Apply now for September

Course details

Study options

Full-time: 4 years

UK fee

£9,250 per year* (2020/21)

UCAS points

72 (September 2020 entry)

UCAS code

Q310

Course level

Undergraduate

Qualification

BA (Hons)

Start date

September

Location

Kedleston Road, Derby Campus

Course description

It has been argued that reality, as we each experience it, is an effect of language. Literary language, for Martin Amis, conducts a ‘war against cliché’ which unsettles our ideas about the world.

This exciting, diverse and challenging course enables you to explore the consequences of those ideas, and to combine the analysis of the English language, the study of literary history and the theoretically-informed close reading of literature.

This degree incorporates not only the close analysis of literature but also the study of the English language. You will consider both in relation to intellectual history, cultural politics and theories emerging from linguistics.

It provides you with a firm grounding in the skills and knowledge you need and introduces you to the subject of english, enabling you to achieve your full honours degree in four years.

A stimulating study programme

You will be introduced to a range of cultural expression from across the world and from diverse historical periods, broadening your understanding of the variety of human experience and the way it is captured in different literary modes.

The degree will develop your appreciation of the key differences in approach between English Language and English Literature, while also encouraging interdisciplinary study. You will take a range of modules which complement and inform each other, with a focus on how both ‘ordinary’ language and ‘literary’ language interact with ideology, discourse and power.

If you are studying the optional TESOL pathway, the TESOL modules build on the knowledge of language gained in your first year, and start with a second year placement in an educational context. You will be given a grounding in TESOL teaching theory and methodology, culminating in TESOL teaching practice in the third year.

Tailored to suit your interests

This course provides real choice and flexibility: you can select from a wide range of optional modules in stages two and three to focus on your own interests. These offer a broad variety as well as combinations of complementary subjects.

You could, for instance, combine ‘Gender and Identity in Contemporary Literature’ with ‘Language and Identity’ or you could study ‘The Globalisation(s) of English’ alongside ‘Colonialism and Independence’. It means you will benefit from a coherent study programme in which you can explore different but strongly related disciplines.

A career focused degree

An English degree opens up exciting career options and we provide exceptional support to maximise your employability and equip you with the skills employers are looking for. In Personal Development Planning (PDP) interviews throughout your degree, your tutor will help you to explore your career aspirations, review your PDP file and advise on the development of your transferable skills.

You will also have the chance to apply your knowledge in the working world through our Work-Based Learning modules where you can undertake projects and placements at cultural institutions, and you will benefit from our programme of employability workshops and talks.

Not just lectures and classrooms

You can take part in study visits to cinemas, film festivals, theatres, museums, galleries and heritage centres where you can observe and put what you are learning into practice.

We also work closely with the Derby-based 1623 Theatre Company so you have the opportunity to try your hand at directing play scenes, and with Writing East Midlands so you can contribute to writing-related events,You could not have a better backdrop to your studies than Derbyshire. The county has a strong literary heritage and inspired many great writers including Jane Austen, Walter Scott, Charlotte Brontё, George Eliot and Henry James.

Inspirational teaching

You will be taught by an enthusiastic team with research expertise covering a broad spectrum of literary and linguistic interests. 

You will also be inspired by guest seminars and lectures, including those given by our Visiting Professor, Catherine Belsey, an internationally-recognised scholar whose work has profoundly influenced the way English is studied and taught.

Study in America

You can choose to spend part of your degree studying at one of our partner universities in America:

If you are studying the TESOL pathway, you will be able to take part in summer camps in places such as Lithuania and Estonia instead, which will enable you to get gain first-hand experience of teaching English.

You can also study our Integrated Masters in English (M.Lit) or our BA (Hons) English. You could also combine English with another subject - find out more about our joint honours degrees.

Foundation Year - helping you to achieve more

Including a foundation year as part of your four-year study programme will give you a head start in your academic and professional life. The foundation year offers the chance to strengthen your skills, knowledge and confidence – with extensive support from our expert staff – before you advance to stage one of your honours degree. It could also be beneficial if you are planning a career change and want to get to grips with aspects of subjects which are new to you.

