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Course details

Study options

Full-time: 3 years

UK/EU fee

£9,250 per year (2020/21)

International fee

£14,045 per year (2020/21)

UCAS points

112 (September 2020 entry)

UCAS code

ML93

Course level

Undergraduate

Qualification

BSc (Hons)

Start date

September

Location

One Friar Gate Square, Derby Campus

If you do not achieve the typical entry points required, you may want to consider studying this course with foundation year.

View with foundation year optionView with foundation year option

Course description

The highlights

Top 10Criminology at Derby**The Guardian University Guide 2020
2ndTeaching quality - Criminology at Derby**Times/Sunday Times 2019 University Guide
96%Overall satisfaction - Criminology at Derby**National Student Survey 2020

This course has opened up lots of career opportunities to me through volunteering placements, and has equipped me with valuable skills and qualities which I can take forward into my future career.

Millie Gackowska
BSc Criminology

Why Criminology?

Criminology is a fascinating academic discipline, opening up pathways into a wide range of careers where you can have a real impact on society. On this course, you’ll debate major philosophical ideas about retribution, rehabilitation and punishment, exploring why people commit crime, why laws are created and broken, the effectiveness of sentencing and punishment, and the impact of crime on victims, communities and wider society.

Bringing together disciplines such as sociology, law, psychology and philosophy, our BSc (Hons) Criminology encourages you to think creatively, challenge established beliefs and develop your own research interests. Our emphasis on problem-based learning means you will be well equipped to meet the real-world challenges of the justice and penal system in practice.

Throughout the degree, you’ll develop your investigative, management and communication skills with activities such as interviewing, negotiation, decision-making, research and argument.


Hands-on learning

You’ll be able to make direct links between complex theories of criminology and the day-to-day demands of working practice. Thanks to our strong professional partnerships with the police, probation service, prisons and other criminal justice agencies, there are exciting opportunities for you to apply your skills and knowledge to ‘real-world’ situations.

An extensive programme of study visits and fieldtrips will give you intriguing insights. These could include visits to courts, prisons, police forces and youth offender training centres. In the first year, you will also tour the National Justice Museum to give your learning a historical context.

There is endless variety and scope for practical projects: in the past our students have taken part in mock murder hunts, contributed to hate crime scrutiny panels, investigated miscarriages of justice, joined riot training with the constabulary, and observed how cases are taken from crime scene to courtroom.

Extra qualifications

If you have a particular interest in youth justice, our BSc (Hons) Criminology gives you the chance to achieve an additional professional qualification – the Youth Justice in Effective Practice Certificate (YJEPC) – alongside your degree studies.

The YJEPC is the most widely held qualification in youth justice: since it was launched in 2012, it has been adopted by over half of the Youth Offending Teams countrywide to improve the skills of their staff. Bringing together current theory, practice and evidence, it will not only boost your employability but also help you to make more effective judgements in your future career.

The opportunity to gain the YJEPC is available if you take two specific modules – Working with Young Offenders and Youth Justice.
Global thinking

International perspectives are an integral part of the BSc (Hons) Criminology – and we offer you the chance to witness how other countries approach criminal justice at first hand. We have previously hosted international debates with Criminology students from across the globe, and such experiences enrich your learning and help shape your future career.

A highlight of the course is the opportunity to visit America in your second year arranged with the help of US police departments and police academies. Past trips have seen our students investigate gang projects in Los Angeles, go on marine patrol with the City of Miami Police and contribute to arts projects at the San Quentin Prison in San Francisco.

In your third year, there is also the chance to go on a three-day study trip to The Hague, the legal capital of the world, where you could visit prisons, police academies and the International Criminal Court.


Expert teaching

You’ll learn from an award-winning teaching team which includes criminal psychologists, sociologists, experienced police officers and lawyers. Many are still actively engaged with practice, which helps you keep up to date with contemporary issues.

We pride ourselves on innovative and challenging teaching methods which are directly relevant to today’s graduate employment market. Our track record in delivering an outstanding learning experience was underlined when we won the 2017 National Award for Teaching Excellence from the British Society of Criminology (BSC) Learning and Teaching Network.

The degree is also closely aligned to the research activities of our staff, who have a growing international profile for shaping understanding and practice in the criminal justice sector. Research projects cover everything from drug use, hate crime and human trafficking to psychopathy, organised crime and witness reliability.

You’ll also have the chance to meet influential leaders in the profession. Our regular programme of guest speakers keeps you in tune with latest developments in policy and practice. Previous guest speakers include crown court judges, police investigators and professionals from the youth justice practice.

Equipment and resources

As a BSc (Hons) Criminology student, you’ll be based on the Derby Campus at One Friar Gate Square. Offering the perfect environment for innovative and engaging teaching, it includes well-resourced lecture theatres, seminar rooms and social learning spaces.

