New course for the 21/22 academic year

Course details

Study options

Full-time: 3 years, Part-time: 6 years

UCAS points

72 (September 2021 entry)

UCAS code

F75F

Course level

Undergraduate

Qualification

BSc (Hons)

Start date

September

Location

Kedleston Road, Derby Campus

Course description

Pressure is increasing on industry and governments around the world to respond to the harmful outcomes of human activity, and rapidly develop innovative approaches to ensure the sustainable future of the environment. This course is designed to meet the growing demand for graduates skilled in shaping innovative solutions that have a positive impact on environmental and sustainability issues.

Environmental Sustainability at Derby

The impact of climate change and loss of biodiversity is disrupting our ecosystems, with experts predicting that we have just a few decades remaining before we pass the 1.5°C limit that could accelerate lasting harm to biodiversity, the economy and people, especially the poorest and most vulnerable communities. We know that change has to happen - this course prepares you to step up to the world’s most pressing environmental challenges. 

On this course, you will explore major environmental threats including:

Whilst there are core study components, this is a flexible course that gives you the opportunity to focus on a specialist route, or combine topics for a broader view of environmental sustainability. In addition, the ‘Student Initiated Module’ in your final year allows you to take the lead and build a module based on your interests, strengths, and career ambitions. In your final year, you will have the option of completing an Independent Study (dissertation) or an Industrial Project, where you can work in industry on a live brief to help solve a real problem – this could lead to employment upon graduation.

This is a research-led degree, which means you'll be taught by expert staff who are conducting influential studies across a breadth of topics - examples of their current research includes sustainable cities, urban green spaces, wildlife and ecosystem conservation and coastal change in Ghana. You'll also benefit from guest lectures by world-class researchers. As part of the course, you’ll conduct your own research and have the opportunity to contribute to the cutting-edge research projects underway at the University.

The course provides the opportunity to study with a placement year to help you translate theory into practice and enhance your employability. 

Desert landscape with 'Any other time' showing in white text,

View Spark Change - Study Environmental Sustainability at Derby video transcript

Inter-disciplinary learning

The challenges facing today’s world are complex and won’t be solved through the efforts of a single subject, so the content of this course is inter-disciplinary, connecting you with expertise from a range of subjects to give you a balanced understanding of the factors involved and the scale of today’s environmental fragility. Studying this way means that upon graduating, you will have a vast set of skills to impress future employers and contribute to global sustainability. These include strong investigative and innovative thinking, problem-solving and a solutions-focused approach, commercial and sustainable business awareness, data collection and analysis, critical thinking, and project management, to name but a few.

Smouldering trees and ground after forest fire, empty land

Our vision 

Our vision is to address local, national and global goals for sustainable development, environmental understanding and clean growth, through an applied and inter-disciplinary approach. We’re making progress on our ambitions through our  (ESRC), where our teaching teams carry out important research to inspire and inform change. There are three themes within the Centre:

Who is this course for?

This course is for those who are passionate about securing the long-term sustainability of life on Earth. Whether you are interested in the development of clean energy, the sustainable management of businesses, the protection of the natural world, the impacts of climate change or the management of ecosystem services, this degree has the breadth to allow you to develop your career in the development of a sustainable future for the planet.

Glacier on the sea front

Demand for new thinking

As the harsh reality of the impacts of climate change and the loss of biodiversity begin to resonate, the need for innovation, bold ideas, and fresh thinking is growing in demand from countries all over the world. Greater scrutiny is also being placed on thousands of companies worldwide to reduce their environmental impacts and adopt new sustainable strategies.

To meet this rising demand and ensure you graduate with skills that can be applied in the UK and globally, the content of the course is designed to support a range of key initiatives from all over the world. These include international agreements such as the ‘United Nations Sustainable Development Goals’, the ‘United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change’, and the ‘Convention on Biological Diversity’. On a national level, the content of the course addresses the goals set by the ‘25-year Environment Plan’, ‘Industrial Strategy’, the ‘Bioenergy Strategy’, the ‘Life Sciences Industrial Strategy’ report and the ‘Landscapes Review’.

