Available in clearing

 - Call 01332 592020

Course details

Study options

Full-time: 3 years, Part-time: 4-6 years

UK/EU fee

£9,250 per year (2020/21)

International fee

£14,045 per year (2020/21)

UCAS points

112* (September 2020 entry)

UCAS code

Y002

Course level

Undergraduate

Qualification

Joint Honours

Start date

September

Location

Markeaton Street and Britannia Mill Studios

This course is open for September 2020 entry only. It will not be available for September 2021.

What is Joint Honours?

A Joint Honours degree gives you the opportunity to study two subjects as one degree. This type of degree will broaden your skill set and enhance your career prospects.

You can combine any two subjects as long as they’re in different zones, find out what you can combine this subject with.

Course description

Focus on the fast-paced world of film and TV as part of your Joint Honours degree – and prepare for an exciting future in the creative and cultural industries.

This course develops your critical and theoretical understanding of the moving image, drawing on a wide variety of disciplines including history, psychology, cultural studies and aesthetics.

You’ll consider areas such as genre, narration and the film and TV industry while exploring related topics such as film history, contemporary research and the context of production.

As a joint honours student you will also have the opportunity to undertake an extended project within Film and Television.

Students at Harry Potter Warner Bros studio
Trip to Harry Potter Warner Bros studios

Professional links to inspire you

Our strong network of contacts within film and TV will open doors for you. We have close ties with QUAD, the arts and media centre which acts as a creative and cultural force for Derby and features an acclaimed independent cinema. The Chief Executive of QUAD – Adam Buss – is one of our Film and Television graduates. 

We also offer exciting opportunities for you to hear from industry experts via guest lectures, become involved with QUAD cinema and field trips such as to British Board of Film Classification, the London Film Museum and the National Media Museum.

Industry insights and work experience

As part of the course, there is the chance for you to attend a number of film festivals and we encourage you to undertake volunteering opportunities within the sector. Our close links with QUAD pave the way for you to support the marketing and promotion of their annual film festival.

In the second year of your studies, you will select a work experience project and you can gain experience of the creative and cultural industries.

The course also features an opportunity for you to focus on communication and produce a range of coursework including essays, video essays, presentations and a dissertation.  His subject focuses on film and television theory with some practical options and elements included in some modules to apply theory to practical examples.

We sometimes organise an activity for students take part in towards the end of the academic year such as a Filmmaking Summer School.

Learn from an expert team

You will be taught by active researchers who will challenge and motivate you to get the most out of your studies. Our staff have industry experience and research expertise in areas ranging from British TV drama to international horror films, from science fiction on screen to fandom and cult media.

Our Film and Television subject leader, Teresa Forde, has published on science fiction film and television drama, including in the Intellect fandom series on Doctor Who. Senior Lecturer Nathan Hunt has published on video games and zombies.

They will build on your understanding of film theory within a critical and cultural framework.

Study in America

You can choose to study part of your degree at one of our partner universities in America:

Improve your career prospects

A Joint Honours degree fosters your analytical, evaluative, critical and creative thinking, together with your ability to learn and synthesise new skills and ideas.

Joint Honours gives you the flexibility to cover two subjects in one degree and you will also be able to demonstrate your organisational skills and capacity to work to deadlines, communicate effectively and carry out independent research. 

Our students have taken the opportunity to combine Film and Television Studies with a range of other subjects within the Joint Honours Scheme . Joint Honours subject combinations include:

What you will study

Example modules are shown below, the modules available as a Joint Honours student will be dependent on the subject that you combine with. In your first year, modules will be defined for you, and will be dependent on your subject combination to ensure you have the best fit. In your second and third years, module availability and the number of modules you are required to take will depend on whether you choose this subject as a major, joint or minor.

Year 1Year 1Year 2Year 2Year 3Year 3

Code: 4FT506

Film and Television: Text and Context

In this module the student will learn to connect the textual considerations along with the context of film and television industries and practices of production, distribution and exhibition.

You will consider how institutional and technological change becomes apparent through the content and appearance of what is projected on the screen or broadcast. You will explore the relationship between genre study and film and television with a particular focus on how and why films and television programmes have been made. At the same time you will also explore notions of branding and promotion in relation to film and television. Students will engage with the history of public broadcasting as well as historical and institutional developments within film and overarching issues such as censorship and multi-platform production. This module will also include guest speakers and field trips, as appropriate.