You’ll be able to gain practical experience of investigative processes using our first-rate facilities such as a replica crown court and police interview suites.

Because you’ll be working alongside students taking courses in subjects such as law, sociology and policing, there are many opportunities to share knowledge, expertise and experience.


Study overseas

Spending time studying in another country is a great way to broaden your academic experience, enhance your personal development, boost your confidence and expand your career opportunities.

A highlight of the Criminology course is the opportunity for all second year students to go on a week long visit to the United States to examine how the justice systems differs from the UK. Flights and accommodation all paid for by the department. The week is planned with the academics and visiting students to ensure the trip is both insightful as well as enjoyable. 

In addition to our optional field trips to the USA and The Hague, you could choose to study part of your degree at one of our partner universities in America:

• Eastern Michigan University
• Keene State College in New Hampshire
• Longwood University in Virginia
• Indiana University - Purdue University Indianapolis

You can also choose to study Criminology through the Joint Honours scheme where you can combine it with another subject.

What you will study

Year 1Year 1Year 2Year 2Year 3Year 3

Code: 4CJ521

Introduction to Criminological Theory

The module provides students with an introduction to the study of criminology. This module will explain what the roots of criminological theory are and will map both historical and contemporary theoretical debates. It outlines a range of theoretical perspectives and debates that inform criminology as a field of study. Students develop foundation knowledge of the main perspectives in criminology and how they have been applied to generate criminological knowledge. The module explores the key schools of thought on criminology, beginning with the early origins of criminology and the Classical School. Seminal works and key theorists of the 19th and 20th centuries are explored and examined, giving students an overview of criminological thought up to the present day.

The module covers feminist perspectives, radical theories, and integrated theories of criminology. Students will be able to make connections between theories of crime and crime control policies. Criminological theories will also be evaluated in relation to empirical evidence. By the end of the module, students will have a sound understanding of the core attempts to explain criminal behaviour, and will be able to critique these theoretical accounts which underpin their learning in the criminology programme.

More information
20 Credits
core
Coursework

Code: 4CJ523

Offending and Offenders

This module poses a range of fundamental introductory questions for students embarking on the study of criminology. How much crime is there? Why do people offend? Who offends? How do they offend? How does society respond? Does treatment work? We introduce students to the analysis of policy and practice for work with offenders. In the process, we cover a range of offenders and offending behaviour, from less serious offenders to those who may pose a risk of serious harm, and analyse research about patterns of offending, including prolific offending. We also consider theoretical models for interventions and the effectiveness of those interventions. The production of crime statistics is considered along with alternative ways of measuring crime, such as the use of victimisation surveys and self-report studies.

The module examines patterns of behaviour associated with particular types of offending (e.g. property, violent and sexual offences), and explores offending linked with substance misuse and mental health issues. We identify and debate ethical dilemmas associated with working with offenders. The module embraces inclusionary rather than exclusionary approaches, and this involves a discussion of values and debates about proportionate responses and tensions between individual rights and public protection. The impact of social inequalities and issues of gender, race and ethnicity, and class are integral to this. All of this contributes to a deeper understanding of offenders and offending.

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20 Credits
core
Coursework

Code: 4CJ525

Study Skills and Criminological Research

This module is designed to enable learners to adapt to the Higher Education learning environment by the development of a more independent, research-based, reflective and self-managed approach to study, learning and time management. It seeks to raise the student’s awareness of his or her own skills, attributes and competencies that are relevant to university, research and work life. Students can then appraise when and how to utilise these in a range of contexts and for diverse purposes. In this sense, this module prepares students to consider their journey through university, career and research pathways as well as having opportunities to demonstrate and reflect upon their use of their core skills, attributes and competencies.
20 Credits
core
Coursework

Code: 4CJ526

The Criminal Justice System

This module examines responses to crime within the context of a range of issues associated with criminal justice agencies and institutions. The criminal justice process embodies the manner in which the state responds to behaviour which it labels as ‘criminal’. Justice is delivered via a series of stages which include detection, arrest, charge, trial, sentence and punishment and/or rehabilitation. We critically explore the processes which led to the formation of criminal justice institutions and policies and consider the role of government, governance and political power in shaping these institutions and policies.

We also explain, analyse and evaluate the mechanisms and functions of criminal justice institutions, notably policing, prosecution, sentencing, and rehabilitative and penal agencies and institutions. We consider a range of historical and contemporary issues associated with the development and nature of contemporary policing, imprisonment, and probation. The module also analyses community and penal sentences from both historical and contemporary perspectives. The module further considers the impact of social inequalities and socioeconomic status on the wider criminal justice process. Issues of gender, race and ethnicity, and class are integral to this.