A young child walking through a waste plant

Expert teaching

As a student at the University of Derby you'll be working with lecturers and tutors who have a wealth of knowledge and experience, and are carrying out research designed to offer fresh perspectives on significant issues. Their wide-ranging work includes:

You’ll benefit from this research as your lecturers bring the latest thinking to your studies, and in some cases you will have opportunities to get involved in research projects yourself.

an iceberg

Environmental Sustainability Research Centre (ESRC)

Specialising in securing clean environments, nature recovery, and resilience to natural hazards, we work collaboratively to safeguard our planet for future generations.

Learn more about our research Learn more about our research

Facilities and Fieldwork

Today’s problems can only be solved through the application of cutting-edge technology and software. You’ll have access to industry-standard specialist equipment and software including drone technology, field spectrometers, Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM), and Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR). You’ll also work in modern laboratories.

You’ll also have access to Cuckoos Tor, a site on the edge of the Peak District National Park and owned by the University of Derby that is dedicated to long-term research and ecological experiments. Current projects include restoration ecology, natural flood risk management, community engagement with biodiversity, and sustainable land management - and you’ll be able to get involved.

Our fieldwork programme will include local and residential trips where you will be able to explore a range of environments, natural systems, and witness sustainability in action.

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What you will study

Foundation YearFoundation YearYear 1 Year 1 Year 2 Year 2 Optional Placement YearOptional Placement YearYear 3Year 3

Code: 3BY500

Organisms and their Environments

This module is an introduction to organisms and their environments. This module develops a basic understanding of ecology, biodiversity and environmental sustainability, through the study of interactions between organisms in natural environments and those modified by man. This module outlines the biological, chemical and physical aspects of the biosphere; the cycling of biologically important chemical elements at different scales; the flow of energy through food chains; introduces the concepts of food webs, ecosystems, communities, and biomes.

This module will be taught through a series of interlinked lectures, tutorials, practicals and field trips, and guided independent self-study. Indicative content includes ecological concepts such as: biotic and abiotic environments; ecological niche; food chains and food webs; energy and nutrient flow; nutrient cycling; ecological succession; ecosystems, communities and biomes; biodiversity and biodiversity loss; food and farming; climate change; environmental sustainability.

More information
20 Credits
core
Coursework

Code: 3BY503

Introduction to Environmental Science

This is an interdisciplinary module that introduces learners to the study of a broad range of environmental sciences. It is highly practical and underpinned by both field and theoretical investigations; this will normally include a residential field course. Learners will apply a range of appropriate techniques to explore features of the environment, collect appropriate data and undertake fundamental analysis of the data, building confidence in quantitative approaches and providing a baseline for future development in this area.

The indicative module content will consist of:

  • Introduction to landscapes and landscape features
  • Environmental processes Environmental change over temporal and spatial scales
  • Habitat types and the factors that control them. Methods of collecting environmental data including chemical (e.g. O2 concentration, pH), physical (e.g. river flow characteristics), and biological (e.g. sampling techniques for a range of species)
  • Design of environmental assessments
More information
20 Credits
core
Exam
Coursework

Code: 3EV501

Academic and Practical Skills

This module aims to develop the study skills essential for study at university and facilitate the transition into Higher Education. The module will help student understand university systems and processes, the study skills they require to succeed and the role they have in their own learning.

The module will be taught through a series of lectures, tutorials, and workshop sessions. The module will cover three broad themes linked to individual awareness / personal development, digital literacy and study skills. Topics will be delivered by a range of academic and specialist support staff. Indicative content includes: learning styles, student wellbeing, employability, scientific writing, oral communication, teamwork, note-taking, exam preparedness, information location and retrieval and plagiarism and referencing.

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20 Credits
core
Coursework

Code: 3GL500

Foundations in Geoscience

This module offers a place-based introduction to the field of Geoscience. Students will gain a multidisciplinary understanding of geography and geology and how these subjects can be applied to understand real-world issues at the local scale. Students will use Derby, its waterways and its environs as a focus to learn about how geology and geography contribute to our appreciation, understanding and management of local environments.

The module will be taught through a series of lectures, practical classes and field experiences in the Derby area. Indicative content areas include: climate, hydrology, geomorphology, geology, hazard management, urban development, local history.