Our degrees with a foundation year are continuous, meaning that you won’t need to apply again once you have successfully completed the first year.

What you will study

Foundation YearFoundation YearYear 1Year 1Year 2Year 2Year 3Year 3

Code: 3ES501

Literature

This module will provide you with the skills of literary criticism required for the analysis of texts. These critical skills will be applied to a variety of literary forms, including poetry, novels, and short stories, from a range of historical periods. The module will also look at drama, including an in-depth study of a Shakespeare play.
20 Credits
core
Practical
Coursework

Code: 3HU502

Study Skills

This module will introduce you to the academic skills needed for study at undergraduate level, and enable you to plan for both your future study and your career. The focus of the module is developing the analytical and critical skills essential to studying humanities and social science subjects at degree level.
20 Credits
core
Coursework

Code: 3HU503

Creative Project

This module allows students to contribute collectively and severally to the design, development and production of a creative project that is relevant to Humanities, Journalism, or the creative and cultural industries more generally. Typically students will spend the first weeks of the module developing and discussing their ideas and negotiating with their tutor(s) about the nature, content, and scope of their chosen project.

Students will then work in groups and individually on aspects of the project, including tasks such as research, writing, designing, illustrating, editing, publishing or posting online of the creative output they have worked upon. Toward the end of the module students and tutors will work together to complete and finalise the output(s), while tutors will support students to reflect and write about the experience, and the learning they have derived from it.

More information
20 Credits
core
Practical
Coursework

Code: 3HY501

History

This module introduces you to the key methodologies used by historians to understand and explore the past. Using British History 1870-1914 as a particular focus the module explores the primary sources, historiographical debates, and approaches used by historians in order to understand this period. The module is designed to help you develop key research skills, critical thinking skills, and the ability to create a persuasive argument.
20 Credits
core
Practical
Coursework

Code: 2MO500

English

This is a level 2 module. The module is oriented towards providing students with sufficient English skills to enable them to engage confidently with level 4 modules.
20 Credits
optional
Coursework

Code: 2MO501

Mathematics

The course is equivalent to GCSE Maths and covers statistics and probability, number work, geometry, and algebra and graphs.
20 Credits
optional
Exam
Coursework

Code: 3HU504

Culture and Ideas

This wide-ranging module introduces and explains the cultural, philosophical, artistic and historical evolution and development of society over approximately the last 3,000 years.

Focusing principally on western Europe from ancient Egypt, Greece and Rome to the present day, but encompassing a range of world civilisations, religions and philosophies, the module’s teaching will give students a clear framework and contextual understanding of some of the main trends, developments and historical concepts that collectively underpin the values, mores and ethics of modern society, as well as giving students a general foundational understanding of the political, artistic, cultural and historical trends that are important for an understanding of today’s world

 

More information
20 Credits
optional
Coursework

Code: 3PO501

Political Studies

This module will introduce you to a range of key issues and approaches taken in the study of Politics at undergraduate level. Understanding Politics as the study of competing interests within society, the module addresses questions such as the differences between - and the different forms taken by - democratic, totalitarian and theocratic political systems; the relationships between foreign and domestic policy; and the influence of economics on political debate and decision-making. As well as introducing you to key debates and approaches, the module will also encourage you to develop the critical thinking, writing and analytical skills you will need to study Politics at degree-level.
20 Credits
optional
Practical
Coursework

Code: 4ES500

Theorising Literature and Meaning (PDP)

This module aims to introduce some of the fundamental concepts of literary criticism, enabling you to put these into practice in the analysis of texts. It will encourage the critical examination of seemingly ‘natural’ assumptions about the nature of language, of meaning, and of interpretation.

It will also acquaint you with the methodology and terminology which underpins current critical practices while building your analytical skills. Through this focus on skills the module will encourage you to reflect on your personal development, and to begin the process of linking your academic studies to your future goals. Assessment is by two pieces of coursework.