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20 Credits
core
Exam

Code: 4CJ527

Undertaking Criminological Research

The module is designed to introduce students to a range of quantitative criminological research methods, and assist them in beginning to develop the ability to apply critical analysis to criminological research and criminal justice policy. The module provides students with an introduction to criminological research methods, covering basic quantitative approaches to researching crime and justice. The module will introduce students to key data sources used in criminological and develop an understanding of the various ways in which criminological research can influence how we perceive the problem of crime, respond to it and how it can impact upon the development of policy. Students will be provided with the opportunity to work with data (input, analyse and interpret) through the use of SPSS.
20 Credits
core
Coursework

Code: 4CJ528

Crime, Justice and Society

This module introduces students to some key basic concepts in criminology, including the prevalence of offending; competing explanations of crime causation; and patterns of offending amongst different groups in society. The module places this examination within the context of our wider society and considers the socio-economic, political and cultural context that influences much of our thinking about crime. Exploring the relationship between crime and society, the module considers the impact of social inequalities and socio-economic status on experiences of crime. Issues of gender, race and ethnicity, class, and social exclusion are analysed, and their links with the dynamics of crime and its control are explored. Responses to behaviour labelled as ‘criminal’ are evaluated. In addition, we consider the role of government, governance and political power in shaping how we understand, and respond to, crime in our societies.

This module equips students with the basic skills necessary to study criminology from an interdisciplinary perspective and to develop their understanding of key concepts surrounding crime, crime control and the enactment of justice and punishment.

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20 Credits
core
Coursework

Code: 5CJ518

Policing and Society

Ethical policing has become an increasingly important subject for debate. The police, like other criminal justice agencies, have a responsibility to safeguard the rule of law. Equally, policing in the UK is premised upon the support and confidence of the public, and their position of authority requires the police to take into account the fundamental rights and freedoms of the individual. This module deals with the concepts, debates, literature and research relating to police ethics. We will develop a systematic understanding of the ways in which policing is, and can be, practised. Throughout the programme the use of case studies and scenarios will help provide the backdrop of theoretical and academic discussion. The module particularly develops knowledge of how police ethics and principles of policing related to the practice of criminal investigation and to concepts of policing by consent.
20 Credits
core
Coursework

Code: 5CJ546

Penology: Punishment and Rehabilitation

Penology is the study of punishment, and the philosophical and sociological study of penal and rehabilitative agencies and institutions. This module analyses the ideas, principles, policies and practices of the penal and rehabilitative systems, alongside their broader socio-economic, historical, intellectual and political contexts. This module focuses on the fundamental issues of punishment and rehabilitation and considers the key questions of how we punish people, why we do so, and whether rehabilitation works. These are key areas for the study of criminology and criminal justice. The notion of punishment as the major weapon in the arsenal against crime is gradually declining. Penology’s primary focus has been on analysing the legitimacy of imprisonment and evaluating the effectiveness of alternatives to prison. The module assesses the effectiveness of penal policy in communities and in prisons.

The module focuses on contemporary developments in probation and offender management, including the growing involvement of the private sector and the growth in community sentencing. The module also includes the study of comparative penologies.

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20 Credits
core
Coursework

Code: 5CJ547

Real World Criminology

This module aims to blend together research and employability attribute and skills to enable students complete a real world criminology project. Students will conduct an applied criminology research project, which may be undertaken in a field work context and/or in the context of a work placement. However, students will be required to prepare contingency plans for alternative research in the event of access problems. The project will offer the opportunity to engage in critical analysis of data, as well as providing reflexive insights into the experience of applied criminology research. The combination of academic and real world experience will assist students to test their career goals and to position themselves in a competitive market for employment and postgraduate opportunities.

Students will identify appropriate strategies to overcome barriers to finding a suitable research field work and/or work placement. Students will be encouraged to develop the resilience necessary to deal with problems and obstacles frequently encountered when conducting real-world research.

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20 Credits
core
Coursework

Code: 5CJ548

Social Research Methods

This module is comprised of three elements: firstly providing students with the opportunity to consider the merits of qualitative research approaches; secondly, developing qualitative practice based skills through the use of handling, analysing qualitative data and interpreting it; thirdly, designing a small scale research project after considering the suitability of a range of research methodologies. In addition to exposing students to qualitative research approaches, the module aims to develop students’ academic skills, including: conducting literature reviews; applying relevant theory; designing and planning small scale research projects; selecting appropriate methods for data collection and analysis; addressing and seeking to minimise ethical and quality issues; reflection upon the process and experience of designing an applied criminology research project.

In this element of the module, the emphasis is on students taking responsibility themselves for networking and negotiating with stakeholders (internal and external to the university) suitable fieldwork or work placement access (for the second semester) in order to conduct their applied criminology research projects. Students are encouraged to focus on significant opportunities and identifying appropriate strategies to overcome barriers to finding a suitable research fieldwork and/or work placement. Students must also prepare for the realities of conducting field-work by identifying a suitable fall-back option in case access problems are encountered.

