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Course details

Study options

Full-time: 4 years

UK/EU fee

£9,250 per year* (2020/21)

International fee

£14,045 per year (2020/21)

UCAS points

128 (September 2020 entry)

UCAS code

Q305

Course level

Undergraduate

Qualification

(MLit)

Start date

September

Location

Kedleston Road, Derby Campus

Course description

Why you should study English at the University of Derby

In 1821 Percy Bysshe Shelley wrote that ‘poets are the unacknowledged legislators of the world’. A century on, Ezra Pound described artists as the ‘antennae of the race’. Literature is provocative, challenging, unsettling and transformational; it exposes us to new perspectives and undermines existing certainties. At the University of Derby, we believe that the study of literature should do this too.

What is an Integrated Masters?

The Integrated Masters takes you on a journey through undergraduate to masters level learning, giving you greater opportunity to develop advanced research skills and specialist knowledge. The masters level modules build directly on those taken at earlier stages, meaning that you will benefit from a coherent programme which builds logically toward the MLit award.

The Integrated Masters qualification will help you to stand out when seeking a graduate career.

It also offers an excellent way to fund additional study: you can secure a student loan which covers all four years of your full-time study.

A broad perspective

English at Derby is an exciting, diverse and challenging course that not only incorporates the close analysis of literature, but also considers the situations in which literature is produced and read. This means your studies will include the intellectual and cultural history of art, film, philosophy, linguistics and sociology, as well as contemporary cultural politics.

You will examine literatures from the sixteenth century to the present day; from Africa and the Caribbean, Asia, the USA and Europe. And you will cover subjects ranging from myth and fantasy through to crime, passion and madness.

At postgraduate level you can also investigate the nature and significance of offence and free speech, and the relationship between landscape and literature, while developing your understanding of literary representations of identity, eighteenth-century thought and the reactions it received in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries.

The flexibility of the course also means you can choose from a wide range of thought-provoking options so that you can focus on your own literary interests.

Inspirational teaching

You will be taught by an enthusiastic team with research expertise covering a broad range of literary interests. You will also benefit from guest seminars and lectures, including those given by our Visiting Professor, Catherine Belsey, an internationally-recognised scholar whose work has profoundly influenced the way English is studied and taught.

The ideal setting

You could not have a better backdrop to your studies than Derbyshire, a county which inspired many great writers including Jane Austen, Walter Scott, Charlotte Brontё, George Eliot and Henry James.

Derbyshire was one of the centres of the British Enlightenment during the eighteenth century. You will be introduced to this important heritage from the beginning of your course, taking Enlightenment Literature in your first semester. The postgraduate modules will then develop your understanding of this crucial period of Western cultural development and the literary responses to it.

A career focused degree

An English degree will open up a range of career options. However, we also recognise the importance of supporting you to develop the skills sought by employers to maximise your employability.

You will have personal development planning (PDP) interviews with your Year Tutor throughout your degree. Your tutor will help you explore career aspirations, review your PDP file and advise you on developing transferable skills.

We offer the opportunity for applied study through our work-based learning modules, which can be taken as options and give you experience of working with various cultural institutions. There is also a programme of employability workshops and talks.

Not just lectures and classrooms

You can broaden your experience through trips and study visits to cinemas, film festivals, theatres, museums, galleries and heritage centres where you can observe and also apply what you are learning in practice.

Study in America

You can choose to study part of your degree at one of our partner universities in America:

You can also study our three-year BA (Hons) English or our BA (Hons) English Literature and Language with optional TESOL pathway. You could also combine English with another subject - find out more about our joint honours degrees.

What you will study

Year 1Year 1Year 2Year 2Year 3Year 3Year 4Year 4

Code: 4ES500

Theorising Literature and Meaning (PDP)

This module aims to introduce some of the fundamental concepts of literary criticism, enabling you to put these into practice in the analysis of texts. It will encourage the critical examination of seemingly ‘natural’ assumptions about the nature of language, of meaning, and of interpretation.

It will also acquaint you with the methodology and terminology which underpins current critical practices while building your analytical skills. Through this focus on skills the module will encourage you to reflect on your personal development, and to begin the process of linking your academic studies to your future goals. Assessment is by two pieces of coursework.