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20 Credits
core
Coursework

Code: 2MO500

English

This is a level 2 module. The module is oriented towards providing students with sufficient English skills to enable them to engage confidently with level 4 modules.
20 Credits
optional
Coursework

Code: 2MO501

Mathematics

The course is equivalent to GCSE Maths and covers statistics and probability, number work, geometry, and algebra and graphs.
20 Credits
optional
Exam
Coursework

Code: 3FO503

Principles of Chemistry

This module aims to gives students an overview of some of the basic chemical principles that form the foundations of chemistry. Students will learn about the fundamental building blocks of chemistry, exploring the states of matter, its structure and organisation. Students will gain an understanding of the chemical principles of interactions and reactions at the atomic level. Students will then explore fundamental chemistry which underpins applied fields such as forensic science and biology.

The module will be taught through a mixture of lectures, tutorials and practical sessions, employing a range of active learning approaches. Lectures will introduce students to fundamental theories, while problem-based learning in tutorials will be used to consolidate students' understanding of the key concepts. Students will also undertake chemistry-based laboratory experiments to apply the theoretical concepts in a practical context and gain basic laboratory skills. Indicative content will include states of matter, atomic structure, trends in the periodic table, rates of reactions and catalysis in applied biological and forensic chemistry.

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20 Credits
optional
Coursework

Code: 3PS500

Fundamentals of Human Behaviour

This module will introduce students to psychology as an integrated and multi-faceted discipline. Students will explore both classic and contemporary aspects of psychology from a position of little or no knowledge. They will gain an understanding of the breadth of psychology and the ways in which the topic areas included can be approached from a number of different theoretical perspectives using a variety of methodological approaches.
20 Credits
optional
Coursework

Code: 3SL501

Sociology

This module provides you with an introduction to the study of sociology. It is intended to encourage an understanding of core sociological theories, and to foster an awareness of sociological issues and phenomena. It is designed to develop your appreciation of how we evaluate the social world

The module emphasises core sociological theoretical perspectives, which include Marxism, feminism and functionalism. Theoretical perspectives are compared in their application to, and interpretation of, various social phenomena. The module aims to provide you with a basic of understanding of how we evaluate the lived experience and covers a range of topics in relation to the research process including; statistics, data gathering methods and how evidence is presented.

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20 Credits
optional
Practical
Coursework

Code: 4BY503

Ecology

Ecology is the branch of biology that deals with the relations of organisms to one another and to their physical surroundings. This module develops a basic understanding of the fundamental ideas and concepts that have been used to understand these interactions and the consequential distribution and abundance of species. The module will explore these aspects at different levels ranging from a focus on the individual up to full communities. The practical side of the module will introduce students to field techniques useful for both practical and scientific ecological investigations. The module will therefore form a sound basis of knowledge for studying ecological topics in the second and third year as well as a basic understanding of the breadth of ecology for those who do not take the discipline further.
20 Credits
core
Exam
Coursework

Code: 4BY534

Biodiversity

This module introduces students to the range of biodiversity on the planet, including lower plants, other plants and trees, invertebrate and vertebrate animals. Students will learn about systematic processes, identification skills and some aspects of the biology and ecology of the animals and plants that they study. This module forms a useful base for other modules as well as providing fundamental knowledge and skills that are appropriate in employment within various fields within environmental sciences.

Delivery of the subject will be achieved through a series of short lectures which will be supported by laboratory practical sessions, seminars and field visits. This will include observation of specimens for the understanding of the organism and the recognition of key identification features. Much of the teaching will be student centred so as to encourage their curiosity and a questioning attitude towards their work. As such, where appropriate, students will gather their own specimens for identification. Identification will start with relatively simple keys and work up to higher levels of accuracy and difficulty. 

Assessment will take two forms - a multiple-choice test and a digital portfolio of relevant material.

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20 Credits
core
Exam
Coursework

Code: 4EV503

Environmental Sustainability

Increasing population and rise of consumerism is impacting the planet in terms of pollution of natural environment and over-exploitation of limited resources. This module will be an interdisciplinary module drawing on environmental science and ecology, to develop knowledge and skills in the science underpinning environmental issues. However, at the same time, learning opportunities in politics, economics, policy and law help students to evaluate societies' role in, and interaction with changes in the natural world.