More information
20 Credits
core
Coursework

Code: 4ES502

Enlightenment Literature

This module builds a critical understanding of literature from the Enlightenment era. You will examine a selection of English and European texts that will allow you to explore the major narrative genres of poetry, drama, fiction, and prose. In the course of the module, you will study the modes of narrative transmission of the period and identify a range of formal features, such as point of view, characterisation, and setting.

You will also study some of the major literary trends, for example, epistolary writing, neoclassicism, sensibility, and satire, as well as literary representations of the period’s concerns and issues, such as education, science, industrial progression, and feminism. You will engage with ideas from the major philosophical thinkers of the Enlightenment era. Assessment is by coursework and seminar participation, including a presentation and engagement in discussion.

 

More information
20 Credits
core
Practical
Coursework

Code: 4ES505

Key Concepts in Linguistics

This module introduces key analytical models and methods in linguistics, providing you with the concepts and terminology for describing language from the smallest sound segments through word formation, to phrase structure and sentence structure. You will learn to use this terminology with precision, as well as looking at examples of language which present difficulties for analysis.

This will enable you to practise a key research procedure in linguistics, which is to hypothesise, test and look for counter examples as a way of improving on existing models and theories of language. In addition to learning to describe the phonology and syntax of English, you will learn about approaches to word meaning and language in use, and you will practise using these approaches to analyse examples of naturally occurring speech.

More information
20 Credits
core
Coursework

Code: 4ES506

The English Language in History (PDP)

On this module, you will be given a contextualised overview of the history of the English language. You will be encouraged to consider the processes and mechanisms by which the language has changed and evolved, and the many factors which have influenced it.

You will draw on skills acquired in the module Key Concepts in Linguistics in a focus on changes at all levels of language. You will continue to review your personal development by reflecting on skills specific to the study of language.

More information
20 Credits
core
Coursework

Code: 4ES507

Style: Language and Literature

This module draws on the descriptive and analytical skills you have acquired in the module Key Concepts in Linguistics, using the terms and concepts to describe, analyse and consider the effect of linguistic forms in a range of literary and non-literary texts.

You will work through the complexities of written texts, considering their structures and contexts as well as alternative analyses and interpretations, and you will explore the similarities and differences between the literary and the non-literary.

More information
20 Credits
core
Practical
Coursework

Code: 4ES509

Shakespeare and Early Modernity

The English Literary Renaissance, in the context of the spiritual and cultural upheaval of the Reformation and the development of Humanism, produced some of the most significant achievements in English literature. This module will introduce you to a range of drama, poetry and prose from this critical and tumultuous period. We will study the sonnet form as well as the dramatic innovations of late Elizabethan comedy and tragedy. In this way, some key works by Shakespeare will be considered alongside those of other influential poets, dramatists and prose stylists of his age. Assessment is by two coursework essays.
20 Credits
core
Coursework

Code: 5ES502

Literature, Identity and The Real

This module will introduce you to some of the key figures and concepts which inform current critical practice, and acquaint you with the terminology and discourses which constitute that practice.

The focus is upon poststructuralist approaches to literature and culture, and we will thus be discussing ideas which have developed from linguistics, psychoanalysis, Marxism, postmodernism, gender studies and post-colonialism, in relation to specific textual examples. We will also consider subsequent developments ‘post-Theory’. Assessment is by two coursework essays.

More information
20 Credits
core
Coursework

Code: 5ES509

Pragmatics and Literature

On this module you will build on the first-year module Style: Language and Literature, using a cognitive pragmatic theory - relevance theory - to think about the way that we process and interpret literary and non-literary texts beyond the level of linguistic decoding.

You will consider the various levels of context which influence the way we use language and make inferences about other people’s language use, and you will be encouraged to compare the theoretical model presented here with other accounts of language in communicative acts.

More information
20 Credits
core
Coursework

Code: 5ES510

Investigating English Language (PDP)

This module offers you the opportunity to conduct an investigative group project on a topic in linguistics and to present your results to a professional level. You will work in a small group to plan your project, research existing work in the area you have chosen, carry out the research and present your findings in poster format at a student conference with questions and discussion with other students, tutors, and assessors.

