Dr Peter Brown

Position: Programme Leader MRes Sport and Exercise, Lecturer in Exercise Physiology

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About

  • Programme Leader for the MRes in Sport and Exercise
  • Lecture in Sport and Exercise Physiology
  • Chair of the Sport and Exercise Research Ethics Committee (SEREC)
  • Principal Researcher in the Biological Sciences Research Group (BSRG)

Teaching responsibilities

Exercise Physiology

Professional interests

I have worked in the private sector for a number of years on projects valued over £2 million providing applied physiological support for the Armed Forces including the British Army and the Royal Air Force, the United Arab Emirates Armed Forces, the Emergency Services and other industrial markets. In my current role I have provided sport science support for a number of teams and athlete. I am a BASES accredited Sport and Exercise Scientist and continue my research interests in Exercise and Respiratory Physiology. I am currently the lead for the Sport and Exercise consultancy wing known as Team Derby Performance.

Research interests

My research interests focus on the potential for the respiratory system to limit human performance in athletes, personnel working in physically demanding occupations and clinical populations. My doctoral training investigated the metabolic cost of the work of breathing during exercise and the effects of inspiratory muscle training. Further work has addressed the role of training the inspiratory muscles upon inspiratory muscle fatigue and cycling time-trial performance as well as the measurement of oesophageal and gastric pressures to further understand the evolution of inspiratory muscle strength. My recent research interests include the potential respiratory limitations to performance in physically demanding occupations and respiratory function in Elite British Powerlifters.

I am the director of studies for PhD student Mr Mark Faghy titled "Respiratory system limitations of Thoracic Load Carriage".

I have a keen pedagogical research interest in problem-based learning and active learning in Exercise Physiology

Membership of professional bodies

  • British Association of Sport and Exercise Science
  • American College of Sports Medicine
  • European College of Sport Science

Qualifications

  • BSc (Hons) Sport and Exercise Science, University of Wales Institute Cardiff
  • Masters of Sport and Exercise Science (MSc), University of Wales Institute Cardiff
  • PhD on Exercise and Respiratory Physiology, Nottingham Trent University

Recent publications

  • Brown, P.I and McConnell, A.K. (2012). Respiratory system limitations in physically demanding occupations. Aviation Space and Environmental Medicine.
  • Brown, P.I. Sharpe, G.R and Johnson, M.A. (In Press). Inspiratory muscle training abolishes the blood lactate increase associated with volitional hyperpnoea superimposed on exercise and accelerates lactate and oxygen uptake kinetics at the onset of exercise. European Journal of Applied Physiology.
  • Brown, P.I. McLellan, T.M. Linanne, D.M. Wilkinson, D.M. Richmond, V.L. Horner, F.E. Blacker, S.D and Rayson, M.P. (2010). Influence of hydration volume and ambient temperature on physiological responses in personal protective clothing. Ergonomics, 53:12, 1484-1499.
  • Brown, P.I. Johnson, M.A and Sharpe, G.R. (2010). Loading the trained inspiratory muscles speeds lactate recovery kinetics. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 42:6, 1103-1112.
  • Brown, P.I. Sharpe, G.R. and Johnson, M.A. (2008). Inspiratory muscle training reduces blood lactate concentration during volitional hyperpnoea at rest. European Journal of Applied Physiology, 104:1, 111-117.
  • Johnson, M.A. Sharpe, G.R. and Brown, P.I. (2007). Inspiratory muscle training improves cycling time-trial performance and anaerobic work capacity but not critical power. European Journal of Applied Physiology, 101:6, 761-770.

Recent conferences

Brown, P.I. (2010). Hydration Strategies for UK Emergency Service Personnel Deployed Wearing CBRN Personal Protective Equipment. Presented at the XIIIth International CBRN Defence Symposium, Shrivenham, UK.

Brown, P.I. Blacker, S.D. Pearson, E. Horner, F.E. Wilkinson, D.M. and Rayson, M.P. (2010). Hydration status during basic military training in officer cadets from the Gulf States. British Association of Sports and Exercise Sciences, University of Glasgow, UK.

Blacker, S.D, Brown, P.I. Pearson, E. Horner, F.E. Wilkinson, D.M. and Rayson, M.P. (2010). Differences in cardiovascular strain during basic military training between individuals of varying aerobic fitness. British Association of Sports and Exercise Sciences, University of Glasgow, UK.

Brown, P.I. McLellan, T.M. Linanne, D.M. Wilkinson, D.M. Richmond, V.L. Horner, F.E. Blacker, S.D and Rayson, M.P. (2010). Influence of hydration volume and ambient temperature on physiological responses in personal protective clothing. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 42:5, S565. American College of Sports Medicine, Baltimore, USA.

Brown, P.I. Johnson, M.A and Sharpe, G.R. (2009). Determinants of inspiratory muscle strength. British Association of Sports and Exercise Sciences, Leeds Metropolitan University, UK.

Johnson, M.A. Sharpe, G.R. and Brown, P.I. (2009). Effects of prior-exercise using remote muscle groups on indices of aerobic function and the power-time relationship. European College of Sport Science, Oslo, Norway.

Brown, P.I. Johnson, M.A and Sharpe, G.R. (2009). Cycling cadence influences physiological parameters at maximal lactate steady state. Journal of Sports Sciences, 26:S2, S32. British Association of Sports and Exercise Sciences, Brunel University, UK.

Sharpe, G.R. Brown, P.I. and Johnson, M.A. (2008). Inspiratory muscle training and loading accelerates blood lactate clearance. European College of Sport Science, Oslo, Norway.

Johnson, M.A. Sharpe, G.R. and Brown, P.I. (2008). The lactate minimum test predicts maximal lactate steady state but is dependent upon the method of lactate elevation. European College of Sport Science, Estoril, Portugal.

Brown, P.I. Sharpe, G.R. and Johnson, M.A.  (2008) Inspiratory muscle training reduces blood lactate concentration during steady state exercise and volitional hyperpnoea. European College of Sport Science, Estoril, Portugal.

Johnson, M.A. Sharpe, G.R. and Brown, P.I. (2007). Inspiratory muscle training improves cycling time-trial performance and anaerobic work capacity but not critical power. European College of Sport Science, Jyväskylä, Finland.

Brown, P.I. Sharpe, G.R. and Johnson, M.A. (2007) Inspiratory muscle training reduces blood lactate concentration during volitional hyperpnoea at rest. European College of Sport Science, Jyväskylä, Finland.

Additional interests and activities

  • Team Derby Performance
  • Derventio eXcel Swimming Club
  • Derby County Football Club
  • Burton Albion Football Club

Experience in industry

Physiological support to time-trial cyclists and Ironman triathletesDesigning of UK Emergency Services hydration guidelines for CBRN deployments.

Re-validation of British Army physical selection standards Design of Police Service of Northern Ireland Close Protection Unit physical selection standards

London Underground Limited - Physiological responses of tube passengersHealth, Nutrition and Fitness of United Arab Emirates Armed Forces Officer Cadets

Physical Demands Analysis of the Royal Air Force Phase 1 basic training

International experience

Providing consultancy for the United Arab Emirate Army, Air Force and Navy in Abu Dhabi and Dubai and Military High School in Al Ain.

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