Much of the module will be framed around the UN’s Sustainable Development Goals. By the end of the module, students will be able to approach the difficult question of how we can continue to develop and improve human wellbeing without overstepping the planet’s ecological boundaries. It will cross the traditional divide between natural and social sciences providing a holistic perspective to environment and sustainability issues and to develop strategies towards a more sustainable future. Through group work and consideration of a range of case studies, students will develop an understanding of the many facets of sustainability.

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20 Credits
core
Coursework

Code: 4GG505

Global Environmental Issues

This module will introduce the current environmental issues that provide the greatest challenges to today’s global society. Environmental Geography deals explicitly with the relationships between people and the Natural Environment. The module will cover several key themes including the impact of population growth on the environment, the conflicts between population growth/land use/conservation programmes, the competition for food and water, the environmental impact of climate change, the potential loss of biodiversity, and the impact of pollution on the human population. The module will also include field visits that will illustrate some of these issues.
20 Credits
core
Exam
Coursework

Code: 4GL505

Earth Resources

The aim of this module is to introduce the concepts of reserves and resources, the geology of energy resources including hydrocarbons, the range, occurrence and importance of industrial minerals, methods of exploration and exploitation, industrial processes and the importance of geological resources to the construction industry and society. It is delivered mainly via lectures and associated practicals, tutorials and a site visit. Assessment is 100% coursework and will involve a group project and a computer-based assessment.
20 Credits
core
Coursework

Code: 4BY533

The Science of Life

This module provides students with a range of underpinning knowledge that can support their learning and development in the programme. It takes a deep learning problem-solving approach to teach, practice and apply a range of sciences including maths, physics and chemistry to the biological sciences. Sessions will investigate a range of biological questions and explore how we can use other sciences to help us answer such questions. In doing so the module seeks to get away from the traditional approach of learning other sciences and then applying them to biology – but instead encourages learning the background science required to explore biological questions.

It is envisaged that this biologically focussed approach will inspire curiosity and the enhance thirst for learning in students. As an example, we may choose to explore how chameleons change colour. This biological question requires knowledge of osmosis, intermolecular forces, lattice/crystalline structures and nanoparticles. Sessions will be carefully structured and sequenced to allow learners to develop an increasing knowledge of other sciences and how they might be applied to biology.

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20 Credits
core
Exam
Coursework

Code: 5BY535

Research Methods

This module will support the students in developing a solid foundational understanding of experimental design processes and considerations, as well as key probability and statistical analysis concepts. Students will be taught basic probability theory, leading to an understanding of probability distributions and density functions. We will then build on this by introducing the students to a range of basic statistical tests including t-tests and analysis of variance (ANOVA). Once students have gained confidence in the applications of these tests, linear regression methods will be introduced in order to prepare students for more advanced tests (which they are likely to need to use in their independent studies in the third year and potential careers).

The vast majority of researchers in the biological and zoological areas now use the statistical programming language R to conduct their analyses. Students will be introduced to R and shown how to implement the statistical analyses as well as basic simulations within R.

In addition, students will conduct design, run, and analyse an experiment run over several weeks, resulting in a simulation of a submission of a scientific paper. This will support the students in integrating their increasing knowledge of the application of experimental design and data analysis, as well as providing them with strong training in presenting their work in the form of a journal article.

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20 Credits
core
Exam
Coursework

Code: 5BY541

Ecosystem Services

Over the last 20 years, land management has moved in a new direction, where nature is quantitatively valued for the benefits it provides to people. These benefits are called ‘ecosystem services’. This way of thinking about the natural world allows nature to be integrated with economic, political and social considerations that inform land management at large and small scales. Ecosystem service assessment is still a fairly new and rapidly developing field in policy and research.

The module will explain the origins of the ecosystem services approach, the disciplines involved, and the practical application in research and in current policy and land management. Different approaches to valuation of ecosystem services and to evaluating trade-offs between services in landscape management will be explored. The module will address current thinking about ecosystem services to develop an understanding of how ecosystems support human life and how we can incorporate that dependence into policy and landscape planning for a more sustainable future.