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20 Credits
core
Coursework

Code: 4ES502

Enlightenment Literature

This module builds a critical understanding of literature from the Enlightenment era. You will examine a selection of English and European texts that will allow you to explore the major narrative genres of poetry, drama, fiction, and prose. In the course of the module, you will study the modes of narrative transmission of the period and identify a range of formal features, such as point of view, characterisation, and setting.

You will also study some of the major literary trends, for example, epistolary writing, neoclassicism, sensibility, and satire, as well as literary representations of the period’s concerns and issues, such as education, science, industrial progression, and feminism. You will engage with ideas from the major philosophical thinkers of the Enlightenment era. Assessment is by coursework and seminar participation, including a presentation and engagement in discussion.

 

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20 Credits
core
Practical
Coursework

Code: 4ES503

Mutants and Monsters: Interpreting Fantasy

Focusing on the genres of the gothic, horror and science fiction, this module will explore representations of nonhuman ‘others’ in the literature and cinema of the fantastic.

In examining this perennially popular area of culture, we will consider the ways in which cultural anxieties concerning the mind, the body, gender, race and technology are articulated in fantasy; we will also investigate the ways in which ideas of what constitutes the human have continually changed, and the ways in which these changes have been represented in fiction. From ghosts and vampires to cyborgs and aliens, we will consider a range of texts in the light of theoretical models drawn from such fields as psychoanalysis, postcolonialism and posthumanism. Assessment is by coursework and seminar participation, including a presentation and engagement in discussion.

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20 Credits
core
Practical
Coursework

Code: 4ES508

Love and Loss in the English Lyric

This module will focus on the themes of love and loss in post-Romantic English short-form poetry (from the 1850s to the present). The theme of love can encompass the desire for another person or object, the devotion to an ideal, the commitment to friendship or community, the love of language, and longing for union with nature. Loss might include the absence of a beloved, the feeling of abandonment or loneliness, the sense of disconnection with the natural world, the loss of creative inspiration, and the emptying out of a secure sense of self.

As we read we will pay attention to the mechanics of poetry--the fundamentals of formal design, visual shape, and acoustic effects—in order to acquaint ourselves with the techniques and the conceptual vocabulary specific to the creation and appreciation of poetry as a genre. We will focus on ‘modern’ poetry but we will frequently look backwards to the long poetic tradition—to Old English elegies, to Renaissance songs and sonnets, and to Romantic odes—to acquaint ourselves with the rich tradition out of which poems arise.

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20 Credits
core
Practical
Coursework

Code: 4ES509

Shakespeare and Early Modernity

The English Literary Renaissance, in the context of the spiritual and cultural upheaval of the Reformation and the development of Humanism, produced some of the most significant achievements in English literature. This module will introduce you to a range of drama, poetry and prose from this critical and tumultuous period. We will study the sonnet form as well as the dramatic innovations of late Elizabethan comedy and tragedy. In this way, some key works by Shakespeare will be considered alongside those of other influential poets, dramatists and prose stylists of his age. Assessment is by two coursework essays.
20 Credits
core
Coursework

Code: 4ES510

World Literatures in English

World Literatures in English is a transnational and cross-period module that will introduce you to important works of fiction, poetry and drama from across the globe, including texts written originally in English and some in translation.

In addition to literature of the Americas, a range of writings by authors of formerly colonised and enslaved communities in areas such as Africa, Australia, India, and the Caribbean will be examined in relation to colonisation, slavery and the changing historical and cultural context of migration. We will also consider the effects of postmodernism and globalisation with reference to contemporary fictions, including potentially those of the far East. The study of world literature is itself contested ground, and the resultant tensions between the local and the global, the national and the transnational, will be explored. Assessment is by two coursework essays.

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20 Credits
core
Coursework

Code: 5ES502

Literature, Identity and The Real

This module will introduce you to some of the key figures and concepts which inform current critical practice, and acquaint you with the terminology and discourses which constitute that practice.

The focus is upon poststructuralist approaches to literature and culture, and we will thus be discussing ideas which have developed from linguistics, psychoanalysis, Marxism, postmodernism, gender studies and post-colonialism, in relation to specific textual examples. We will also consider subsequent developments ‘post-Theory’. Assessment is by two coursework essays.