Your research might involve recording naturally-occurring spoken language, collecting written data and/or setting up and carrying out linguistic experiments.

More information
20 Credits
core
Practical
Coursework

Code: 5ED502

Education in Context: a reflection

The placement (12 days/72 hours) aims to offer you an opportunity to develop an appreciation of an educational setting and the working practices of professionals who work in the education sector. You will also begin to reflect on your own professional identity and profile in context.

This module will allow you the prospect of reflecting on theories studied throughout your programme, the application of these theories and policies in a practical setting. You will have the chance to develop the transferable skills of professionalism, communication, time management, organisation, and interpersonal relations.

During this module you will have the opportunity to think critically about your placement context and to explore educational topics relating to that setting. These key questions will help you develop and refine your own philosophy of education and inform your own career pathway.

More information
20 Credits
optional
Coursework

Code: 5ED516

An Introduction to Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages

This module is for students who are interested in developing an understanding of the practice of Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages.

It will explore the basics of language acquisition theory and popular methodology while inviting students to practise the methods, procedures and techniques used in the language classroom. Students will also develop an awareness of the English language and aspects of grammar, lexis and phonology.

More information
20 Credits
optional
Coursework

Code: 5ED525

Introduction to the Teaching of English Language and Literature

This 20 credit, level 5 module supports those interested in investigating how English Language and Literature are taught across different phases of education. By introducing the different contexts in which English Language and Literature can be taught, the module aims to provide an insight into the key drivers and influencing factors on the taught English curriculum in early years, primary, secondary and further education settings.

Completing work experience with an external organisation teaching English Language and/or Literature to learners, for a minimum of 30 hours, you will reflect upon the strategies used in professional practice and how these enable learners to make progress and meet national requirements and standards in English.

More information
20 Credits
optional
Practical
Coursework

Code: 5ES503

Modernism

This module will address the seismic cultural changes which have been drawn together under the umbrella term of ‘Modernism’. Roughly corresponding to the period from the late nineteenth century to the Second World War, Modernism embodied a decisive change in approaches to literature: modernist novelists such as Virginia Woolf and James Joyce moved away from realist narrative conventions and experimented with form; Modernist poets such as T. S. Eliot and Ezra Pound introduced a fragmented and allusive style of poetry whose impact remains significant today. In the course of this module, you will study some significant modernist writings in their intellectual and historical contexts; we will also look at parallel developments in psychoanalysis, anthropology and visual art as well as the polemical statements of the avant-gardistes. Assessment is by coursework and seminar participation, including a presentation and engagement in discussion.
20 Credits
optional
Coursework

Code: 5ES504

Nineteenth-Century Realism: Conscience and Context

This module is an exploration of the British and European realist novel in the nineteenth century. You will study a selection of key texts and consider their wider cultural and socio/historical themes and issues. In the course of the module, you will also examine the narrative modes and generic conventions relating to realism. Assessment is by coursework and seminar participation, including a presentation and engagement in discussion.

 

 

More information
20 Credits
optional
Practical
Coursework

Code: 5ES505

Poetry and Revolution in the British Romantic Period

The Romantic era in British Literature – approximately the half century between 1780 and 1830 – was an especially rich one in the history of British poetry as well as being a period of great historical change and artistic innovation. This module aims to familiarise you with the key achievements of a number of important late-eighteenth and early-nineteenth century British poets.

The period was one of social and political upheaval, as a consequence of (for example) the impact of the French Revolution and the long war with revolutionary, and then Napoleonic, France; the agitation for Parliamentary reform and political rights; the movement to abolish the slave trade and slavery in the British colonies; and the processes of industrialisation, commercialisation and urbanisation. We will aim to acquire a working knowledge of the relevant historical and cultural contexts in order to enrich our understanding of the poetry. Assessment is by one piece of coursework.