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20 Credits
core
Coursework

Code: 5EV505

Environmental Legislation and Ethics

All human activity has an environmental impact, and as awareness of the negative impact of anthropogenic change has grown, so has national and international legislation, accreditation and ethical paradigm. This module will cover the principles upon which legislation is based, and methods of compliance and monitoring. Alongside the legal responsibilities, the benefits to businesses in engaging with accreditation and ethical schemes such as Forest Stewardship Council, Fairtrade and the UN Sustainable Development Goals will be explored

The module will range from local to international approaches, in tune with global business and the rise in supporting local enterprises. The learning will be supported and applied in a 30-hour micro placement.

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20 Credits
core
Coursework

Code: 5GG503

Research Methods in Geography

This module evaluates data types and sources in human and physical geography. The module focuses on both quantitative and qualitative data analysis and builds on the descriptive statistical approaches introduced at Level 4. Students are introduced to inferential tests and the interpretation of statistics. The module also introduces students to the analysis of verbal and non-verbal data. Students will then be able to develop and apply these skills in other modules (eg Mediterranean Environments, Cultural and Social Landscape, and Independent Study). The module is assessed by 100% coursework.
20 Credits
core
Coursework

Code: 5GG511

Sustainable Cities

This module will introduce current discussions of sustainable cities highlighting the challenges and opportunities of the rapidly urbanisation taking place all across the world. The module will provide understandings of the complex systems of people, resources and environment within urban areas. It will look at several themes pertaining to water, housing, energy, infrastructure, food, and economic, municipal and social planning systems. Learning and critically evaluating contemporary debates about sustainable urban spaces, with a specific focus on the human and physical processes shaping urban ecologies and environments. To help understand the concepts of smart cities, going beyond technology to learn about governance, resource and waste management, transport and communities working together with local governments.
20 Credits
core
Coursework

Code: 5BY513

Adaptation to Environment

The diversity of terrestrial and aquatic life can be divided into several large, distinct regions, biomes that are characterised by their plant and animal life. This module will consider this diversity, explore the underlying reasons for it and how plants and animals are adapted life in different biomes. The interactions of organisms within biomes will be considered. The module aims to develop an understanding of the impact of abiotic/biotic factors on the characteristics of life in different biomes. This is contextualised in terms of the impact of human activities and resilience of natural systems to unsustainable practices.
20 Credits
optional
Coursework

Code: 5GG508

Sustainable Energy Resources

This module will review the current sources of conventional and renewable fuels used for energy production in the UK and globally. The direct and indirect environmental impacts of these fuels will be considered. The current Energy Policy for the UK will be reviewed and how the issue of fuel poverty is being addressed. The module will then explore the role of renewable energies, and energy efficiency schemes, in providing and meeting the energy requirements of the UK, and in developing countries. Consideration will be given to both large and small scale renewable energy projects and a range of case studies will be considered. The module will review the concept of carbon footprints and carbon neutrality, and what is meant by environmental sustainability. The module will include a field site visit to view and assess how renewable energy can be successfully used to meet our energy needs.
20 Credits
optional
Coursework

Code: 5GG513

Introduction to Remote Sensing and GIS

This module provides a basic understanding of the theories and principles underpinning both satellite remote sensing and GIS and their application. In terms of remote sensing, it seeks to equip you with an understanding of the physical principles underpinning remote sensing, basic satellite image interpretation and processing techniques and the application of these techniques to helping us better understand the Earth’s terrestrial environment. In terms of GIS, it explores the history and origins of GIS, what constitutes a GIS, the value of geographic data, the issues associated with representing the real world in a computer using the raster and vector data models, selected applications of GIS and how to use GIS in practice to solve simple spatial problems. This module is quite technical in nature and content and makes extensive use of specialist computer software. It is delivered mainly via lectures and associated computer based practical’s (done with tutor support).

The module is assessed by 100% coursework.

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20 Credits
optional
Coursework

Code: 5SO528

Applied Professional Practice

This module provides a framework for the development of “lifelong learning” skills appropriate to all areas of professional practice; including objective setting, planning, negotiating, implementing, demonstrating and reflecting. The emphasis in this module is on the analysis and evaluation of the work completed within the organisation. This module also gives students an opportunity to relate their academic knowledge to the work environment.
40 Credits
core
Coursework

Code: 5SO529

Contemporary Issues in Professional Practice

Students need to be aware of the commercial realities and external factors that influence the success of an organisation. This module provides opportunities for students to acquire an understanding of contemporary issues that may impact on industrial and professional practices relevant to a career within their chosen discipline.