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20 Credits
core
Coursework

Code: 5ES504

Nineteenth-Century Realism: Conscience and Context

This module is an exploration of the British and European realist novel in the nineteenth century. You will study a selection of key texts and consider their wider cultural and socio/historical themes and issues. In the course of the module, you will also examine the narrative modes and generic conventions relating to realism. Assessment is by coursework and seminar participation, including a presentation and engagement in discussion.

 

 

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20 Credits
core
Practical
Coursework

Code: 5ES508

Literature in Society: The English Conference (PDP)

This module will enable you to undertake a piece of collaborative research, culminating in the writing and delivery of a conference paper. You will contribute to the publicity for the conference through a variety of formats, which may include posters, leaflets, and websites.

The module will develop your research skills as well as highlighting other essential transferable skills, such as team work and public speaking ability, thus enhancing your employability. The module will also require you to reflect on your own personal development.

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20 Credits
core
Practical
Coursework

Code: 5ED525

Introduction to the Teaching of English Language and Literature

This 20 credit, level 5 module supports those interested in investigating how English Language and Literature are taught across different phases of education. By introducing the different contexts in which English Language and Literature can be taught, the module aims to provide an insight into the key drivers and influencing factors on the taught English curriculum in early years, primary, secondary and further education settings.

Completing work experience with an external organisation teaching English Language and/or Literature to learners, for a minimum of 30 hours, you will reflect upon the strategies used in professional practice and how these enable learners to make progress and meet national requirements and standards in English.

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20 Credits
optional
Practical
Coursework

Code: 5ES503

Modernism

This module will address the seismic cultural changes which have been drawn together under the umbrella term of ‘Modernism’. Roughly corresponding to the period from the late nineteenth century to the Second World War, Modernism embodied a decisive change in approaches to literature: modernist novelists such as Virginia Woolf and James Joyce moved away from realist narrative conventions and experimented with form; Modernist poets such as T. S. Eliot and Ezra Pound introduced a fragmented and allusive style of poetry whose impact remains significant today. In the course of this module, you will study some significant modernist writings in their intellectual and historical contexts; we will also look at parallel developments in psychoanalysis, anthropology and visual art as well as the polemical statements of the avant-gardistes. Assessment is by coursework and seminar participation, including a presentation and engagement in discussion.
20 Credits
optional
Coursework

Code: 5ES505

Poetry and Revolution in the British Romantic Period

The Romantic era in British Literature – approximately the half century between 1780 and 1830 – was an especially rich one in the history of British poetry as well as being a period of great historical change and artistic innovation. This module aims to familiarise you with the key achievements of a number of important late-eighteenth and early-nineteenth century British poets.

The period was one of social and political upheaval, as a consequence of (for example) the impact of the French Revolution and the long war with revolutionary, and then Napoleonic, France; the agitation for Parliamentary reform and political rights; the movement to abolish the slave trade and slavery in the British colonies; and the processes of industrialisation, commercialisation and urbanisation. We will aim to acquire a working knowledge of the relevant historical and cultural contexts in order to enrich our understanding of the poetry. Assessment is by one piece of coursework.

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20 Credits
optional
Coursework

Code: 5ES506

Theatricality and Madness

This module aims to focus on one particular theme, representations of madness, in selected contemporary plays. The module is premised upon the idea that theatricality and madness meet within the area of ‘performance’.

It will explore the notion of madness as it is portrayed dramatically, in terms of individual psychology, sexual conflict, social and political manipulation. In parallel, it will consider the theatrical aspects of madness suggested by such words as mask, persona, utterance; dissembling and concealment; violence and discovery. The module is assessed by two coursework essays.

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20 Credits
optional
Coursework

Code: 5HY509

Contemporary Issues in the Creative and Cultural Industries

This module will give you an opportunity to experience what it is like to work in the creative and cultural industries. Working closely with an external organisation or business in the creative and cultural industries for a minimum of 30 hours, you will consider real-life challenges facing the organisation and collaboratively devise a solution for these challenges, applying the academic and transferable skills you have acquired in a real-world situation.