The module will be presented as a combination of lectures, in which there will ample opportunity for discussion, and tutorials. Lectures will introduce key concepts, institutional contexts and critical approaches. Screenings will make primary visual materials available for study, and class-time will also dedicated to detailed discussion of context of these texts. Tutorial support will be made available to students. There will be a number of formative tasks for students to engage with in preparation for their assessed coursework such as critical evaluation of reading and case studies.

More information
20 Credits
optional
Coursework

Code: 4FT507

Screening America

Through the study of its history and through detailed discussion of particular movies and critical approaches to film, this module offers an introduction to Hollywood cinema in the Studio Era. Issues discussed will include the emergence and development of the studio system, the star system, and the construction of “Classical Hollywood” film style.

The module will also emphasise the ideological contexts which have shaped these movies, and so will consider the broader historical and political pressures brought to bear on Hollywood production and consumption. In the module’s second half, through the study of specific texts, the history of the American television industry, and detailed discussion of critical approaches, you will receive an introduction to US TV’s visual styles and aesthetic strategies, its institutional and ideological histories, from its inception to the decline of the major networks in the 1980s. Thus, you will examine the formal and aesthetic properties of production, the contexts of consumption and criticism, and the relationship of genres to issues such as race, class and gender.

More information
20 Credits
optional
Coursework

Code: 4FV515

Image, Industry and Analysis

This module introduces you to the key tools used for the analysis of the moving image. It will look at the relationships between appropriate media and cultural institutions, forms and practices.

It will ask you to consider these debates within the context of your own modes of production. You will be introduced to key methods of textual analysis and will utilise these to explore questions of representation and identity. You will develop a socio-cultural and political perspective on the significance of film and media and will be asked to consider the growing importance of new media technologies such as the internet and video games in relation to your own role as a filmmaker.

More information
20 Credits
optional
Coursework

Code: 4FV516

The Wider Screen

The aim of this module is to examine the importance of cinematic production outside of the Hollywood mainstream. Building on the critical framework established in Image, Industry and Analysis it will further develop your understanding of the critical perspectives used in the analysis of moving image work.

Through a number of case studies you will interrogate the relationship between cinematic production, politics, society, culture, and national identity. You will explore the way in which national cinemas can both rely on the codes and conventions established by Hollywood, as well as the degree to which they reject these codes in favour of more culturally specific forms of cinema.

More information
20 Credits
optional
Coursework

Code: 5AM502

American Youth Cinema

This module examines how youth has been represented in American cinema, using a range of cinematic texts from the 1950s onwards to the present day. It will consider to what extent ‘youth films’ are an established genre with formal characteristics and styles or whether they are a hybrid cinematic form that crosses generic boundaries. It will raise key questions about the significance of youth within American culture and relate these issues to the different ways in which American film has sought to project, contain, analyse and celebrate youth cultures.

These ideas will be examined in close relation to notions of formula, markets and audience. In particular, the module will examine how early representations of youth established frameworks and discourses that have been both influential in later films and provided powerful images and forms against which other films have constructed alternative youth identities and variant cinematic styles.

The module will consider such (indicative) themes as rebellion and conformity, the construction of gendered and sexual identity, race and ethnicity, relationships of power between youth and authority (family, school, police etc.), youth ‘branding’ and formulaic film.

More information
20 Credits
optional
Coursework

Code: 5FT513

Critical Perspectives

This module aims to contextualise the study of film and/or television and develop the ability to undertake individual research within the wider framework. It introduces students to research skills and issues in preparation level three.

In particular, it aims to introduce through case studies some of the major theoretical and critical issues and debates relevant to the study of film/television, such as globalisation, realism and psychoanalysis. It also aims to develop critical thinking, independent research and enhance study skills. It requires students to develop research skills and transferable skills for potential research and career contexts and in preparation for Independent Study at Level 6.