More information
20 Credits
optional
Coursework

Code: 5ES506

Theatricality and Madness

This module aims to focus on one particular theme, representations of madness, in selected contemporary plays. The module is premised upon the idea that theatricality and madness meet within the area of ‘performance’.

It will explore the notion of madness as it is portrayed dramatically, in terms of individual psychology, sexual conflict, social and political manipulation. In parallel, it will consider the theatrical aspects of madness suggested by such words as mask, persona, utterance; dissembling and concealment; violence and discovery. The module is assessed by two coursework essays.

More information
20 Credits
optional
Coursework

Code: 5ES511

Language and Society: Sociolinguistics

On this module, you will be introduced to the theories and models of variationist linguistics. You will consider the factors that influence language variation, and you will learn to use the methodologies that have been developed to observe, analyse and interpret it. There will be a particular focus on regional and social variation as well as contemporary varieties of English.
20 Credits
optional
Practical
Coursework

Code: 5ES512

The Concept of Literacy

On this module, you will be introduced to ideas and theories around the concept of literacy. You will consider the nature and emergence of literacy, the relationship between orality and literacy, between literacy and language standardisation, and between literacy and technology.

You will also consider the impact of literacy on education, cognition, communication, and culture. You will encounter and engage with conflicting arguments about literacy and you will be encouraged to enter into discussion and debates around these ideas.

 

More information
20 Credits
optional
Practical
Coursework

Code: 5ES513

Ideology, Discourse, and Power

This module will introduce you to a body of work which argues that that language and discourse interact with ideology, shaping our experiences and identities, representing events in certain ways, empowering certain groups and disempowering others, and reflecting, constituting and reinforcing existing hierarchies.

On the module, you will be shown how these approaches work by applying theoretical material and analytical models to examples of language in use in interpersonal, social, media and institutional settings.

More information
20 Credits
optional
Coursework

Code: 5HY509

Contemporary Issues in the Creative and Cultural Industries

This module will give you an opportunity to experience what it is like to work in the creative and cultural industries. Working closely with an external organisation or business in the creative and cultural industries for a minimum of 30 hours, you will consider real-life challenges facing the organisation and collaboratively devise a solution for these challenges, applying the academic and transferable skills you have acquired in a real-world situation.

You will be part of a small group, conducting research into the organisation, considering the needs of various stakeholders and thinking about how these can be balanced against each other in finding a solution to the challenge you have been presented with. In the end, you will present the solution you have devised to a panel of experts in a professional pitch.

More information
20 Credits
optional
Practical
Coursework

Code: 6ED536

Preparing to Teach English Language and Literature

This 20 credit, level 6 module builds on the content and acquired knowledge from the level 5, Introduction to the Teaching of English module. The module explores why English is so important in the taught curriculum and this module is designed to introduce English undergraduates to opportunities to become specialist practitioners in their discipline.

You will consider and apply the key elements of planning, choosing resources, identifying appropriate, inclusive teaching strategies and utilising basic assessment methods as part of a practical teaching activity. This will be married with a clear understanding of the personal, social, cultural and educational factors which influence learners’ language acquisition.

More information
20 Credits
optional
Practical
Coursework

Code: 6ES500

After The Modern: Existentialism and Postmodernism

This module will examine the legacies of modernism, with particular reference to the French philosophical and literary movement known as Existentialism and the subsequent development of postmodernism.

In relation to a diverse range of innovative and subversive works of literature, we will consider in depth existentialist notions of responsibility, bad faith, freedom and the absurd as well as postmodern ideas concerning the fictional nature of ‘reality’.  Therefore, as well as engaging with major British, European and American writers of the twentieth century, we will consider concurrent developments in film, visual art, theory and philosophy. Assessment is by coursework and seminar participation, including a presentation and engagement in discussion. 

More information
20 Credits
optional
Practical
Coursework

Code: 6ES502

Colonialism and Independence

The module aims to explore the effects of colonialism and independence on both the coloniser and the colonised through the study of literary texts and post-colonial theoretical debate. It will concentrate on modes of representation, and will concern itself with the interdependent images of the colonial encounter at moments on both sides of the advent of independence.