You will be part of a small group, conducting research into the organisation, considering the needs of various stakeholders and thinking about how these can be balanced against each other in finding a solution to the challenge you have been presented with. In the end, you will present the solution you have devised to a panel of experts in a professional pitch.

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20 Credits
optional
Practical
Coursework

Code: 7ES504

Research Methods (PDP)

This module will develop your research abilities, broadening your understanding of approaches to primary and secondary material, and of the range of sources which may be considered pertinent to a rigorous study of a given topic.

It will prepare you for your dissertation, as well as for doctoral research and a range of careers which utilise skills of qualitative and quantitative research. In addition to extending your practical skills in this area, it will entail philosophical and theoretical consideration of methodologies drawn upon by researchers in History and English.

Readings undertaken each week will form the basis of an interdisciplinary critical engagement with such issues as research ethics, approaches to written, oral, visual and material sources, comparison of quantitative and qualitative methods, the history of the book, the notion of the ‘archive’ and the importance of new technologies, both as research tools and as primary sources. Assessment is by two written pieces. 

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40 Credits
core
Coursework

Code: 7HY500

Enlightenment: The Ferment of Ideas

In this module, you will critically explore the eighteenth-century Enlightenment, which is often seen as an international intellectual revolution that marked the birth of the modern world. This interdisciplinary module focuses upon the relationship between ideas, culture and society across Britain, Europe, and the wider world.

It exploits the opportunities presented by rich historic collections in local museums, archives and the historic heritage of the region, including the Joseph Wright Collection at Derby Museum and Art Gallery, the Derwent Valley Mills and Lichfield museums. You will explore the origins of Enlightenment, the role of the sciences, the relationship between new ideas and the Industrial Revolution and the role of international Enlightenment networks including those across Europe, the Atlantic world and the European colonies.

The impact and development of ideas in different countries will be compared and you will critically consider whether there were essentially one or multiple enlightenments and assess how useful the concept of Enlightenment is as a movement, period and concept. Major trends in Enlightenment thought will be examined, including the impact of the sciences upon other intellectual endeavours, and new conceptions of knowledge, aesthetics and the self. 

The relationship between ideas, society, and material culture will be a major theme throughout the module as will interrogations of the political dimensions of Enlightenment including absolutism, exploitation and slavery and demands for political reforms in the second half of the eighteenth century. The module will examine the relationship between Enlightenment ideas and society by considering the impact of ideas upon gender, social class and different forms of sociability including print cultures, the urban public sphere, clubs, societies, freemasonry, and salons.

 

 

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20 Credits
core
Practical
Coursework

Code: 6ES500

After The Modern: Existentialism and Postmodernism

This module will examine the legacies of modernism, with particular reference to the French philosophical and literary movement known as Existentialism and the subsequent development of postmodernism.

In relation to a diverse range of innovative and subversive works of literature, we will consider in depth existentialist notions of responsibility, bad faith, freedom and the absurd as well as postmodern ideas concerning the fictional nature of ‘reality’.  Therefore, as well as engaging with major British, European and American writers of the twentieth century, we will consider concurrent developments in film, visual art, theory and philosophy. Assessment is by coursework and seminar participation, including a presentation and engagement in discussion. 

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20 Credits
optional
Practical
Coursework

Code: 6ES502

Colonialism and Independence

The module aims to explore the effects of colonialism and independence on both the coloniser and the colonised through the study of literary texts and post-colonial theoretical debate. It will concentrate on modes of representation, and will concern itself with the interdependent images of the colonial encounter at moments on both sides of the advent of independence.

A range of concepts including the colonial encounter, creolisation, and hybridity will be discussed. Attention will be paid primarily o the British colonial (ad-venture) in India, Africa,and the Caribbean. The broad historical-geographical base is intended to enable you to examine and apply theories concerning representation and the post-colonial condition in a comparative way. Again, the deliberate emphasis on responses from both sides of a single colonial encounter is intended to enable you to probe more deeply the complex ways in which personal, cultural and national identity are created or undermined for both parties.

