Staff profile

Dr Henry Lennon


Lecturer in Criminal Psychology

Henry Lennon at our One Friar Gate Square site.

Subject

Criminology and Criminal Psychology

College

College of Business, Law and Social Sciences

Department

Criminology and Social Sciences

Research centre

Better Society

Campus

One Friar Gate Square, Derby Campus

Email

H.Lennon@derby.ac.uk

About

I am a Lecturer in Criminal Psychology at the University of Derby. My role as an academic, involves teaching students and conducting research in the field of social, discursive, and critical psychology. My expertise is in qualitative (social psychological) research. My PhD looked at the discursive construction of Romanian identity and migration in the UK.

Teaching responsibilities

My teaching is in social, biological, developmental and cognitive psychology (following the BPS structure), on the BSc Criminal Psychology course. I am module leader for 'The Legal and Criminal Justice Context of Forensic and Criminal Psychology' on the MSc Criminal Psychology course. I supervise undergraduate and postgraduate students, primarily supporting those whose interests are in qualitative research approaches. I am a personal academic tutor, supporting a student cohort’s development across the course. I am also a tutor for our 3rd year students, acting as an advocate, coach and further source of support. In 2020, I will begin studying on the PgCert and will be working towards a HEA Fellowship.

Membership of professional bodies

My research interests broadly fit into applied, social, and community psychology domains, being concerned with topics such as citizenship, social identity, and prejudice. Epistemologically speaking, my concern is the way that knowledge is constructed, reproduced and transformed in society and the implications this process has for conceptualising the way we see others and ourselves around us.

I have experience with a variety of qualitative research approaches, most of them being in the realm of discursive analysis (critical and discursive psychology) and thematic analysis. I have experience with both primary and secondary data collection methodologies; in recent times my focus has been on the latter, in particular political cartoons (see below for references).

Qualifications

Recent conferences

Presentations

‘Civic Struggles: Critical Psychology reflections on pre-referendum Romanian mover discourse in post-referendum context’ (January 2019). Presented as an invited speaker at University of Lincoln.

 ‘Accusation and Justification: A Comparative Discourse Analysis of Romanian Identity and Belonging in UK television media and Romanian Interview Accounts’ (June 2017). Presented at Postgraduate and Early Career Researcher Conference at Sheffield Hallam University.

‘Challenging the ‘Great Big Romanian Invasion’ Narrative: A discourse analysis focusing on resistance and contestation’ (December, 2015). Presented at the Annual Research and Scholarship Conference, Sheffield Hallam University.

‘Desert Island Data: An Investigation into Researcher Positionality and Interpretivism’ (December, 2015). Co-presented at the Annual Research and Scholarship Conference, Sheffield Hallam University.

‘“Would you be concerned”? Deploying and contesting an ‘imperative repertoire’ of Romanian identity and migration in British public discourse’ (September, 2015). Presented at Development & Society’s Faculty Research Conference at Sheffield Hallam University.

‘“Too much immigration, I’m moving to Spain”: Dilemmatic Frames and Metaphoric Features in Contemporary Migration Discourse in BBC’s Question Time’. (July, 2015). Presented at Postgraduate and Early Career Researcher Conference at Sheffield Hallam University.

The ‘Living Document’: Situating Reflective Commentary in the PhD Student-Supervisor Relationship’ (June, 2014). Presented at Learning and Teaching Conference at Sheffield Hallam University.

Undergraduate Research at the University of Lincoln: A Student’s Perspective’ (April, 2013). Presented at ‘External Examiner’s event’, at University of Lincoln.

Posters

‘Accusation and Justification: A Comparative Discourse Analysis of Romanian Identity and Belonging in UK television media and Romanian Interview Accounts’ (April 2017). Poster presented at the PhD Student Poster Event, at Sheffield Hallam University.

Renegotiating Britishness’: Discourses of Identity, (Not) Belonging, and Contestation In EU (Im)migrants and Regional Media in the UK’ (December, 2013). Poster presented at the Annual Research and Scholarship Conference, at Sheffield Hallam University.

‘Actively Seeking Maturity: An Empirical Exploration of “Maturity” Conception and Contestability Criteria’ (May, 2013). Poster presented at the Conference for Undergraduate Dissertations, at University of Lincoln.

‘Undergraduate Perceptions of University Life: A Qualitative Study’ (May, 2012). Poster presented at the Conference for Undergraduate Research, at University of Lincoln.

‘The Benefits of Peer Support in an Undergraduate Research Methods and Statistics Module: A Critical Phenomenological Analysis’ (November, 2012). Poster presented at the ‘Undergraduate Research Opportunities Scheme’ Conference, at University of Lincoln.

Development of Attentional Landscapes in Bimanual Movement Preparation’ (November, 2012). Poster presented at ‘Undergraduate Research Opportunities Scheme’ Conference, at University of Lincoln.

Recent publications

Lennon, H., & Kilby, L., (under review). A Multimodal Critical Discourse Analysis of ‘Brexit’: Flagging the nation in Political Cartoons. To appear in Burke, S., & Demasi, D. (eds.) The Discursive Psychology of Political Communication. Palgrave.

Kilby, L., & Lennon, H., (2018) Charlie Hebdo and the Prophet Muhammad: A Multimodal Critical Discourse Analysis of Peace and Violence in a Satirical Cartoon. In Gibson, S. (ed.) Discursive Psychology Perspectives: Discourse, Peace, and Conflict, pp.303-321. Springer: Switzerland. DOI: 10.1007/978-3-319-99094-1_17 (rated 3* by SHUs internal REF panel).

Dean, J., Furness, P., Verrier, D., Lennon, H., Bennett, C., & Spencer, S. (2018). Desert Island Data: an Investigation into Researcher Positionality. Qualitative Research, 18(3), 273-289. DOI: 10.1177/1468794117714612