More information
20 Credits
optional
Coursework

Code: 5FT514

Image/Music/Sound

This module aims to explore the relationship between sound and image, the study of music in relation to film and television and the development of uses of soundtrack as music, voice and sound effects in relation to the image track. The module seeks to explore sound and music as integral aspects of filmic and television and critically understand the way that sound and music have developed both as particular practices and within a range of theoretical perspectives.
20 Credits
optional
Coursework

Code: 5MR515

Work Experience Project

This module is designed to enable you to gain, and reflect upon, experience that contributes to your employability and understanding of working in the media, cultural and creative industries and related careers.
20 Credits
optional
Coursework

Code: 6AM501

New Hollywood and Beyond

This module will investigate issues in contemporary American cinema, where “contemporary” is interpreted as films made after the Vietnam War and the emergence of the “New Hollywood.” Centrally, the module will be concerned with how its status as a commodity impacts upon film form and content. We will examine trends in American cinema that have realigned the relationships between films and their audiences and how these changing relations have affected both production and consumption.

Although aware of and examining the presence of Hollywood’s global corporate power and its control over film making and distribution, the module will also pay attention to the diversity of film-making, and the need to appeal to multiple audiences in terms of race, class, gender and other factors. Thus concepts central to Film Studies such as auteur theory, genre, stardom, the roles of independent cinema, and institutions will all be explored as they persist and change within contemporary film cultures.

Films will be examined as ideological texts that function as part of the wider social (and global) order that produces and consumes them, and that relate to and clearly dialogue with the political, economic, social and cultural forces from which they emerge.

More information
20 Credits
optional
Coursework

Code: 6FT508

Alternative Practices

The module will study a range of alternative practices within cinema, including world cinema, cult cinema and experimental cinema and installation whilst critically exploring the meaning of these key terms in the context of alternative practices. The module will also consider the work of exhibition and curation where appropriate and will refer to independent cinema networks, retrospectives, touring collections and festivals and evaluate the relevance of organisations such as QUAD, MACE and BFI archives in promoting the circulation of alternative cinematic practices.
20 Credits
optional
Coursework

Code: 6FT509

Horror/Nation

This module aims to contextualise the study of film and/or television and develop the ability to undertake individual research within the wider framework. It introduces students to research skills and issues in preparation level three.

In particular, it aims to introduce through case studies some of the major theoretical and critical issues and debates relevant to the study of film/television, such as globalisation, realism and psychoanalysis. It also aims to develop critical thinking, independent research and enhance study skills. It requires students to develop research skills and transferable skills for potential research and career contexts and in preparation for Independent Study at Level 6.

More information
20 Credits
optional
Coursework

Code: 6FT510

Cyberbodies

The module will provide an analysis of the concept of cyberbodies across a range of science fiction, technothriller and documentary films. The module explores theoretical approaches to the concept of the body and technology in relation to themes such as the cityscape, surveillance, alien invasion and memory construction.

Students will be provided with an introduction to specific terminology and key texts in order to explore concept of cyberbodies as a framework of engaging with examples of science fiction and technothrillers from film and television.

More information
20 Credits
optional
Coursework

Code: 6MR511

Ready Player One: Videogames, Technology and Gamification

What is a videogame? Why have they been so successful? This module examines the prominent position of digital games within contemporary media culture from the analysis of games as media texts to the gamification of contemporary media culture. It covers the historical development and emergence of gaming as one of the largest of the contemporary global creative industries and examines the relationship between games, global media, technology and the audiences who consume games.

You will explore games as a creative medium, interactive storytelling.

Attention is also paid to the larger place of gaming technologies within postmodern societies and the relationship between digital gaming and other media forms and platforms such as cinema and advertising and the ‘gamification’ of social media and mobile technologies.

More information
20 Credits
optional
Coursework

Code: 6MR995

Independent Study

The Independent Study provides you with the opportunity to engage in a piece of extended research or practice. It develops your research skills and enables you to develop a detailed knowledge of a subject of interest you. The Independent Study enhances your employability through the development of advanced research and writing skills or individual creative practice and the ability to self-manage a substantial research project.

The module enables a choice of assessment methods: You have the opportunity to engage in a piece of extended research and scholarship related to the fields of media, film and communication studies, to utilise work experience or placement in a piece of industry-focused academic research, or to engage in independent creative practice in an area such as documentary, video essay.

More information
40 Credits
optional
Coursework

Please note that our modules are subject to change - we review the content of our courses regularly, making changes where necessary to improve your experience and graduate prospects.

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Campus Tours

Campus Tours are a great way to explore our campuses, facilities and halls of residence. We’ll be running the tours in two-hour timeslots, giving you the best possible experience while adhering to social distancing guidelines.