Students will be afforded the opportunity to work with qualitative data through the completion of a series of skills-based tasks using NVIVO or related software packages.

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20 Credits
core
Coursework

Code: 5CR500

Themes in Criminal Psychology

The module focuses on psychological theories of crime and criminal etiology. The module will cover an exploration, via case studies, of questions raised by the presence of crime and 'the criminal' in society. There will be a critical evaluation of the differing international approaches to offender profiling including an overview of contemporary developments of profiling as a ‘science’, a review of the findings from work in this area, applications and implications and an evaluation of how effective offender profiling is in practice. An investigation will take place into issues relating to the psychology of police investigations, including, but not limited to, police interviewing and eyewitness testimonies.
20 Credits
core
Coursework

Code: 5CR506

Victimology

Victims of crime attract unprecedented academic interest, both as a subject of psychological enquiry, and as a focus of criminal justice policy. Since the 1960s, victimisation surveys have aimed to quantify the unreported ‘dark figure’ of crime and have thus helped to build interest in this area. The need to protect the rights of victims has become increasingly important in terms of public opinion and judicial practice. This has given rise to revisions in sentencing and the advent of restorative justice. The rights of victims are now viewed as an integral part of criminal justice.

Whilst societal views and criminal justice responses have impacted upon victims and their status, it is of importance to understand the physical, social, psychological and emotional effects they might face in context of the primary offence. Therefore, both societal and psychological effects will therefore be explored within this module.

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20 Credits
core
Coursework

Code: 6CJ501

Cybercrime

This module examines cybercrime as one of the fastest-growing criminal activities and explores the transformation of criminal activity in the information age. The module will examine issues such as: the automation of offender victim engagement; policing online deviance; practical, ethical and legal issues for the detection, investigation and prosecution of cybercrime; the global nature of many cybercrimes; the relevance and applicability of existing criminological theory to a range of cybercrimes; predicting future challenges of cybercrimes for individuals, the criminal justice system and society as a whole.
20 Credits
optional
Coursework

Code: 6CJ510

Youth Justice

This module brings together the current state of theory, practice and evidence to give you the knowledge, confidence and knowledge base and transferable skills around working with young people at risk of offending. It will also give you the framework to assess new ideas and evidence arising in the future. The module is taught in three blocks; block one introduces you to the youth justice system operating in England and Wales providing you with a historical perspective on how the system has evolved over time and how it compares with systems in other countries. You are encouraged to reflect on political and social attitudes to young people and their impact on responses to youth crime. The second element focuses on theories of youth offending and provides you with an opportunity to consider the question, ‘why do young people commit crimes?’.

You will develop your understanding of the theoretical perspectives introduced at Level 4 that have emerged in an attempt to explain youth crime and will have the opportunity to apply these theories to the case studies of five young people that will be introduced to you during this module. The final block looks at current practice in youth justice and how the ‘what works’ movement has developed, you will also consider some of the frameworks that have been developed for judging the quality and reliability of research and the challenges this raises.

You can undertake this module alongside the sister module - Working with Young Offenders in the Spring Semester - to build towards the Youth Justice in Effective Practice Certificate, an industry recognised practitioner-based certificate, awarded by UNITAS and endorsed by Skills for Justice. Since it was introduced in 2012 the YJEPC has been used by over half of Youth Offending Teams to enhance their members’ skills and knowledge. It is also used by the secure estate, individuals seeking to advance a career in youth justice and volunteers looking to widen their knowledge.

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20 Credits
optional
Coursework

Code: 6CJ522

Applied Policing Studies

This is a module specially designed for students wishing to pursue a career as a Police Officer. It will provide students with the opportunity to undertake the Certificate of Knowledge (CKP) in Policing, which is a qualification designed by the College of Policing. This element of the module will cover the necessary legislation, police powers and relevant practical skills required to ensure students are competent prior to application to a police service. The CKP is a mandatory requirement for all applicants to a number of police services in England and Wales. The module will also provide students with a clear understanding of the role of a police officer, both in a social context and within the wider criminal justice system. Additionally, students will address such issues as ethics, policing by consent, legitimacy and discretion. In order to do so, students will explore theoretical studies that underpin contemporary police practice.

Finally, this module has an applied element, allowing students to develop an investigative mindset together with necessary skills required for the role of a police officer, namely, communication, investigative interviewing, critical thinking, and decision-making.

Students will be required to receive 4 hours of contact per week during the semester and attend a three-week block course during May to receive both the credits and the CKP.