A range of concepts including the colonial encounter, creolisation, and hybridity will be discussed. Attention will be paid primarily o the British colonial (ad-venture) in India, Africa,and the Caribbean. The broad historical-geographical base is intended to enable you to examine and apply theories concerning representation and the post-colonial condition in a comparative way. Again, the deliberate emphasis on responses from both sides of a single colonial encounter is intended to enable you to probe more deeply the complex ways in which personal, cultural and national identity are created or undermined for both parties.

More information
20 Credits
optional
Coursework

Code: 6ES506

Gender and Identity in Contemporary Literature

This module aims to introduce you to a selection of contemporary texts dealing with the complex problematics of identity and, more specifically, its unique relationship to gender. You will also study key developments in form and current critical and theoretical and contextual debates surrounding the subject. Assessment is by coursework and seminar participation, including a presentation and engagement in discussion.
20 Credits
optional
Practical
Coursework

Code: 6ES507

Modern and Contemporary Poetry

In this module, you will read widely in modern and contemporary poetry in order to gain some understanding and appreciation of the range of poetry currently practised in the English speaking world. We will consider the way in which poetry evolves out of a conversation with other poems (tradition) out of a dialogue with other media, and out of a response to contemporary life and its philosophical traditions.

The module emphasises the close link between a careful and attuned reading and appreciative critical writing, and you will have opportunity through seminar discussions to familiarise yourself with the poetic techniques and formal effects that underpin modern experimental poetry.

At the same time, we will look at several ‘fixed’ poetic forms in this module, such as the sonnet, haiku, villanelle, pantoum, and sestina in order to consider the way contemporary poets continue to draw on the resources of the tradition. Assessment is by coursework and seminar participation, including a presentation and engagement in discussion.

More information
20 Credits
optional
Practical
Coursework

Code: 6ES510

Language and Mind: Psycholinguistics

The module will introduce and develop your understanding of a range of current approaches in the area of psycholinguistics. The module covers a range of psycholinguistic theories and models, and you will learn how these theories and models are developed and refined through evidence and experimental methodologies.
20 Credits
optional
Practical
Coursework

Code: 6ES511

Perspectives on Language and Literature

This module takes key concerns common to literary theory and literary linguistics, literary pragmatics and, to a lesser extent, cognitive psychology. The module examines the different approaches and considers the extent to which they overlap, conflict and/or inform one another.
20 Credits
optional
Coursework

Code: 6ES512

The Globalisation(s) of English

This module will introduce you to the diversity of varieties of English across the world. You will consider these varieties from a sociolinguistic perspective as well as learning about their histories and political and practical implications.
20 Credits
optional
Practical
Coursework

Code: 6ES513

Language and Identity

On this module you will use theories and methods from sociolinguistics and critical discourse analysis to explore the relationship between language and identity, considering the linguistic representation and construction of identities.
20 Credits
optional
Coursework

Code: 6ES515

Tragedy

Often regarded as the most profound of literary genres, tragedy stages conflicts between desire and law, individuals and institutions, human beings and inhuman demands. Beginning in Ancient Greece, the form evolved significantly during the Renaissance and is synonymous with Shakespeare’s greatest works.

This module will examine tragedy and the tragic in plays from Classical Greece and Renaissance England, taking in some of Shakespeare’s major tragedies as well as the bloody revenge dramas of the Jacobean age. It will address, too, the rich critical and theoretical heritage which has grown out of a recurrent and widespread fascination with this bleak, often grim, but compelling and cathartic genre. Assessment is by a negotiated project involving close analysis of the texts studied.

More information
20 Credits
optional
Coursework

Code: 6ES996

English Independent Study (PDP)

This double module, extending over two semesters, aims to facilitate your undertaking a piece of independently researched work, on a subject area generated by you in negotiation with a designated supervisor. The topic will be theoretically-based, in depth, and will extend your understanding, skills, and analyses developed through the first two years of the programme.

