English workshop details - University of Derby

English workshops

War poetry - enlarging the context

The work of the poets associated with the Great War is often considered solely in its immediate historical context. This session aims to enlarge students’ understanding of the contexts in which the poems of Wilfred Owen can be understood, by considering them in relation to the Romantics (principally Keats and Shelley) and to the birth of Modernism. The session takes the form of a lecture and workshop.

Skills:

  • Close reading
  • Comparative analysis
  • Formal analysis
  • Contextual analysis

John Clare and the sonnet

This session provides a brief overview of the history of the sonnet form in English: its key conventions, and important variants (Petrarch, Shakespeare, Milton). Following a lack of interest in the form (with some exceptions) after Milton, it was revived by the Romantics; Charlotte Smith, S. T. Coleridge, William Wordsworth, Percy Shelley and John Keats all made significant contributions. Considering Clare in this context, we then explore his sonnets in terms of their difference from those of previous writers.

Skills:

  • Contextual analysis
  • Comparative analysis
  • Formal analysis
  • Close reading

The struggle for identity

This session examines one or more texts on the AQA syllabus, including work by Kay, Atwood, Walker and Carter. A brief lecture would examine aspects of identity, including gender and race, and is followed by a workshop looking at aspects of the latter terms in a given text. Drawing on recent developments in cultural theory, this will enlarge students’ understanding of the contexts in which literature can be considered. 

Skills:

  • Contextual analysis
  • Close reading
  • Application of theory

The Victorian novelist, realist novel and narrative

In relation to specific texts, this session explores the development of realism in nineteenth-century fiction, drawing on narrative theory to define and locate the conventions of the form as well as its implications. A lecture is followed by a workshop in which students consider extracts from a novel or novels alongside theoretical ideas concerning narration and structure.

Skills:

  • Close reading
  • Formal analysis
  • Application of theory


Why study...? Talks

Enter English or History into UCAS and students are presented with over 130 full time options. These talks provide students with information on how to research courses, what to look for and what they need to consider when choosing both their degree subject and their university. We cover everything from teaching and assessment methods to getting a place and graduate careers. Our student mentors are also on hand to answer any questions from a student perspective.

We offer talks in the following areas:

  • History
  • English and English Language
  • Creative Writing & Professional Writing
  • American Studies and Liberal Arts
  • Media and Communication and Film and TV
  • Journalism
  • Writing and Publishing


If you require further information or would like to book any of the sessions above please contact us.

Contact us

E: sclteam@derby.ac.uk

T: 01332 591088