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20 Credits
optional
Coursework

Code: 6CJ535

Criminology: Theory and Practice

This module represents an opportunity for the student to apply the knowledge and understanding gained from the taught modules within the Criminology programme of study to a specific research problem of their choice. As producers and researchers of knowledge, students will have the opportunity to apply their initiative, creative and problem based thinking to a specific topic they wish to investigate further, drawing upon the research skills which have been developed over the three years of their study here. Criminology: Theory and Practice is a through credit module running across both semesters and while the emphasis of this is around independent study and organisational skills, students will be supported in this process by a supervisor with an interest in their area to help them develop questions and execute proposals over the set time frame. Both primary and secondary research projects can be conducted within this context.

Students will be able to choose between a research project based on an independent research question or a project based on their reflections related to a research question linked to their work experience (paid or voluntary).

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40 Credits
optional
Coursework

Code: 6CJ536

International Criminology

In the eighteenth century, classical criminologists delivered seminal comparative analyses, contrasting their own national justice systems with those of other nations. However, as a specific academic field, the study of comparative, cross-cultural crime and crime control is less than four decades old. This module systematically explores and analyses theoretically-informed comparisons of crime and crime control. We range across national boundaries to question exactly how justice and penal systems differ, and why. The module includes consideration of aspects of the systems in China, Japan, Scandinavia, Europe, and Russia, and reflects on both the commonalities and discontinuities between nations. A key focus for the module is the discourse on criminological theory, policy and practice in the USA.

This module also introduces students to transnational organised and corporate crime, and questions how global and local economic, political, and social conditions combine to promote transnational crime.

The module engages with a range of empirical questions, and is underpinned by an appreciation of the consistencies, contradictions and conflicts inherent in the functioning of international criminal and community justice and penology. A range of ethical dilemmas are expressed. Considerations of gender, race, ethnicity and class constitute key aspects of the module’s conceptual framework.

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40 Credits
optional
Coursework

Code: 6CJ537

Investigation of Crime

Over recent years, a number of high profile miscarriages of justice have arisen as a result of defects in the investigative process. This module is designed to provide you with an introduction to criminal investigation and a logical framework for understanding the investigative process. From the range of case studies utilised in this module, there will be an examination of the integration of historical, empirical and theoretical approaches to issues in the evidence gathering and criminal justice processes. This module analyses the interview and questioning process, with a view to understanding behaviours and dynamics within the “interview room”. There will also be an examination of the range of factors that can affect eyewitness testimony from adult and child witnesses; including discussion of current approaches to increasing accuracy and completeness of such testimony.

The module also addresses factors that may trigger false confessions and examines the feasibility of detecting deception through of range of suggested verbal and physical clues. Further topics will include examination of the decision-making processes within investigations.

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40 Credits
optional
Coursework

Code: 6CJ538

Crime, Media and Culture

Since the beginning of cinema, crime has been a mainstay of modern media: The Australian film, The Ned Kelly Gang (1906) is commemorated in the UNESCO ‘Memory of the World Register’ as the oldest surviving feature film. Even before then, pamphlets and chapbooks recounting the exploits of notorious criminals circulated as popular forms of entertainment. The 21st Century has seen no lessening of the representation of crimes, criminality and deviance in the mass media. Film and television rely on tropes of criminal families, extremes of criminal behaviour, policing and crime detection for a range of entertainment products; news on all media repeatedly feature crime stories whilst video games place players in the roles of both law enforcers and perpetrators of crime. In all of these instances the texts rehearse and confirm boundaries of legally sanctioned behaviours and, simultaneously, the pleasures of transgression.

They also serve to define and reproduce stereotypes and preconceived notions of criminals, their victims, enforcers and the locations of crime. This module thus serves to explore the tension between the representation of crime and the impact of these representations on wider culture and society.

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20 Credits
optional
Coursework

Code: 6CJ539

Sexual Violence, Exploitation and Abuse

This module explores the sexual violence, exploitation and abuse of women, children and men. In particular, it focuses upon the impact on victims and the responses of voluntary and state services. It starts by unpacking what is meant by ‘sexual violence’, analysing social attitudes, myths, moral panics and the impact on contemporary society. Here, the focus is on sexual politics, the control of sexual behaviours and philosophical approaches to sex and sexuality. Secondly, the module considers violence against women, men and children with an emphasis on policy and practice, considering the role of practitioners in supporting victims of sexual crimes. There will be an exploration of the responses of the criminal justice system, including changing policy and practice and competing theories on supporting victims of sexual violence. As a result, this module provides both a broad theoretical framework and applied knowledge for those students seeking to work with victims of sexual violence.
20 Credits
optional
Coursework