During this period of work experience, students can gain a deeper appreciation of the responsibilities arising from both corporate and individual responses to such issues, thus enabling them to relate to the wider world when exploring a personal direction for potential career development.

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20 Credits
core
Coursework

Code: 6EV503

Business and Sustainability

The business world is now grappling with the need to embrace environmental sustainability. Legislation and changes in consumer priorities are driving this direction of travel. This can be seen in the rebranding of fossil fuel companies to energy, the accelerated development of electric cars, the discussions around carbon footprint of food and the use of charismatic mega fauna and iconic landscapes in promoting business goods and services.

Underneath the surface, what are businesses doing, and what is the potential for reducing and mitigating environmental impact and perhaps even becoming environmentally positive in impact? 

This module will look at the current practices and opportunities for business, and will evaluate whether current activities are effective and sustainable. All scales of business will be explored, from sole traders to multinationals. Compliance and market advantage will be considered.

This module will incorporate a residential field trip to witness and analyse sustainable business practices, and consider their application to other businesses. A virtual alternative will be available to students unable to participate on the physical trip.

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20 Credits
core
Coursework

Code: 6EV504

Industrial Project

This module provides an opportunity for students to put their learning into practice within a professional environment through undertaking an industrial based project. Students will work with recognised organisations on appropriate sustainability projects that are relevant to business and/or society. Students will be mentored by a University supervisor and a key contact within the professional organisation.

Projects may form part of a larger initiative but will be discrete enough to allow students to demonstrate their ability to take a project through from start to finish.

The assessment requires students to produce a range of relevant outputs (such as a blog, reports, posters, executive summaries, models, presentations and websites) including material for a course-wide showcase event that allows them to explain their projects to stakeholders through a range of appropriate media. These outputs will vary based on the requirements of the industrial partner and their appropriateness to the project.

Students will be supported by a range of underpinning lectures and one-to-one and group support from their mentors.  

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40 Credits
core
Coursework

Code: 6EV999

Independent Studies for Geoscience

This module represents an opportunity for students to exercise initiative, creative thinking, time management and organisational skills in the pursuit of an independent (but tutor supported) piece of research work of their own choosing (subject to approval on academic, safety and ethical grounds). It is a continuation of the process of Personal Development Planning (PDP) initiated in level 4 and 5, to develop an advanced skill-set which will enhance the ‘graduateness’ and employability of students. Central to the research study will be a degree of problem solving, the formulation and testing of hypotheses and the critical evaluation of relevant theory. The research can, if required, be undertaken in a work based / placement context. The module is assessed by 100% coursework.
40 Credits
core
Coursework

Code: 6GG501

Climate Change: Adaptation and Mitigation Perspectives

This module aims to develop a sound understanding of the nature and causes of climate change. By way of introduction, attention is focused upon the nature and causes of climate change over the past 11,000 years with consideration given to the mid-Holocene climatic optimum, the Little Ice Age, Medieval warm period, and post-Industrial revolution period. Attention then focuses upon the climate of the late twentieth/early twenty-first century. The role of various internal and external forcing mechanisms is then considered. A critical analysis is provided of the range of adaptation strategies that society might adopt.

To develop an understanding of relationships between climate change, impacts and selection of appropriate adaptation strategies extensive use will be made of recent case-studies from developed counties, Economies in Transition (EIT) countries and developing countries. Four key climate mitigation questions that are relevant to policymaking are also examined: What can be done to reduce the threats of climate change? What are the costs of such actions (or inaction)? How can reductions in greenhouse gases be achieved? Are climate change mitigation policies sustainable overtime? This module comprises 12 lectures. The module is assessed by 50% coursework and 50% exam.