Your approach in terms of research methodology, theoretical basis and level of engagement will reflect the increased intellectual sophistication of the subject at Level Six. The varying skills accrued in this module will prove essential to your future employability and personal development, as well as providing an excellent framework for Postgraduate study. Assessment is by extended dissertation.

More information
40 Credits
optional
Coursework

Code: 6HY508

Work-Based Learning

This module provides you with an opportunity to experience working in a cultural, creative, arts, heritage or related organisation and to develop valuable academic and transferable skills.

The main focus is to negotiate and conduct a work-based project with an employer or other outside body. This might be a museum or gallery, a cinema or theatre, a radio or TV station, or an educational establishment, for example. It allows you to bring your academic skills to an organisation, to complete a project that would be useful to them (and, in many cases, the wider community), and gives you the opportunity to gain valuable work experience relevant to your chosen career path.

More information
40 Credits
optional
Coursework

Please note that our modules are subject to change - we review the content of our courses regularly, making changes where necessary to improve your experience and graduate prospects.

Side-on black and white portrait of a young student looking to the sky for inspiration with bokeh lights

Open Days

Register your interest for a future Open Day and we'll be in touch as soon as we are able to welcome you on campus.

Register nowRegister now

How you will learn

During your foundation year you will be assessed mainly by coursework, and with some in-class tests.

For the rest of your degree our assessment strategy is designed to produce confident, articulate graduates and we also place great emphasis on developing your research skills, with independent projects playing a key part in stages two and three.

Who will you meet

You will be taught by our team of engaging, passionate and inspiring subject experts.

Dr Robin Sims is the Programme Leader for BA (Hons) English and the Subject Leader for Joint Honours English. He studied English and American Literature at the University of East Anglia before completing a Masters and PhD at Cardiff University’s Centre for Critical and Cultural Theory. His specialisms include literary theory, modernism and postmodernism, and he has published on psychoanalytic approaches to literature and on the construction of the Green Man in twentieth-century culture.

Professor Samuel Kasule is a Professor of Post-colonial Theatre and Performance. He studied Drama and English at Makerere University (Kampala) before completing an MA in Theatre Studies and a PhD in English at Leeds University. His specialisms include drama, postcolonial literatures and postcolonial theory. He has published on Black British theatre, postcolonial writing, and postcolonial performance and drama.

Dr Barbara MacMahon is a Senior Lecturer in English Language. She completed a Masters and PhD at the Programme in Literary Linguistics, University of Strathclyde. Her main research interest is in literary linguistics, with further interests in cognitive pragmatics and psycholinguistics. One aspect of her current research uses the notion of metarepresentation to understand the layering of voices in narrative. The other uses pragmatic and psycholinguistic models to consider the role of sound-patterning in poetry.

Jennifer Marshall is interested in all aspects of international education. She specialises in English language and TESOL. She researches and publishes on educational policy and international education. Recent publications include:(2016) Meeting the needs of ESOL and EAL learners: A critical discussion of policy, in O’Grady, A. & Cottle, V. (eds) (2016) Exploring Education: A Masterly Enquiry, Abingdon: Routledge; (2015) The United States, Latin America, immigration and education, in Brown, M.A. (ed); (2015)  Migration and the education of young people 0-19,Abingdon: Routledge; (2014) Is txt spk killing the English language? In, Nijjar, B., Winder, N. & Muir, K. (2014) Edexcel International GCSE English as a Second Language, (2ndEdition), London: Edexcel Pearson; (2014) An Introduction to Comparative and International Education, London: Sage

Dr Paul Whickman is a Lecturer in English. He was awarded a PhD from the University of Nottingham in 2013. He specialises in eighteenth and nineteenth-century literature, particularly the Romantic period and the work of Percy Bysshe Shelley. Having published on Byron and Shelley, Paul’s particular research interests are in literary blasphemy, eighteenth-century conceptions of press freedom, copyright and the aesthetics of dissent.