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20 Credits
optional
Coursework

Code: 6ES506

Gender and Identity in Contemporary Literature

This module aims to introduce you to a selection of contemporary texts dealing with the complex problematics of identity and, more specifically, its unique relationship to gender. You will also study key developments in form and current critical and theoretical and contextual debates surrounding the subject. Assessment is by coursework and seminar participation, including a presentation and engagement in discussion.
20 Credits
optional
Practical
Coursework

Code: 6ES515

Tragedy

Often regarded as the most profound of literary genres, tragedy stages conflicts between desire and law, individuals and institutions, human beings and inhuman demands. Beginning in Ancient Greece, the form evolved significantly during the Renaissance and is synonymous with Shakespeare’s greatest works.

This module will examine tragedy and the tragic in plays from Classical Greece and Renaissance England, taking in some of Shakespeare’s major tragedies as well as the bloody revenge dramas of the Jacobean age. It will address, too, the rich critical and theoretical heritage which has grown out of a recurrent and widespread fascination with this bleak, often grim, but compelling and cathartic genre. Assessment is by a negotiated project involving close analysis of the texts studied.

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20 Credits
optional
Coursework

Code: 7ES501

Locations of Enlightenment

Following Jurgen Habermas’ view of the enlightenment as an ongoing or ‘unfinished’ project, this module considers a range of ‘locations’ (material, virtual and intellectual) in which language and writing have helped disseminate, negotiate and contest Enlightenment values such as rationality, progress, social engineering, utopianism, universality, cosmopolitanism, liberty, citizenship, and revolution.

Poetry, fiction, drama, popular songs, travel narratives, life writing, from a range of Enlightenment ‘locations’—such as eighteenth and nineteenth-century Scotland, the French and American Revolutions, the transatlantic utopian tradition, and the Enlightenment ideal of universal communication embodied or travestied today in the world wide web—will be read alongside readings from political, moral, economic and aesthetic philosophy from the eighteenth century to the present.

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20 Credits
core
Coursework

Code: 7ES502

Taking and Making Offence: Blasphemy, Obscenity and Censorship from Milton to Rushdie

This module focuses on freedom of speech, a key Enlightenment principle. In particular, it investigates and considers texts that have either been banned, otherwise deemed offensive, or their authors prosecuted or persecuted from the Seventeenth Century to the present day. Students have the opportunity to consider what it is that makes a text ‘offensive’ in a particular socio-historical context.

Questions will be asked as to the nature of taboos: are they simply social constructions serving to perpetuate a conservative socio-political order? In what way do social taboos – or conceptions of offence – serve as a way of enforcing cultural and thus socio-political conformity? Connected to this, this module will investigate what writers attempt to achieve with such works. Why risk prosecution or worse? Consideration will also be paid to the significance of aesthetics and the connection of this to subjective conceptions of offence. Assessment is by coursework and seminar participation, including a presentation and engagement in discussion.

 

 

 

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20 Credits
core
Practical
Coursework

Code: 7ES503

The Wilderness and the Imagination

Covering four centuries of transatlantic conceptualisation, this module examines the significance of the wilderness both as an imagined space and as the subject of ecological concern and action.

It focuses on varied interpretations of, and engagements with, the natural world; on how landscapes have been “constructed” and so how representations of nature have functioned ideologically. In doing so, it will also explore the developing sense of ecological awareness, engaging with concepts such as radical ecology, ecofeminism and ecocriticism in the process. It will, therefore, introduce you to a range of critical approaches and encourage you to view these in context. Whilst you will study predominantly written primary texts – fiction, non-fiction and poetry – you will also explore visual representations from the world of fine art and film to enable interdisciplinary work to be undertaken.

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20 Credits
core
Practical
Coursework

Code: 7ES505

Global Literatures: Travel Writing

This module will introduce you to key texts about travel and place ranging from the colonial encounter to the present day as well as readings, discussion and writings dealing with critical responses to colonial representation.

Thematic concerns will include point of view, narrative choices, diasporic and post-colonial journeys, travel and gender, travel and colonialism, and post-colonial perspectives on travel writing. Questions to be evaluated will include: what is the role played by travel writing in the construction of the structures of colonial authority and resistance to such authority? What is the relationship between travel writing and various kinds of nationalisms? The module will look at the work of Homi Bhabha, on ‘in-between cultures’, Mary Louise Pratt’s ‘contact zones’ and Edward Said’s ‘overlapping territories’. In this module, too, there will be a discussion of de-centred narratives where postmodernity will be used as a device. Post-colonialism, in this module, which questions texts in terms of their possible Euro-centricity, will be seen to pre-date post-modernism because of its inception after colonialism.