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20 Credits
core
Coursework

Code: 6GG506

Environmental Management: Critical Perspectives

This module will consider the role that environmental management plays in the reduction of waste and in the effective management of natural resources. The methods of waste recycling both in the UK and globally will be reviewed. This will include a site visit to a recycling facility. The role of policy setting as a tool to prevent and control environmental impacts will be reviewed. In addition, the environmental impact assessment methodology will be considered through the use of case studies. The application of environmental management systems to businesses and organisations is reviewed through the use of case studies. Finally, the module will critically review the implementation of environmental management schemes in developing countries and how these methods are impacting on their population.
20 Credits
core
Coursework

Code: 6BY508

Wildlife Conservation

The conservation of biological diversity is a complex multidisciplinary science. Despite a rapid growth in public interest, funding and local regional and international efforts the loss of species and habitats continues at a rate consistent with historical mass extinctions. Currently, in 2016, the IUCN estimates that up to 37% of mammals, 14% of birds and 56% of amphibian species are threatened with extinction. This module examines the factors that are causing this decline and the strategies that can be implemented to preserve as much of the remaining biological diversity of the Earth as possible. These issues are complex and multifaceted and, whilst the module will concentrate on the biological principles of conservation biology, it will also approach the topic from the multidisciplinary perspective that is required to find a lasting solution to these issues.
20 Credits
optional
Coursework

Code: 6BY526

Student Initiated Module

This module aims to provide a route for individual learners to undertake an activity or range of activities that allow them to achieve specific learning goals. The module allows students to take responsibility for their own learning needs, effectively building on their existing skills and experiences as a basis for engagement in more in-depth learning relevant to their degree, personal development and future career plans. Student learners will be paired with an advisor (and sometimes a mentor) and will negotiate a learning contract that identifies what they want to achieve and how they will be assessed (subject to the requirements and standards of the University and the QAA).

As such the module provides a route for students to study aspects of their chosen programme that are not covered elsewhere and a means for high-level engagement and development of knowledge and skills that provide for personal attainment and satisfaction as well as increased progression to graduate-level destinations. The module also allows for the development of innovative assessment and pioneering ways of learning that are student-led and play to their strengths. In addition, the module provides an excellent platform for the development and demonstration of transferable skills, especially regarding the management of one’s own personal development.

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20 Credits
optional
Coursework

Code: 6EC508

Economics of Sustainable Business Growth

This module explores issues concerning how businesses, government and not-for-profit leaders and managers can better integrate the needs of the environment, people, and profits in the short and long term. In this module, you will gain a comprehensive understanding of what is meant by the term sustainability and the values that help develop a model for business sustainability. You will analyse the UN Global Compact, which is a strategic policy initiative for businesses, and apply this to case studies introduced in the module.

During this module you will be expected to reflect on the theory presented and real-life examples introduced. This will enable you to develop your own thoughts and propose potential solutions to the opportunities and challenges of sustainable growth that face businesses at a local, regional, national and international level today.

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20 Credits
optional
Coursework

Code: 6EV500

Applied GIS

This module provides an appropriate portfolio of subject knowledge and applied skills typically required for an introductory position in the field of GIS or for going on to specialist postgraduate study in GIS. It also aims to produce students capable of independently solving problems using GIS. Important themes in GIS are explored from both a theoretical and practical perspective, including data capture / input, data accuracy / error, databases, surface modelling, derived mapping, the use of new technologies and different approaches to problem solving. It is delivered mainly via lectures and associated computer based practical’s (done with tutor support) and fieldwork. The module is assessed by 100% coursework.
20 Credits
optional
Practical
Coursework

Code: 6GG502

Global Food Security and Food Futures

The overall aim of this module is to explore theoretical arguments and analysis of food security within the context of (a) historical inequalities and power relations between richer and poorer nations; (b) global agri-food systems that shape world food production, consumption and distribution; (c) entitlement to food at an individual and at a household level; and (d) global food futures and sustainability within emerging knowledge of water shortages, environmental degradation, climate change. Whilst students will gain insights into global behaviour regarding food relations, the module will specifically draw on case studies from global south countries to illustrate any of the above. This module comprises 12 classroom sessions including lectures and problem-solving exercises. The module is assessed by 100% coursework.
20 Credits
optional
Coursework

Please note that our modules are subject to change - we review the content of our courses regularly, making changes where necessary to improve your experience and graduate prospects.