Code: 6CJ540

Substance Misuse

The misuse/use of illegal and legal drugs is of growing concern across many areas of health and social care provision. The trade in illicit drugs is a global issue, crossing international boundaries, and creating threats to public health and political stability in many countries. The use of legal drugs such as alcohol and tobacco has been recognised as contributing toward a significant expenditure in the NHS. In addition to the impact of substance use/misuse to the UK as a whole, it is also important to consider the potential impact on the individual user and their close social networks. This module aims to provide you with an overview of the substances used in contemporary society, their effects on the individual and impact on public health. Social policy, linked to drug use, will be considered at a national and international level acknowledging substance use/misuse as a global issue. The treatment options available in the UK will also be considered within the module.
20 Credits
optional
Coursework

Code: 6CJ542

Working with Young Offenders

This module provides you with the practical skills as well as the theoretical underpinning to work with young people at risk of offending. It will give you the knowledge that you need to make informed decisions about the interventions which offer the best prospect of success in a particular case. It will also guide you to ways of implementing interventions that will engage and involve young people and hence has an applied element. The module is taught in two blocks, with an optional third if you wish to undertake the Certificate. In the first block you will consider the structural cycle of interventions and the key components of assessment, planning and review. You are encouraged to explore different approaches to assessment and consider the importance of linking assessments to intervention planning.

You will also evaluate safeguarding issues and the diversity of young people in determining the most appropriate interventions. Having looked at the cycle of intervention, block two explores the significance of building and sustaining relationships with young people at all stages of the cycle in order to promote positive outcomes. You will have the opportunity to develop your understanding of communication strategies by young offenders as well as enhance your own applied skills with a practical focus.

You can undertake this module alongside the sister module - Youth Justice - in the Autumn Semester to build towards the Youth Justice in Effective Practice Certificate, an industry recognised practitioner based certificate, awarded by UNITAS and endorsed by Skills for Justice. Since it was introduced in 2012 the YJEPC has been used by over half of the Youth Offending Teams to enhance their members’ skills and knowledge. It is also used by the secure estate, individuals seeking to advance a career in youth justice and volunteers looking to widen their knowledge.

More information
20 Credits
optional
Coursework

Code: 6CJ546

Murder: Dynamics, Pathologies and Investigation

Accounts of murder are commonplace in today’s world. Whilst they fixate both public and media attention, beyond the simplicity of newspaper headlines the offence of murder often involves complex underlying dynamics, psychological pathologies, detailed investigative procedures, and a legal framework for sentencing and punishment. In this module, students travel the chronology of murder, from the development of a killer’s psychology through to the commission of the offence(s), their investigation, and then sentencing. Students will see, from crime scene to trial, the complex tasks of both understanding, and investigating, murderers and their crimes.
20 Credits
optional
Coursework

Code: 6CR501

Psychopathy

The focus of this module is to acquire in-depth knowledge and develop a critical evaluation of central issues within the psychopathy research field. Through scheduled lectures and seminars the students will gain an understanding of, and learn how to critically evaluate, the psychopathy construct, how to measure psychopathic traits, etiology (“nature versus nurture”), the relationship between psychopathic traits and criminality, and criminal justice interventions. Furthermore, the role of psychopathy in the broader criminal justice system will be discussed Please note that this module will concentrate on psychopathy as an academic research field.
20 Credits
optional
Coursework

Code: 6CR502

Offenders with Mental and Intellectual Disabilities

The general public, rightly or wrongly, often view offenders with mental and intellectual disabilities as dangerous individuals, whose unpredictable behaviour provokes fear. But what is a mental and intellectual disability in the context of an offending behaviour? Do mental and/or intellectual disabilities cause offending? Can offending exacerbate underlying mental and /or intellectual disabilities? How should the mental health care and criminal justice systems respond to crime?

This module aims to answer these questions by critically analysing the relationship between mental and intellectual disabilities and offending behaviours, as well as critically examining how societal change, legislation, and government policy have impacted on the treatment or imprisonment of offenders with mental and intellectual disabilities. The provisions of the Mental Health Act 2007 will be considered in the context of public safety.

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20 Credits
optional
Coursework

Code: 6CR504

Applied Working with Offenders

This module offers students the opportunity to explore the issues, and practicalities, involved in working with, and rehabilitating, offenders. How do practitioners justify decisions made within practice in response to complex situations? The module aims to build understanding of the framework of structured intervention which operates within the probation and prison services, and of the matching of offenders to appropriate interventions. It explains and identifies appropriate theoretical models and concepts for assessment and intervention and their appropriate application to offender management. The module also identifies problems within professional practice and applies problem-solving approaches to their resolution and evaluation.

The module provides students with a taught element, providing them with the required knowledge base to explore this topic. There are areas of practical activity (dependent on availability): prison visits and talks with offenders, offender managers, and prison officers Planning appropriate and proportionate responses to the risks posed by, and needs of, offenders and balancing rights and public protection is considered. The values and ethics that underpin practice frameworks are analysed and decision-making about appropriate and proportionate intervention, balancing rights and risks, is explored. The application of the principles of promoting equality, and valuing diversity and anti-discriminatory practice, in working with offenders is explored.