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20 Credits
core
Practical
Coursework

Code: 7ES999

English Independent Study (MLit)

This module enables you to undertake a substantial piece of research on an aspect of literature and on the critical and theoretical debates which surround it. You will therefore need to show an advanced, critical engagement with theoretical ideas and to undertake critical of relevant sources.

The writing of the dissertation will enable you to develop your ability to construct sustained and coherent arguments, and to show a systematic and up-to-date understanding of relevant theoretical and methodological issues. The skills developed in this module are essential to your future employability and personal development, as well as providing a basis for doctoral study.

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40 Credits
core
Coursework

Code: 7HY505

Work-Based Learning (Integrated Masters)

This module provides you with an opportunity to apply your passion for history within the context of a cultural, creative, arts, heritage or related organisation and to develop advanced academic and transferable skills.

The main focus is to negotiate and conduct a substantial work-based project that will allow you to develop the expertise you can offer to an employer or other outside body and to acquire advanced project management skills. This might involve working with a museum or gallery, a cinema or theatre, a radio or TV station, or an educational establishment, for example.

It allows you to bring your academic skills to an organisation, to complete a project that would be useful to them (and, in many cases, the wider community), and gives you the opportunity to show initiative and leadership in an area relevant to your chosen career path. It will also encourage you to think creatively about how the past is being presented to different audiences.

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40 Credits
core
Coursework

Please note that our modules are subject to change - we review the content of our courses regularly, making changes where necessary to improve your experience and graduate prospects.

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How you will learn

Teaching and learning

You will learn through lectures, seminars and tutorials. You will be taught in interactive and varied ways, with plenty of opportunity for you to discuss and debate ideas, so your course stays stimulating and thought-provoking. You will be able to test your ideas, clarify points and develop arguments based on your reading of primary and secondary sources. This will help you to develop excellent communication skills, something that employers really value.

Real-world learning

You will have opportunities to undertake work-based learning projects and placements at cultural institutions as well as study visits to art galleries, cinemas, heritage centres, museums and theatres. We work closely, for instance, with the Derby-based 1623 Theatre Company, giving students the chance to try their hands at directing play scenes.

Assessment

Our assessment strategy is designed to produce confident, articulate graduates with a broad set of skills. There are no exams and forms of assessment include seminar debates, group presentations and conference papers alongside essays and longer research projects. We place great emphasis on developing your research skills, with independent projects playing a key part from the second year of the programme.

Supporting you all the way

We pride ourselves on being approachable and supportive. You will have a personal tutor to help and advise you throughout your degree, providing an exceptional level of support.

Who you will meet

You will be taught by our team of engaging, passionate and inspiring subject experts.

Dr Robin Sims is the Programme Leader for BA (Hons) English and the Subject Leader for Joint Honours English. He studied English and American Literature at the University of East Anglia before completing a Masters and PhD at Cardiff University’s Centre for Critical and Cultural Theory. His specialisms include literary theory, modernism and postmodernism, and he has published on psychoanalytic approaches to literature and on the construction of the Green Man in twentieth-century culture.

Dr David Holloway is a Senior Lecturer in American Studies. His research interests include American visual cultures, narratives of apocalypse in American culture and the “war on terror”. His book on Cormac McCarthy was published in 2002 and 9/11 and the War on Terror was published in 2008. He is also the co-editor of American Visual Cultures (2005).

Professor Samuel Kasule is a Professor of Post-colonial Theatre and Performance. He studied Drama and English at Makerere University (Kampala) before completing an MA in Theatre Studies and a PhD in English at Leeds University. His specialisms include drama, postcolonial literatures and postcolonial theory. He has published on Black British theatre, postcolonial writing, and postcolonial performance and drama.

Dr Paul Whickman is a Lecturer in English. He was awarded a PhD from the University of Nottingham in 2013. He specialises in eighteenth and nineteenth-century literature, particularly the Romantic period and the work of Percy Bysshe Shelley. Having published on Byron and Shelley, Paul’s particular research interests are in literary blasphemy, eighteenth-century conceptions of press freedom, copyright and the aesthetics of dissent.