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How you will learn

We use a diverse range of assessment methods, including essays, reports, field and laboratory notebooks, portfolios, posters, infographics oral presentations, vivas, and written exams (seen and unseen). You may be assessed individually or as part of a group. We’ve mapped our assessments against key graduate skillsets that employers require.

Personal academic tutoring

Your personal academic tutor will work with you to help you get the most out of your time at university. Having someone to talk to about your academic progress, your university experience and your professional aspirations is hugely valuable. We want you to feel challenged in your studies, stretched but confident to achieve your academic and professional goals.

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Who will teach you

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Dr Debadayita Raha
Programme leader

Dr Debadayita (Deb) Raha is a lecturer in Human and Developmental Geography at the University of Derby. Her research interests lie in the multidisciplinary field of social science and environmental impact on people's lives. She has previously worked at the University of Nottingham looking at whole systems analysis of small scale renewable energy for rural communities in UK and India.

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Entry requirements

September 2021 typical entry requirements

RequirementWhat we're looking for
UCAS points72
Specific requirements at A-level

No specific subject requirements

Specific requirements at GCSE

GCSE Maths and English are preferred, however if you don't have these qualifications you will be able to undertake Maths and English at Level 2 as part of your course of study.

IELTS6.0 (with 5.5 in each skills area)
Interview / AuditionN/A
PortfolioN/A

Alternative entry qualifications:

We usually consider an A-level in General Studies as a supplementary qualification. A good application/performance will be taken into account if you do not meet the criteria/offer conditions.

Our entry requirements for this course should be read together with the University's general entry requirements, which details subjects we accept, alternative qualifications and what we're looking for at Derby.

Fees and funding

2021/22 Fees

Fees for entry in the 2021/22 academic year have not been confirmed yet.

As soon as the fees have been confirmed, they will be displayed on our course pages.

Further information about our fees and support you may be entitled to.

How to apply

UK/EU students

Full-time students applying to start in September should apply for this course through UCAS.

Apply through UCASApply directly to the University

Guidance for EU students post-Brexit

Careers

As part of the consultative process when creating the course, we engaged with leaders from across the industry to ensure that the content we deliver is aligned to the skills and experience that employers need from graduates now and in the future. These included representatives from industry, the United Nations Environment and Development UK Committee, local authorities, and environmental consultancies.

Your experience will be valued by organisations where sustainable growth is a priority. This could include helping them to achieve targets such as moving to 100% renewable energy, increasing their energy production or switching to electric vehicles. You could also lead on developing strategies for conserving wildlife, better waste management, reducing greenhouse gases, managing environmental and sustainability plans, designing sustainable environments, and much more. Companies are investing in experts who can strategically advise the business and educate their workforce. As the importance of sustainability continues to grow, the diversity of career options is increasing too. Sectors you could go into include:

The EU Economy Report in 2019 showed that between 2000 and 2016 there was a 38% increase in environmental employment and a 68% increase in gross value added. EU employment in renewable energy also increased from 600,000 in 2000 to 1.7million in 2016.

Your skills will be in high demand in the green sector of the economy, and will be closely aligned to the goals outlined in international agreements, such as The United Nations Sustainability Development Goals, the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change, and the Convention on Biological Diversity.

Through our Professional Development Package, you'll gain valuable skills, including:

Careers and Employment Service

To boost your employment skills, you can access the University's Careers and Employment Service. The team can connect you with employers to help find opportunities for work placements, part-time jobs, and volunteering. Our careers consultants are also on hand to guide you through the career options for your degree, CV writing, or starting your own business - and we commit to helping you for three years after you graduate to find a job.

Contact us

If you need any more information from us, eg on courses, accommodation, applying, car parking, fees or funding, please contact us and we will do everything we can to help you.

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Additional information about your studies

Teaching hours

Like most universities, we operate extended teaching hours at the University of Derby, so contact time with your lecturers and tutors could be anytime between 9am and 9pm. Your timetable will usually be available on the website 24 hours after enrolment on to your course.

Please note: Our courses are refreshed and updated on a regular basis. If you are thinking about transferring onto this course (into the second year for example), you should contact the programme leader for the relevant course information as modules may vary from those shown on this page.

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