Mr Tony Blockley BA MBA, Senior Lecturer in Criminal Investigation

In 2014 Tony joined the University of Derby as a lecturer in criminology and now as a member of the Institute, he teaches the majority of the MSc Criminal Investigation, together with a number of core modules, including Serious Crime.

As a former divisional chief superintendent with Derbyshire Constabulary, Tony draws on the knowledge he gained during his 32-year career.

As Head of Crime he was responsible for investigating serious crime, homicide forensics, public protection, covert operations and managing intelligence across Derbyshire. 

Tony is very keen to pass on to his students the experiences and knowledge that he gained, but he also wants to challenge students and fellow professionals so that they can work together to deliver better policing in this country and abroad.

Experience and current consultancy

When Tony retired from the police service he went to work for the Historical Enquiries Team (an organisation set up by Sir Hugh Orde under the Blair government; part of the Northern Ireland peace process), where he led a team of investigators reviewing the deaths attributable to the military and where members of the military had been killed.

Running in parallel with his teaching at the Institute, Tony is still involved in investigating domestic homicides, which he has done on a consultancy basis since 2011.

Tony is called in by the Community Safety Partnership, who have a statutory obligation to have all domestic homicides investigated and to examine the working practices of organisations and the functioning of multi-agency partnerships for all matters connected with domestic violence and abuse.

The aim of Tony’s investigations is to learn how to prevent future incidents and determine whether the death could have been predicted or prevented.

Academic study 

Tony gained his MBA at the Derby Business School in 2000 (when he worked for Derbyshire Constabulary) and he is currently studying for his PhD, which will focus on the assessment of risk in domestic violence and abuse cases, based on his professional experience and the work he is doing with the domestic homicide reviews.

He will be looking at those who are deemed to be at risk and will consider the way risk is assessed. Tony hopes that his work will help re-define the way that the police assess risk in the context of domestic violence and abuse, which accounts for 10% of all UK crime. 

Views on the Institute

For Tony, being able to incorporate professional work with his PhD studies, which will produce a unique body of research, is at the heart of what the Institute offers — the real world application of knowledge.

Students of the Institute not only benefit from Tony’s extensive knowledge, but from his on-going experiences in the field of homicide investigations, which keep him up-to-date with contemporary policing challenges and issues.

For Tony, the Institute adds real value to its students, because they gain an academic grounding and can understand how the theory works in practice.

For a policing institute to have any degree of authority with frontline personnel, it must demonstrate not only academic excellence, but how that knowledge can be practically applied to real life situations.

The Institute also benefits from its links to external partners and partnerships; including former police officers who have maintained contact with various chief constables and other external consultants who can provide a contemporary perspective of where policing is today. 

Tony is also teaching students from the UAE’s police service, which he very much enjoys because they are very enthusiastic and are keen to take the UK experience back home. At the same time Tony sees that education is a two-way process and there is much that the UK police services can learn from overseas students.

The Institute will help policing to respond and adapt to the changing face of crime — including cyber and online crime and the challenges of globalised terrorism — so that both the standards of policing and its efficacy can improve. 

Ultimately for Tony, the Institute will play an important role in teaching those who are pursuing a career in policing and criminal justice, but it is also about educating a wider audience, including the public, so that the Institute can influence and shape the future direction of policing.

Tony Blockley, Senior Lecturer in Criminal Investigation Running in parallel with his teaching at the Institute, Tony is still involved in investigating domestic homicides, which he has done on a consultancy basis since 2011...The aim of Tony’s investigations is to learn how to prevent future incidents and determine whether the death could have been predicted or prevented.