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Virtual Open Day

Delve deeper into the course with our Virtual Open Day, packed with subject and course information to help you make your choice, including tours of facilities, 360° views of award-winning accommodation plus advice and insight from students and academics.

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How you will learn

This subject is delivered via lectures, seminars and tutorials. You will be asked to produce coursework within each module and will be provided with full feedback in order to improve your work.

You will benefit from the support of our study advisers based in the library as well as study workshops run by the library.

How you will be assessed

Film and Television Studies is assessed via a range of coursework, such as essays, video essays, projects and presentations. There are no formal exams.

Who you will meet

You will be taught by a highly qualified and experienced team of lecturers, with individual areas of expertise and research in film and TV studies. They include:

Dr Teresa Forde - Subject Leader for Film and Television who has published on a range of work on film and television. Her particular interests are in science fiction, soundtrack, cultural theory, fandom, and memory in relation to film and TV. Her publications include chapters on True Blood and The L Word in Television Finales (Syracuse, 2018), a chapter on Fringe in Women's Space: Essays on Female Characters in the 21st Century Science Fiction Western (McFarland, 2019) and the co-edited The Legacy of Mad Men (Palgrave, due 2019).

Simon Philo - Simon's research interests include transatlantic popular music, art in the 1960s, the cultural Vietnam War, and US TV. Simon has published chapters and journal articles on The Simpsons, MTV in Europe, US TV teen dramas, Vietnam War literature, Pop Art, punk, ska and the Rolling Stones. He is the author of British Invasion: The Crosscurrents of Musical Influence (2015) and Glam Rock: Music in Sound and Vision (2018).

Dr Nathan Hunt - Nathan’s research interests span fandom and cult media, taste and popular culture, Hollywood cinema, science fiction and horror, consumer cultures, magazines and the cultural industries, audiences and reception, video games and game culture, masculinity in the media, and postmodernism in film and television. He has published on themes ranging from cult TV to film fan cultures, contributing most recently to a collection on The Zombie Renaissance in Popular Culture (Palgrav).

Tom Craig - Tom is Programme leader for Film Production and teaches on film and television studies with a special interest in horror. Tom has experience in the film industry within film finance and production. He is also the Creative Director of Big Brain Films.

Personal academic tutoring

Your personal academic tutor will work with you to help you get the most out of your time at university. Having someone to talk to about your academic progress, your university experience and your professional aspirations is hugely valuable. We want you to feel challenged in your studies, stretched but confident to achieve your academic and professional goals.

Find out more about personal academic tutoring

Who will teach you

Dr Teresa Forde
Programme leader

Teresa is a Senior Lecturer in Film and Media Studies.

View full staff profileView full staff profile

Entry requirements

September 2020 typical entry requirements

RequirementWhat we're looking for
UCAS points112* (up to 16 from AS-levels)
Specific requirements at A-level

No specific subject requirements

Specific requirements at GCSEGCSE Maths and English Grade C/Grade 4 (or above) or equivalent qualification
Interview / AuditionN/A
PortfolioN/A

Alternative entry qualifications:

For joint honours degree entry you will need to choose two subjects. The entry criteria here is for this subject only. Your offer will be based on the higher entry criteria from the two subjects you choose to do. A good application/performance will be taken into account if you do not meet the criteria/offer conditions.

*The UCAS Points required for entry will depend on the subjects you choose to combine. The subject with the higher entry requirements will determine your offer.

Our entry requirements for this course should be read together with the University's general entry requirements, which details subjects we accept, alternative qualifications and what we're looking for at Derby.

September 2021 typical entry requirements

RequirementWhat we're looking for
UCAS points112*
Specific requirements at A-level

No specific subject requirements

Specific requirements at GCSEGCSE Maths and English Grade C/Grade 4 (or above) or equivalent qualification
Interview / AuditionN/A
PortfolioN/A

Alternative entry qualifications:

For Joint Honours degree entry you will need to choose two subjects. The entry criteria here is for this subject only. Your offer will be based on the higher entry criteria from the two subjects you choose to do. A good application/performance will be taken into account if you do not meet the criteria/offer conditions.

*The UCAS Points required for entry will depend on the subjects you choose to combine. The subject with the higher entry requirements will determine your offer.

Our entry requirements for this course should be read together with the University's general entry requirements, which details subjects we accept, alternative qualifications and what we're looking for at Derby.

