-time students applying to start in September should apply for this course through UCAS or you can apply directly to the University for an undergraduate course if you’re not applying to any other UK university in the same year.

Part-time students should apply directly to the University.

Apply through UCASApply directly to the University

Guidance for EU students post-Brexit

International students

Full-time students applying to start in September should apply for this course through UCAS or you can apply directly to the University for an undergraduate course if you’re not applying to any other UK university in the same year.

Apply through UCASApply directly to the University

Guidance for international applicants applying for an undergraduate degree

Careers

Studying Law as a Joint Honours subject represents a unique opportunity to develop an impressive combination of skills, making you an attractive prospect for future employers. Whilst a Joint Honours Law degree does not fully qualify you to proceed to train as a barrister or solicitor, it does provide a stepping stone to many other career areas requiring legal knowledge. These include for example careers in local government, criminal justice agencies, the Crown Prosecution Service, and charitable and voluntary sector organisations.

Your degree can also provide a pathway to further postgraduate study. If you wish to continue to develop your legal knowledge at masters level, we offer an exciting and successful portfolio of LLMs.

As a graduate of the University of Derby, you may benefit from an alumni discount on your postgraduate course fees if you continue to study with us. Further information can be found here.

Contact us

If you need any more information from us, eg on courses, accommodation, applying, car parking, fees or funding, please contact us and we will do everything we can to help you.

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Additional information about your studies

You will typically study your two subjects equally at stage one, before choosing whether you want to major in one subject at stages two and three.

Download programme specification

Teaching hours

Like most universities, we operate extended teaching hours at the University of Derby, so contact time with your lecturers and tutors could be anytime between 9am and 9pm. Your timetable will usually be available on the website 24 hours after enrolment on to your course.

Additional costs and optional extras

We’re committed to providing you with an outstanding learning experience. Our expert teaching, excellent facilities and great employability prepare you for your future career. As part of our commitment to you we aim to keep any additional study costs to a minimum. However, there are occasions where students may incur some additional costs.

Included in your fees

Mandatory costs not included in your fees

Optional costs not included in your fees

Please note: Our courses are refreshed and updated on a regular basis. If you are thinking about transferring onto this course (into the second year for example), you should contact the programme leader for the relevant course information as modules may vary from those shown on this page.

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Law can be combined with:

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For this combination Discover Uni does not have enough data to publish a widget. It is important to note that this is not a reflection on the quality of the course.

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