Dr Aled Williams is a Senior Lecturer in English. He was awarded a PhD in English at the University of Warwick in 2001. His specialisms include Romanticism, nineteenth-century literature, and modern and contemporary poetry. He has published on Romantic-period literature, contemporary poetry, and on student writing development in higher education.

Personal academic tutoring

Your personal academic tutor will work with you to help you get the most out of your time at university. Having someone to talk to about your academic progress, your university experience and your professional aspirations is hugely valuable. We want you to feel challenged in your studies, stretched but confident to achieve your academic and professional goals.

Find out more about personal academic tutoring

Who will teach you

Robin Sims

Dr Robin Sims
Programme leader

Programme Leader

View full staff profileView full staff profile

Entry requirements

September 2020 typical entry requirements

RequirementWhat we're looking for
UCAS points72 (up to 16 from AS-levels)
Specific requirements at A-levelN/A
Specific requirements at GCSE

GCSE Maths and English are preferred, however if you don't have these qualifications you will be able to undertake Maths and English at L2 as part of your course of study.

IELTS6.0 (with 5.5 in each skills area)
Interview / AuditionN/A
PortfolioN/A

Alternative entry qualifications:

We usually consider an A-level in General Studies as a supplementary qualification. A good application/performance will be taken into account if you do not meet the criteria/offer conditions.

Our entry requirements for this course should be read together with the University's general entry requirements, which details subjects we accept, alternative qualifications and what we're looking for at Derby.

Fees and funding

2020/21 Fees

 Full-timePart-time
UK

£9,250 per year*

N/A

International

N/A

N/A

* The fees stated above are for the 2019/20 academic year; fees for 2020/21 have not yet been confirmed by the UK government. We will update this information as soon as it is available.

Further information about our fees and support you may be entitled to.

Additional costs and optional extras

How to apply

UK students

Full-time students applying to start in September should apply for this course through UCAS or you can apply directly to the University for an undergraduate course if you’re not applying to any other UK university in the same year.

Apply through UCASApply directly to the University

Careers

Wide-ranging career options

This degree will prepare you for a variety of careers, including teaching and academia, marketing, publishing, journalism, broadcasting, human resources, arts management, creative industries and the Civil Service. It will also provide an excellent foundation for further study at postgraduate level.

The optional TESOL pathway also opens up a range of career opportunities for you. You will be able to seek employment teaching English to speakers of other languages in the UK or internationally. This degree will also prepare you with the skills and knowledge that you will need to pursue postgraduate study.

If you would like to train to be a teacher, you can apply to study our PGCE Primary with QTS, PGCE Secondary (School Direct) with QTS, or PGCE Post-14.

Ensuring you are ‘work-ready’

Our Careers and Employment Service delivers support from day one of your course to ensure that you leave Derby as a ‘work-ready’ graduate - industry aware, motivated and enterprising. Throughout your studies, you will also benefit from our Personal Development Planning (PDP) scheme which enables you to reflect on your learning and refine your career ambitions.

The support continues once you have completed your course too: you are entitled to further help and guidance from the Careers and Employment Service for up to three years after leaving the University

Contact us

   
EnquiryEmailPhone

If you need any more information from us, eg on courses, accommodation, applying, car parking, fees or funding, please contact us and we will do everything we can to help you.

Contact us Contact us

Additional information about your studies

Download programme specification

Teaching hours

Like most universities, we operate extended teaching hours at the University of Derby, so contact time with your lecturers and tutors could be anytime between 9am and 9pm. Your timetable will usually be available on the website 24 hours after enrolment on to your course.

Additional costs and optional extras

We’re committed to providing you with an outstanding learning experience. Our expert teaching, excellent facilities and great employability prepare you for your future career. As part of our commitment to you we aim to keep any additional study costs to a minimum. However, there are occasions where students may incur some additional costs.

Included in your fees

Mandatory costs not included in your fees

Optional costs not included in your fees

Please note: Our courses are refreshed and updated on a regular basis. If you are thinking about transferring onto this course (into the second year for example), you should contact the programme leader for the relevant course information as modules may vary from those shown on this page.

Discover Uni

You might also like