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40 Credits
optional
Coursework

Code: 6LA548

Domestic Abuse

Students will explore the definitions of domestic violence (DV) used by the various agencies involved in this area before analysing the nature and prevalence of DV and identifying the victims and perpetrators. The legal and medical responses to victims and perpetrators will also be examined and will be further evaluated by taking a psychological approach to the dynamics of abuse.
20 Credits
optional
Coursework

Code: 6LA549

Miscarriages of Justice

This module enables you to work in an applied manner with reference to cases of miscarriages of justice (MOJ). You will be working in groups throughout your final year on past and present cases with a view to identifying the causes of MOJ.

The first part of the module takes a more traditional and theoretical approach to the subject area which is, subsequently applied during the second half of the year using live cases. The rationale for this module is to identify common themes and causes of MOJ and to make recommendations for best practice and thus prevent and minimise the number of cases going to appeal.

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40 Credits
optional
Coursework

Code: 6SL528

Populism, Extremism & Violence

There has been an increasing awareness that a great many violent acts committed in the UK, North America, Europe, and Australasia are motivated by ideologies of hate. There is an increasing reluctance to readily describe the actions of individuals such as Anders Breivik, Dylann Roof, Thomas Mair, or Brenton Tarrant as simply psychological in nature. Instead, these acts are more typically now seen as terrorist attacks motivated by differing forms of white supremacism and neo-fascism.

In addition to these extreme acts, Western societies have also witnessed an increased awareness, and rising levels, of hate crime and hate incidents. Much scholarship suggests that the ideas contributing to these ideologies exist on a spectrum that includes the ‘populist turn’ in Western politics and the violence committed is an extreme form of the anti-immigrant, anti-Semitic, and ethnonationalist sentiments that define populism.

This module examines the histories, cultures, and ideas that sustain and fuel both these violent acts and the new populism. It will also consider the deeper question of what kind of social and cultural environments are productive of populist sentiment and in what circumstances does that become expressed in violent ways. The module will take an interdisciplinary approach that draws on the best scholarship in the field, with an emphasis on the following disciplines: sociology, criminology, and political studies.

More information
20 Credits
optional
Coursework

Please note that our modules are subject to change - we review the content of our courses regularly, making changes where necessary to improve your experience and graduate prospects.

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Undergraduate Live Online Events

While we’re not able to welcome you in person to our campuses at the moment, we’re not going to let that stop us showing you all the great things about studying at Derby.

We’re currently planning our autumn Open Events to bring you the best possible online and on-campus experience.

Book your Live Online EventBook your Live Online Event

Virtual Open Day

Delve deeper into the course with our Virtual Open Day, packed with subject and course information to help you make your choice, including tours of facilities, 360° views of award-winning accommodation plus advice and insight from students and academics.

Explore our Virtual Open DayExplore our Virtual Open Day

How you will learn

You’ll learn through a combination of:

• lectures
• tutorials
• group work
• independent learning

How you are assessed

Assessment is via a stimulating mix of:

• coursework
• portfolios
• individual and group projects/presentations
• examinations


Who you’ll meet

You’ll be taught by our team of engaging, passionate and inspiring subject experts. We also offer a high level of support to students, including a unique personal tutor system to help steer your academic and professional development.

The team includes:

Personal academic tutoring

Your personal academic tutor will work with you to help you get the most out of your time at university. Having someone to talk to about your academic progress, your university experience and your professional aspirations is hugely valuable. We want you to feel challenged in your studies, stretched but confident to achieve your academic and professional goals.

Find out more about personal academic tutoring

Who will teach you

A lecture sat in a conference

Dr David Patton
Programme leader

Dr David Patton is a Senior Lecturer in Criminology and has been lecturing since 1998. He is also Programme Leader for BSc (Hons) Criminology and a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy. 

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Entry requirements

September 2020 typical entry requirements

RequirementWhat we're looking for
UCAS points112 (up to 16 from AS-levels)
Specific requirements at A-level

No specific subject requirements

Specific requirements at GCSEGCSE Maths and English Grade C/Grade 4 (or above) or equivalent qualification
IELTS6.0 (with 5.5 in each skills area)
Interview / AuditionN/A
PortfolioN/A

Alternative entry qualifications:

We usually consider an A-level in General Studies as a supplementary qualification. A good application/performance will be taken into account if you do not meet the criteria/offer conditions.

The University of Derby in collaboration with Nottinghamshire Police and Derbyshire Constabulary run the police cadet scheme resulting in the Foundation in Policing qualification. On successful completion of the Foundation in Policing, applicants applying for this course will qualify for entry.