Fees and funding

2020/21 Fees

 Full-timePart-time
UK/EU

£9,250 per year

£1,155 per 20 credit module

International

£14,045 per year

N/A

Further information about our fees and support you may be entitled to.

Additional costs and optional extras

How to apply

This course is open for September 2020 entry only. It will not be available for September 2021.

UK/EU students

Full-time students applying to start in September should apply for this course through UCAS or you can apply directly to the University for an undergraduate course if you’re not applying to any other UK university in the same year.

Part-time students should apply directly to the University.

Apply through UCASApply directly to the University

Guidance for EU students post-Brexit

International students

Full-time students applying to start in September should apply for this course through UCAS or you can apply directly to the University for an undergraduate course if you’re not applying to any other UK university in the same year.

Apply through UCASApply directly to the University

Guidance for international applicants applying for an undergraduate degree

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Clearing

If you don’t have a place at uni, have had a change of heart about your course, or maybe your gap year plans are on hold – don’t worry. Call our Clearing hotline on 01332 592020 and explore your options.

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Careers

Graduates from this subject have secured jobs in media-related careers such as cinema marketing or management, television production, television research, journalism, public relations and radio production.

You could also progress to roles in lecturing, teaching, museum work, library work and film archiving. If you want to continue your studies, you can consider postgraduate courses in subjects like film-making, scriptwriting, journalism or teacher training.

Graduate success story

Leigh Small, a Film and Television Joint Honours student, worked on a graphics traineeship with ITV News Group. After completing his training at ITV Central, Leigh was promoted to a fully fledged graphic designer for ITV in Newcastle and he is now a freelance Graphic motion Designer working with a variety of media companies.

Annika Wilmot, a Joint Honours student with a major in Film and Television Studies, is a Production Co-ordinator at BBC Studios who has worked on programmes such as Children in Need.

Drew Taylour Davis, a Film Studies graduate, is a Director of Future Proof Films, a successful video production company Future Proof Films which also produces video content for a range of high profile companies.

Dale Beaumont Brown from Elixir Media has recently made an award winning documentary about wrestling, This is Progress

We also have Film and Television Studies alumni who are teaching in schools and Further Education, librarians, archivists and marketing managers.

Contact us

If you need any more information from us, eg on courses, accommodation, applying, car parking, fees or funding, please contact us and we will do everything we can to help you.

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Additional information about your studies

You will typically study your two subjects equally at stage one, before choosing whether you want to major in one subject at stages two and three.

Teaching hours

Like most universities, we operate extended teaching hours at the University of Derby, so contact time with your lecturers and tutors could be anytime between 9am and 9pm. Your timetable will usually be available on the website 24 hours after enrolment on to your course.

Additional costs and optional extras

We’re committed to providing you with an outstanding learning experience. Our expert teaching, excellent facilities and great employability prepare you for your future career. As part of our commitment to you we aim to keep any additional study costs to a minimum. However, there are occasions where students may incur some additional costs.

The information below is correct for entry in the academic year September 2020 - August 2021 only. Entry for future academic years may be subject to change.

Included in your fees

Mandatory costs not included in your fees

Optional costs not included in your fees

Please note: Our courses are refreshed and updated on a regular basis. If you are thinking about transferring onto this course (into the second year for example), you should contact the programme leader for the relevant course information as modules may vary from those shown on this page.

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Film and Television Studies can be combined with:

Accounting

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For this combination Discover Uni does not have enough data to publish a widget. It is important to note that this is not a reflection on the quality of the course.

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For this combination Discover Uni does not have enough data to publish a widget. It is important to note that this is not a reflection on the quality of the course.

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For this combination Discover Uni does not have enough data to publish a widget. It is important to note that this is not a reflection on the quality of the course.

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For this combination Discover Uni does not have enough data to publish a widget. It is important to note that this is not a reflection on the quality of the course.

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For this combination Discover Uni does not have enough data to publish a widget. It is important to note that this is not a reflection on the quality of the course.

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For this combination Discover Uni does not have enough data to publish a widget. It is important to note that this is not a reflection on the quality of the course.

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For this combination Discover Uni does not have enough data to publish a widget. It is important to note that this is not a reflection on the quality of the course.

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For this combination Discover Uni does not have enough data to publish a widget. It is important to note that this is not a reflection on the quality of the course.

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For this combination Discover Uni does not have enough data to publish a widget. It is important to note that this is not a reflection on the quality of the course.

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