Dr Aled Williams is a Senior Lecturer in English. He was awarded a PhD in English at the University of Warwick in 2001. His specialisms include Romanticism, nineteenth-century literature, and modern and contemporary poetry. He has published on Romantic-period literature, contemporary poetry, and on student writing development in higher education.

Personal academic tutoring

Your personal academic tutor will work with you to help you get the most out of your time at university. Having someone to talk to about your academic progress, your university experience and your professional aspirations is hugely valuable. We want you to feel challenged in your studies, stretched but confident to achieve your academic and professional goals.

Find out more about personal academic tutoring

Who will teach you

Robin Sims

Dr Robin Sims
Programme leader

Programme Leader

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Entry requirements

September 2020 typical entry requirements

RequirementWhat we're looking for
UCAS points128 (up to 16 from AS-levels)
Specific requirements at A-level

At least a C in English or similar at A-level (or equivalent qualification)

Specific requirements at GCSEGCSE Maths and English Grade C/Grade 4 (or above) or equivalent qualification
IELTS6.0 (with 5.5 in each skills area)
Interview / AuditionN/A
PortfolioN/A

Alternative entry qualifications

We usually consider an A-level in General Studies as a supplementary qualification. A good application/performance will be taken into account if you do not meet the criteria/offer conditions.

Our entry requirements for this course should be read together with the University's general entry requirements, which details subjects we accept, alternative qualifications and what we're looking for at Derby.

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Academic Achievement Scholarship

We’re offering eligible students a £1,000 scholarship to celebrate your hard work and success.

Learn more about the Academic Achievement ScholarshipLearn more about the Academic Achievement Scholarship

Fees and funding

2020/21 Fees

 Full-timePart-time
UK/EU

£9,250 per year*

N/A

International

£14,045 per year

N/A

* The fees stated above are for the 2019/20 academic year; fees for 2020/21 have not yet been confirmed by the UK government. We will update this information as soon as it is available.

Further information about our fees and support you may be entitled to.

Additional costs and optional extras

How to apply

UK/EU students

Full-time students applying to start in September should apply for this course through UCAS or you can apply directly to the University for an undergraduate course if you’re not applying to any other UK university in the same year.

Apply through UCASApply directly to the University

Guidance for EU students post-Brexit

International students

Full-time students applying to start in September should apply for this course through UCAS or you can apply directly to the University for an undergraduate course if you’re not applying to any other UK university in the same year.

Apply through UCASApply directly to the University

Guidance for international applicants applying for an undergraduate degree

Careers

A head start in your career

You will be equipped with the skills and knowledge you need to give you excellent career prospects when you graduate. There are exciting opportunities in fields such as teaching, publishing, journalism, human resources, arts management, broadcasting, the creative industries and the civil service.

Ensuring you are ‘work-ready’

Our Careers and Employment Service will provide you with support from day one of your course to ensure that you leave Derby as a ‘work-ready’ graduate - industry aware, motivated and enterprising. Throughout your studies, you will also benefit from our Personal Development Planning (PDP) scheme which enables you to reflect on your learning and develop your career ambitions.

This support continues once you’ve completed your course too: you are entitled to further help and guidance from the Careers and Employment Service for up to three years after leaving the University.

Contact us

If you need any more information from us, eg on courses, accommodation, applying, car parking, fees or funding, please contact us and we will do everything we can to help you.

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Additional information about your studies

Download programme specification

Teaching hours

Like most universities, we operate extended teaching hours at the University of Derby, so contact time with your lecturers and tutors could be anytime between 9am and 9pm. Your timetable will usually be available on the website 24 hours after enrolment on to your course.

Additional costs and optional extras

We’re committed to providing you with an outstanding learning experience. Our expert teaching, excellent facilities and great employability prepare you for your future career. As part of our commitment to you we aim to keep any additional study costs to a minimum. However, there are occasions where students may incur some additional costs.

Included in your fees

Mandatory costs not included in your fees

Optional costs not included in your fees

Please note: Our courses are refreshed and updated on a regular basis. If you are thinking about transferring onto this course (into the second year for example), you should contact the programme leader for the relevant course information as modules may vary from those shown on this page.

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