Our entry requirements for this course should be read together with the University's general entry requirements, which details subjects we accept, alternative qualifications and what we're looking for at Derby.

September 2021 typical entry requirements

RequirementWhat we're looking for
UCAS points120
Specific requirements at A-level

No specific subject requirements

Specific requirements at GCSEGCSE Maths and English Grade C/Grade 4 (or above) or equivalent qualification
IELTS6.0 (with 5.5 in each skills area)
Interview / AuditionN/A
PortfolioN/A

Alternative entry qualifications:

We usually consider an A-level in General Studies as a supplementary qualification. A good application/performance will be taken into account if you do not meet the criteria/offer conditions.

The University of Derby in collaboration with Nottinghamshire Police and Derbyshire Constabulary run the police cadet scheme resulting in the Foundation in Policing qualification. On successful completion of the Foundation in Policing, applicants applying for this course will qualify for entry.

Our entry requirements for this course should be read together with the University's general entry requirements, which details subjects we accept, alternative qualifications and what we're looking for at Derby.

Fees and funding

2020/21 Fees

 Full-timePart-time
UK/EU

£9,250 per year

N/A

International

£14,045 per year

N/A

Further information about our fees and support you may be entitled to.

Additional costs and optional extras

How to apply

UK/EU students

Full-time students applying to start in September should apply for this course through UCAS or you can apply directly to the University for an undergraduate course if you’re not applying to any other UK university in the same year.

Apply through UCASApply directly to the University

Guidance for EU students post-Brexit

International students

Full-time students applying to start in September should apply for this course through UCAS or you can apply directly to the University for an undergraduate course if you’re not applying to any other UK university in the same year.

Apply through UCASApply directly to the University

Guidance for international applicants applying for an undergraduate degree

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Clearing

If you don’t have a place at uni, have had a change of heart about your course, or maybe your gap year plans are on hold – don’t worry. Call our Clearing hotline on 01332 592020 and explore your options.

Call our Clearing hotlineCall our Clearing hotline

Careers

One of the advantages of the BSc (Hons) Criminology is the huge career scope it delivers. We’re aware of the rapid pace of change in the dynamic criminology sector and are committed to helping you develop a valuable set of skills which are attractive to a wide range of employers nationally and internationally.

Our graduates have gone on to diverse roles in the police, Crown Prosecution Service, courts, probation and prison services, youth offending teams and other law enforcement agencies. Some have also progressed to rewarding careers in the voluntary sector, working with offenders or victims.

Because this degree also equips you with broader skills – from research and analysis to entrepreneurial thinking – you will have the versatility to pursue other career paths in areas such as social research, public sector management or third sector roles such as victim services. Some graduates use their qualification as a springboard into teaching or academic research too.

Our Careers and Employment Service will provide you with support from day one of your course to ensure you leave Derby as a ‘work-ready’ graduate – industry aware, motivated and enterprising. Throughout your studies, you’ll also benefit from our Personal Development Planning (PDP) scheme which enables you to reflect on your learning and develop your career ambitions.

The support continues once you’ve completed your course too: you are entitled to further help and guidance from the Careers and Employment Service for up to three years after leaving the University.

Further study

You can go on to pursue postgraduate study at Derby, with our acclaimed MSc qualifications in subjects such as Forensic and Criminal Psychology, Criminal Investigation, Criminal Justice and Criminology and PG Cert Understanding Radicalisation.

These will expand your knowledge into more specialist areas and help accelerate your progress to senior and leadership roles.

“I was immediately drawn to this particular course as I felt it coincided with both my professional and research interests. As someone who already works in practice, I was impressed to see that the course could be tailored for someone who is employed, allowing me a flexible approach to my studies.” Alan Harrop, MSc Criminal Justice and Criminology.

As a graduate of the University of Derby, you may benefit from an alumni discount on your postgraduate course fees if you continue to study with us.

Contact us

If you need any more information from us, eg on courses, accommodation, applying, car parking, fees or funding, please contact us and we will do everything we can to help you.

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Additional information about your studies

Teaching hours

Like most universities, we operate extended teaching hours at the University of Derby, so contact time with your lecturers and tutors could be anytime between 9am and 9pm. Your timetable will usually be available on the website 24 hours after enrolment on to your course.

Additional costs and optional extras

We’re committed to providing you with an outstanding learning experience. Our expert teaching, excellent facilities and great employability prepare you for your future career. As part of our commitment to you we aim to keep any additional study costs to a minimum. However, there are occasions where students may incur some additional costs.

The information below is correct for entry in the academic year September 2020 - August 2021 only. Entry for future academic years may be subject to change.

Included in your fees

Please note: Our courses are refreshed and updated on a regular basis. If you are thinking about transferring onto this course (into the second year for example), you should contact the programme leader for the relevant course information as modules may vary from those shown on this page.

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